Kriza Educa

Kriza Educa

1599553645

JavaScript Tutorial - Understanding Arrow Functions in 5 Easy Steps

The usual way to define JavaScript functions is using the function declaration or function expression:

// Function declaration
function greet(who) {
  return `Hello, ${who}!`;
}

// Function expression
const greetExpression = function(who) {
  return `Hello, ${who}!`;
};

But functions can be further improved. Making the syntax shorter (useful for writing short callbacks) and ease the resolving of this created a new type of functions named arrow functions.

#javascript #arrow function #function

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JavaScript Tutorial - Understanding Arrow Functions in 5 Easy Steps
Vincent Lab

Vincent Lab

1605017502

The Difference Between Regular Functions and Arrow Functions in JavaScript

Other then the syntactical differences. The main difference is the way the this keyword behaves? In an arrow function, the this keyword remains the same throughout the life-cycle of the function and is always bound to the value of this in the closest non-arrow parent function. Arrow functions can never be constructor functions so they can never be invoked with the new keyword. And they can never have duplicate named parameters like a regular function not using strict mode.

Here are a few code examples to show you some of the differences
this.name = "Bob";

const person = {
name: “Jon”,

<span style="color: #008000">// Regular function</span>
func1: <span style="color: #0000ff">function</span> () {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
},

<span style="color: #008000">// Arrow function</span>
func2: () =&gt; {
    console.log(<span style="color: #0000ff">this</span>);
}

}

person.func1(); // Call the Regular function
// Output: {name:“Jon”, func1:[Function: func1], func2:[Function: func2]}

person.func2(); // Call the Arrow function
// Output: {name:“Bob”}

The new keyword with an arrow function
const person = (name) => console.log("Your name is " + name);
const bob = new person("Bob");
// Uncaught TypeError: person is not a constructor

If you want to see a visual presentation on the differences, then you can see the video below:

#arrow functions #javascript #regular functions #arrow functions vs normal functions #difference between functions and arrow functions

Kriza Educa

Kriza Educa

1599553645

JavaScript Tutorial - Understanding Arrow Functions in 5 Easy Steps

The usual way to define JavaScript functions is using the function declaration or function expression:

// Function declaration
function greet(who) {
  return `Hello, ${who}!`;
}

// Function expression
const greetExpression = function(who) {
  return `Hello, ${who}!`;
};

But functions can be further improved. Making the syntax shorter (useful for writing short callbacks) and ease the resolving of this created a new type of functions named arrow functions.

#javascript #arrow function #function

JavaScript: The Good Parts of Arrow Functions

When I was at a coding boot camp learning about JavaScript and ES6, everyone in class seemed to have some level of confusion around normal function declarations and the new ES6 arrow function declarations. Common questions we had included:

  • When should we use normal functions or arrow functions?
  • What are the differences between normal functions and arrow functions?
  • Are we able to use one or the other in all situations for consistency?

After doing some research, I found that normal functions and arrow functions are actually not interchangeable in certain circumstances. Apart from the syntax, normal functions and arrow functions have another major difference: the way they bind the this keyword in JavaScript.

Let’s look at a very simple example. Suppose we have a simple JavaScript object:

const obj1 = {
	  fullName: 'Object 1',
	  color: 'red',
	  print: function() {
	    console.log(`${this.fullName} is ${this.color}`);
	  }
	};

	obj1.print(); // Object 1 is red
view raw
object1.js hosted with ❤ by GitHub

We have a print method on obj1 that logs a string to the console. The result is what we have expected, that this in the print method refers to obj1 itself.

Now let’s create another object with a slightly different print method:

const obj2 = {
	  fullName: 'Object 2',
	  color: 'blue',
	  print: function() {
	    setTimeout(function() {
	      console.log(`${this.fullName} is ${this.color}`);
	    }, 1000);
	  }
	};

	obj2.print(); // undefined is undefined
view raw
object2.js hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Now the print method will only log the resulting string after one second due to setTimeout . But why is it logging undefined is undefined instead of Object 2 is blue ?

#es2015 #javascript #es6 #javascript-tips #arrow-functions #function

Terry  Tremblay

Terry Tremblay

1602147513

Now Learn JavaScript Programming Language With Microsoft

icrosoft has released a new series of video tutorials on YouTube for novice programmers to get a hands-on renowned programming language — JavaScript.

This isn’t the first attempt by Microsoft to come up with video tutorials by beginner programmers. The company also has a series of YouTube tutorials on Python for beginners.

For JavaScript, Microsoft has launched a series of 51 videos as ‘Beginner’s Series to JavaScript,’ for young programmers, developers and coders who are interested in building browser applications using JavaScript. These video tutorials will also help programmers and coders to use relevant software development kits (SDKs) and JavaScript frameworks, such as Google’s Angular.


“Learning a new framework or development environment is made even more difficult when you don’t know the programming language,” stated on the Microsoft Developer channel on YouTube. “Fortunately, we’re here to help! We’ve created this series of videos to focus on the core concepts of JavaScript.”

It further stated — while the tutorials don’t cover every aspect of JavaScript, it indeed will help in building a foundation from which one can continue to grow. By the end of this series, Microsoft claims that the novice programmers will be able to work through tutorials, quick starts, books, and other resources, continuing to grow on their own.


#news #javascript #javascript tutorial #javascript tutorials #microsoft tutorials on javascript

Giles  Goodwin

Giles Goodwin

1603176407

The real reason why JavaScript has arrow functions

Nowadays, all my code is based on the use of arrow functions. If you are still not using them yourself, then don’t be ashamed of who you are. That’s your parent’s job. Instead, find about all the benefits that you can get by using arrow functions like the cool kids.

This is an example of arrow function and the same code written traditionally:

const arrowFunction = (arg1, arg2) => arg1 + arg 2;

const traditionalFunction = function(arg1, arg2) {
  return arg1 + arg2;
};

You may notice that the code is shorter and that there is an arrow. Everything before the arrow is arguments of the function and everything after the arrow is always returned as the result of the function.

If you need a function that contains multiple statements you can still do this:

const arrowFunction = (arg1, arg2) => {
  const result = arg1 + arg2;
  return result;
};

#javascript #js #functional-javascript #functional-programming #javascript-tips