Idris Brhane

Idris Brhane

1604541180

Say “Goodbye” Relative Imports in NodeJS Projects

If you have been working on NodeJS projects for a while, I am pretty sure that you have ever seen “…/…/some/deep/import-path” syntax. I think these make you crazy with your code (or your partner 😅).

Can we refactor to make our codebase more prettier and clean? 🤔🧐

Absolutely YES!

We have many ways to do it but there may have risks and difficulties for each way. (You can try yourself with some references at the end).

The way I mention in this article is using the jsconfig.json file and babel-cli.

Image for post

Relative imports! Nightmare! 😅

#nodejs #node #javascript

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Say “Goodbye” Relative Imports in NodeJS Projects

React Native Bridge for AppAuth

React Native App Auth

React native bridge for AppAuth - an SDK for communicating with OAuth2 providers 

This versions supports react-native@0.63+. The last pre-0.63 compatible version is v5.1.3.

React Native bridge for AppAuth-iOS and AppAuth-Android SDKS for communicating with OAuth 2.0 and OpenID Connect providers.

This library should support any OAuth provider that implements the OAuth2 spec.

We only support the Authorization Code Flow.

Why you may want to use this library

AppAuth is a mature OAuth client implementation that follows the best practices set out in RFC 8252 - OAuth 2.0 for Native Apps including using SFAuthenticationSession and SFSafariViewController on iOS, and Custom Tabs on Android. WebViews are explicitly not supported due to the security and usability reasons explained in Section 8.12 of RFC 8252.

AppAuth also supports the PKCE ("Pixy") extension to OAuth which was created to secure authorization codes in public clients when custom URI scheme redirects are used.

To learn more, read this short introduction to OAuth and PKCE on the Formidable blog.

Supported methods

See Usage for example configurations, and the included Example application for a working sample.

authorize

This is the main function to use for authentication. Invoking this function will do the whole login flow and returns the access token, refresh token and access token expiry date when successful, or it throws an error when not successful.

import { authorize } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const config = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  clientId: '<YOUR_CLIENT_ID>',
  redirectUrl: '<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>',
  scopes: ['<YOUR_SCOPES_ARRAY>'],
};

const result = await authorize(config);

prefetchConfiguration

ANDROID This will prefetch the authorization service configuration. Invoking this function is optional and will speed up calls to authorize. This is only supported on Android.

import { prefetchConfiguration } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const config = {
  warmAndPrefetchChrome: true,
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  clientId: '<YOUR_CLIENT_ID>',
  redirectUrl: '<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>',
  scopes: ['<YOUR_SCOPES_ARRAY>'],
};

prefetchConfiguration(config);

config

This is your configuration object for the client. The config is passed into each of the methods with optional overrides.

  • issuer - (string) base URI of the authentication server. If no serviceConfiguration (below) is provided, issuer is a mandatory field, so that the configuration can be fetched from the issuer's OIDC discovery endpoint.
  • serviceConfiguration - (object) you may manually configure token exchange endpoints in cases where the issuer does not support the OIDC discovery protocol, or simply to avoid an additional round trip to fetch the configuration. If no issuer (above) is provided, the service configuration is mandatory.
    • authorizationEndpoint - (string) REQUIRED fully formed url to the OAuth authorization endpoint
    • tokenEndpoint - (string) REQUIRED fully formed url to the OAuth token exchange endpoint
    • revocationEndpoint - (string) fully formed url to the OAuth token revocation endpoint. If you want to be able to revoke a token and no issuer is specified, this field is mandatory.
    • registrationEndpoint - (string) fully formed url to your OAuth/OpenID Connect registration endpoint. Only necessary for servers that require client registration.
    • endSessionEndpoint - (string) fully formed url to your OpenID Connect end session endpoint. If you want to be able to end a user's session and no issuer is specified, this field is mandatory.
  • clientId - (string) REQUIRED your client id on the auth server
  • clientSecret - (string) client secret to pass to token exchange requests. :warning: Read more about client secrets
  • redirectUrl - (string) REQUIRED the url that links back to your app with the auth code
  • scopes - (array<string>) the scopes for your token, e.g. ['email', 'offline_access'].
  • additionalParameters - (object) additional parameters that will be passed in the authorization request. Must be string values! E.g. setting additionalParameters: { hello: 'world', foo: 'bar' } would add hello=world&foo=bar to the authorization request.
  • clientAuthMethod - (string) ANDROID Client Authentication Method. Can be either basic (default) for Basic Authentication or post for HTTP POST body Authentication
  • dangerouslyAllowInsecureHttpRequests - (boolean) ANDROID whether to allow requests over plain HTTP or with self-signed SSL certificates. :warning: Can be useful for testing against local server, should not be used in production. This setting has no effect on iOS; to enable insecure HTTP requests, add a NSExceptionAllowsInsecureHTTPLoads exception to your App Transport Security settings.
  • customHeaders - (object) ANDROID you can specify custom headers to pass during authorize request and/or token request.
    • authorize - ({ [key: string]: value }) headers to be passed during authorization request.
    • token - ({ [key: string]: value }) headers to be passed during token retrieval request.
    • register - ({ [key: string]: value }) headers to be passed during registration request.
  • additionalHeaders - ({ [key: string]: value }) IOS you can specify additional headers to be passed for all authorize, refresh, and register requests.
  • useNonce - (boolean) (default: true) optionally allows not sending the nonce parameter, to support non-compliant providers
  • usePKCE - (boolean) (default: true) optionally allows not sending the code_challenge parameter and skipping PKCE code verification, to support non-compliant providers.
  • skipCodeExchange - (boolean) (default: false) just return the authorization response, instead of automatically exchanging the authorization code. This is useful if this exchange needs to be done manually (not client-side)
  • connectionTimeoutSeconds - (number) configure the request timeout interval in seconds. This must be a positive number. The default values are 60 seconds on iOS and 15 seconds on Android.

result

This is the result from the auth server:

  • accessToken - (string) the access token
  • accessTokenExpirationDate - (string) the token expiration date
  • authorizeAdditionalParameters - (Object) additional url parameters from the authorizationEndpoint response.
  • tokenAdditionalParameters - (Object) additional url parameters from the tokenEndpoint response.
  • idToken - (string) the id token
  • refreshToken - (string) the refresh token
  • tokenType - (string) the token type, e.g. Bearer
  • scopes - ([string]) the scopes the user has agreed to be granted
  • authorizationCode - (string) the authorization code (only if skipCodeExchange=true)
  • codeVerifier - (string) the codeVerifier value used for the PKCE exchange (only if both skipCodeExchange=true and usePKCE=true)

refresh

This method will refresh the accessToken using the refreshToken. Some auth providers will also give you a new refreshToken

import { refresh } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const config = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  clientId: '<YOUR_CLIENT_ID>',
  redirectUrl: '<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>',
  scopes: ['<YOUR_SCOPES_ARRAY>'],
};

const result = await refresh(config, {
  refreshToken: `<REFRESH_TOKEN>`,
});

revoke

This method will revoke a token. The tokenToRevoke can be either an accessToken or a refreshToken

import { revoke } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const config = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  clientId: '<YOUR_CLIENT_ID>',
  redirectUrl: '<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>',
  scopes: ['<YOUR_SCOPES_ARRAY>'],
};

const result = await revoke(config, {
  tokenToRevoke: `<TOKEN_TO_REVOKE>`,
  includeBasicAuth: true,
  sendClientId: true,
});

logout

This method will logout a user, as per the OpenID Connect RP Initiated Logout specification. It requires an idToken, obtained after successfully authenticating with OpenID Connect, and a URL to redirect back after the logout has been performed.

import { logout } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const config = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
};

const result = await logout(config, {
  idToken: '<ID_TOKEN>',
  postLogoutRedirectUrl: '<POST_LOGOUT_URL>',
});

register

This will perform dynamic client registration on the given provider. If the provider supports dynamic client registration, it will generate a clientId for you to use in subsequent calls to this library.

import { register } from 'react-native-app-auth';

const registerConfig = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  redirectUrls: ['<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>', '<YOUR_OTHER_REDIRECT_URL>'],
};

const registerResult = await register(registerConfig);

registerConfig

  • issuer - (string) same as in authorization config
  • serviceConfiguration - (object) same as in authorization config
  • redirectUrls - (array<string>) REQUIRED specifies all of the redirect urls that your client will use for authentication
  • responseTypes - (array<string>) an array that specifies which OAuth 2.0 response types your client will use. The default value is ['code']
  • grantTypes - (array<string>) an array that specifies which OAuth 2.0 grant types your client will use. The default value is ['authorization_code']
  • subjectType - (string) requests a specific subject type for your client
  • tokenEndpointAuthMethod (string) specifies which clientAuthMethod your client will use for authentication. The default value is 'client_secret_basic'
  • additionalParameters - (object) additional parameters that will be passed in the registration request. Must be string values! E.g. setting additionalParameters: { hello: 'world', foo: 'bar' } would add hello=world&foo=bar to the authorization request.
  • dangerouslyAllowInsecureHttpRequests - (boolean) ANDROID same as in authorization config
  • customHeaders - (object) ANDROID same as in authorization config
  • connectionTimeoutSeconds - (number) configure the request timeout interval in seconds. This must be a positive number. The default values are 60 seconds on iOS and 15 seconds on Android.

registerResult

This is the result from the auth server

  • clientId - (string) the assigned client id
  • clientIdIssuedAt - (string) OPTIONAL date string of when the client id was issued
  • clientSecret - (string) OPTIONAL the assigned client secret
  • clientSecretExpiresAt - (string) date string of when the client secret expires, which will be provided if clientSecret is provided. If new Date(clientSecretExpiresAt).getTime() === 0, then the secret never expires
  • registrationClientUri - (string) OPTIONAL uri that can be used to perform subsequent operations on the registration
  • registrationAccessToken - (string) token that can be used at the endpoint given by registrationClientUri to perform subsequent operations on the registration. Will be provided if registrationClientUri is provided

Getting started

npm install react-native-app-auth --save

Setup

iOS Setup

To setup the iOS project, you need to perform three steps:

  1. Install native dependencies
  2. Register redirect URL scheme
  3. Define openURL callback in AppDelegate

Install native dependencies

This library depends on the native AppAuth-ios project. To keep the React Native library agnostic of your dependency management method, the native libraries are not distributed as part of the bridge.

AppAuth supports three options for dependency management.

  1. CocoaPods
cd ios
pod install

2.   Carthage

With Carthage, add the following line to your Cartfile:

github "openid/AppAuth-iOS" "master"

Then run carthage update --platform iOS.

Drag and drop AppAuth.framework from ios/Carthage/Build/iOS under Frameworks in Xcode.

Add a copy files build step for AppAuth.framework: open Build Phases on Xcode, add a new "Copy Files" phase, choose "Frameworks" as destination, add AppAuth.framework and ensure "Code Sign on Copy" is checked.

3.   Static Library

You can also use AppAuth-iOS as a static library. This requires linking the library and your project and including the headers. Suggested configuration:

  1. Create an XCode Workspace.
  2. Add AppAuth.xcodeproj to your Workspace.
  3. Include libAppAuth as a linked library for your target (in the "General -> Linked Framework and Libraries" section of your target).
  4. Add AppAuth-iOS/Source to your search paths of your target ("Build Settings -> "Header Search Paths").

Register redirect URL scheme

If you intend to support iOS 10 and older, you need to define the supported redirect URL schemes in your Info.plist as follows:

<key>CFBundleURLTypes</key>
<array>
  <dict>
    <key>CFBundleURLName</key>
    <string>com.your.app.identifier</string>
    <key>CFBundleURLSchemes</key>
    <array>
      <string>io.identityserver.demo</string>
    </array>
  </dict>
</array>
  • CFBundleURLName is any globally unique string. A common practice is to use your app identifier.
  • CFBundleURLSchemes is an array of URL schemes your app needs to handle. The scheme is the beginning of your OAuth Redirect URL, up to the scheme separator (:) character. E.g. if your redirect uri is com.myapp://oauth, then the url scheme will is com.myapp.

Define openURL callback in AppDelegate

You need to retain the auth session, in order to continue the authorization flow from the redirect. Follow these steps:

RNAppAuth will call on the given app's delegate via [UIApplication sharedApplication].delegate. Furthermore, RNAppAuth expects the delegate instance to conform to the protocol RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager. Make AppDelegate conform to RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager with the following changes to AppDelegate.h:

+ #import "RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager.h"

- @interface AppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate, RCTBridgeDelegate>
+ @interface AppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate, RCTBridgeDelegate, RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager>

+ @property(nonatomic, weak)id<RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManagerDelegate>authorizationFlowManagerDelegate;

Add the following code to AppDelegate.m (to support iOS <= 10 and React Navigation deep linking)

+ - (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)app openURL:(NSURL *)url options:(NSDictionary<NSString *, id> *) options {
+  if ([self.authorizationFlowManagerDelegate resumeExternalUserAgentFlowWithURL:url]) {
+    return YES;
+  }
+  return [RCTLinkingManager application:app openURL:url options:options];
+ }

If you want to support universal links, add the following to AppDelegate.m under continueUserActivity

+ if ([userActivity.activityType isEqualToString:NSUserActivityTypeBrowsingWeb]) {
+   if (self.authorizationFlowManagerDelegate) {
+     BOOL resumableAuth = [self.authorizationFlowManagerDelegate resumeExternalUserAgentFlowWithURL:userActivity.webpageURL];
+     if (resumableAuth) {
+       return YES;
+     }
+   }
+ }

Integration of the library with a Swift iOS project

The approach mentioned should work with Swift. In this case one should make AppDelegate conform to RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager. Note that this is not tested/guaranteed by the maintainers.

Steps:

  1. swift-Bridging-Header.h should include a reference to #import "RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager.h, like so:
#import <React/RCTBundleURLProvider.h>
#import <React/RCTRootView.h>
#import <React/RCTBridgeDelegate.h>
#import <React/RCTBridge.h>
#import "RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager.h" // <-- Add this header
#if DEBUG
#import <FlipperKit/FlipperClient.h>
// etc...

2.   AppDelegate.swift should implement the RNAppAuthorizationFlowManager protocol and have a handler for url deep linking. The result should look something like this:

@UIApplicationMain
class AppDelegate: UIApplicationDelegate, RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager { //<-- note the additional RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManager protocol
  public weak var authorizationFlowManagerDelegate: RNAppAuthAuthorizationFlowManagerDelegate? // <-- this property is required by the protocol
  //"open url" delegate function for managing deep linking needs to call the resumeExternalUserAgentFlowWithURL method
  func application(
      _ app: UIApplication,
      open url: URL,
      options: [UIApplicationOpenURLOptionsKey: Any] = [:]) -> Bool {
      return authorizationFlowManagerDelegate?.resumeExternalUserAgentFlowWithURL(with: url) ?? false
  }
}

Android Setup

Note: for RN >= 0.57, you will get a warning about compile being obsolete. To get rid of this warning, use patch-package to replace compile with implementation as in this PR - we're not deploying this right now, because it would break the build for RN < 57.

To setup the Android project, you need to add redirect scheme manifest placeholder:

To capture the authorization redirect, add the following property to the defaultConfig in android/app/build.gradle:

android {
  defaultConfig {
    manifestPlaceholders = [
      appAuthRedirectScheme: 'io.identityserver.demo'
    ]
  }
}

The scheme is the beginning of your OAuth Redirect URL, up to the scheme separator (:) character. E.g. if your redirect uri is com.myapp://oauth, then the url scheme will is com.myapp. The scheme must be in lowercase.

NOTE: When integrating with React Navigation deep linking, be sure to make this scheme (and the scheme in the config's redirectUrl) unique from the scheme defined in the deep linking intent-filter. E.g. if the scheme in your intent-filter is set to com.myapp, then update the above scheme/redirectUrl to be com.myapp.auth as seen here.

Usage

import { authorize } from 'react-native-app-auth';

// base config
const config = {
  issuer: '<YOUR_ISSUER_URL>',
  clientId: '<YOUR_CLIENT_ID>',
  redirectUrl: '<YOUR_REDIRECT_URL>',
  scopes: ['<YOUR_SCOPE_ARRAY>'],
};

// use the client to make the auth request and receive the authState
try {
  const result = await authorize(config);
  // result includes accessToken, accessTokenExpirationDate and refreshToken
} catch (error) {
  console.log(error);
}

Error messages

Values are in the code field of the rejected Error object.

  • OAuth Authorization error codes
  • OAuth Access Token error codes
  • OpendID Connect Registration error codes
  • service_configuration_fetch_error - could not fetch the service configuration
  • authentication_failed - user authentication failed
  • token_refresh_failed - could not exchange the refresh token for a new JWT
  • registration_failed - could not register
  • browser_not_found (Android only) - no suitable browser installed

Note about client secrets

Some authentication providers, including examples cited below, require you to provide a client secret. The authors of the AppAuth library

strongly recommend you avoid using static client secrets in your native applications whenever possible. Client secrets derived via a dynamic client registration are safe to use, but static client secrets can be easily extracted from your apps and allow others to impersonate your app and steal user data. If client secrets must be used by the OAuth2 provider you are integrating with, we strongly recommend performing the code exchange step on your backend, where the client secret can be kept hidden.

Having said this, in some cases using client secrets is unavoidable. In these cases, a clientSecret parameter can be provided to authorize/refresh calls when performing a token request.

Token Storage

Recommendations on secure token storage can be found here.

Maintenance Status

Active: Formidable is actively working on this project, and we expect to continue for work for the foreseeable future. Bug reports, feature requests and pull requests are welcome.

Tested OpenID providers

These providers are OpenID compliant, which means you can use autodiscovery.

Tested OAuth2 providers

These providers implement the OAuth2 spec, but are not OpenID providers, which means you must configure the authorization and token endpoints yourself.

Download Details:
Author: FormidableLabs
Source Code: https://github.com/FormidableLabs/react-native-app-auth
License: MIT License

#react  #reactnative  #mobileapp #javascript #java 

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1593867420

Top Android Projects with Source Code

Android Projects with Source Code – Your entry pass into the world of Android

Hello Everyone, welcome to this article, which is going to be really important to all those who’re in dilemma for their projects and the project submissions. This article is also going to help you if you’re an enthusiast looking forward to explore and enhance your Android skills. The reason is that we’re here to provide you the best ideas of Android Project with source code that you can choose as per your choice.

These project ideas are simple suggestions to help you deal with the difficulty of choosing the correct projects. In this article, we’ll see the project ideas from beginners level and later we’ll move on to intermediate to advance.

top android projects with source code

Android Projects with Source Code

Before working on real-time projects, it is recommended to create a sample hello world project in android studio and get a flavor of project creation as well as execution: Create your first android project

Android Projects for beginners

1. Calculator

build a simple calculator app in android studio source code

Android Project: A calculator will be an easy application if you have just learned Android and coding for Java. This Application will simply take the input values and the operation to be performed from the users. After taking the input it’ll return the results to them on the screen. This is a really easy application and doesn’t need use of any particular package.

To make a calculator you’d need Android IDE, Kotlin/Java for coding, and for layout of your application, you’d need XML or JSON. For this, coding would be the same as that in any language, but in the form of an application. Not to forget creating a calculator initially will increase your logical thinking.

Once the user installs the calculator, they’re ready to use it even without the internet. They’ll enter the values, and the application will show them the value after performing the given operations on the entered operands.

Source Code: Simple Calculator Project

2. A Reminder App

Android Project: This is a good project for beginners. A Reminder App can help you set reminders for different events that you have throughout the day. It’ll help you stay updated with all your tasks for the day. It can be useful for all those who are not so good at organizing their plans and forget easily. This would be a simple application just whose task would be just to remind you of something at a particular time.

To make a Reminder App you need to code in Kotlin/Java and design the layout using XML or JSON. For the functionality of the app, you’d need to make use of AlarmManager Class and Notifications in Android.

In this, the user would be able to set reminders and time in the application. Users can schedule reminders that would remind them to drink water again and again throughout the day. Or to remind them of their medications.

3. Quiz Application

Android Project: Another beginner’s level project Idea can be a Quiz Application in android. Here you can provide the users with Quiz on various general knowledge topics. These practices will ensure that you’re able to set the layouts properly and slowly increase your pace of learning the Android application development. In this you’ll learn to use various Layout components at the same time understanding them better.

To make a quiz application you’ll need to code in Java and set layouts using xml or java whichever you prefer. You can also use JSON for the layouts whichever preferable.

In the app, questions would be asked and answers would be shown as multiple choices. The user selects the answer and gets shown on the screen if the answers are correct. In the end the final marks would be shown to the users.

4. Simple Tic-Tac-Toe

android project tic tac toe game app

Android Project: Tic-Tac-Toe is a nice game, I guess most of you all are well aware of it. This will be a game for two players. In this android game, users would be putting X and O in the given 9 parts of a box one by one. The first player to arrange X or O in an adjacent line of three wins.

To build this game, you’d need Java and XML for Android Studio. And simply apply the logic on that. This game will have a set of three matches. So, it’ll also have a scoreboard. This scoreboard will show the final result at the end of one complete set.

Upon entering the game they’ll enter their names. And that’s when the game begins. They’ll touch one of the empty boxes present there and get their turn one by one. At the end of the game, there would be a winner declared.

Source Code: Tic Tac Toe Game Project

5. Stopwatch

Android Project: A stopwatch is another simple android project idea that will work the same as a normal handheld timepiece that measures the time elapsed between its activation and deactivation. This application will have three buttons that are: start, stop, and hold.

This application would need to use Java and XML. For this application, we need to set the timer properly as it is initially set to milliseconds, and that should be converted to minutes and then hours properly. The users can use this application and all they’d need to do is, start the stopwatch and then stop it when they are done. They can also pause the timer and continue it again when they like.

6. To Do App

Android Project: This is another very simple project idea for you as a beginner. This application as the name suggests will be a To-Do list holding app. It’ll store the users schedules and their upcoming meetings or events. In this application, users will be enabled to write their important notes as well. To make it safe, provide a login page before the user can access it.

So, this app will have a login page, sign-up page, logout system, and the area to write their tasks, events, or important notes. You can build it in android studio using Java and XML at ease. Using XML you can build the user interface as user-friendly as you can. And to store the users’ data, you can use SQLite enabling the users to even delete the data permanently.

Now for users, they will sign up and get access to the write section. Here the users can note down the things and store them permanently. Users can also alter the data or delete them. Finally, they can logout and also, login again and again whenever they like.

7. Roman to decimal converter

Android Project: This app is aimed at the conversion of Roman numbers to their significant decimal number. It’ll help to check the meaning of the roman numbers. Moreover, it will be easy to develop and will help you get your hands on coding and Android.

You need to use Android Studio, Java for coding and XML for interface. The application will take input from the users and convert them to decimal. Once it converts the Roman no. into decimal, it will show the results on the screen.

The users are supposed to just enter the Roman Number and they’ll get the decimal values on the screen. This can be a good android project for final year students.

8. Virtual Dice Roller

Android Project: Well, coming to this part that is Virtual Dice or a random no. generator. It is another simple but interesting app for computer science students. The only task that it would need to do would be to generate a number randomly. This can help people who’re often confused between two or more things.

Using a simple random number generator you can actually create something as good as this. All you’d need to do is get you hands-on OnClick listeners. And a good layout would be cherry on the cake.

The user’s task would be to set the range of the numbers and then click on the roll button. And the app will show them a randomly generated number. Isn’t it interesting ? Try soon!

9. A Scientific Calculator App

Android Project: This application is very important for you as a beginner as it will let you use your logical thinking and improve your programming skills. This is a scientific calculator that will help the users to do various calculations at ease.

To make this application you’d need to use Android Studio. Here you’d need to use arithmetic logics for the calculations. The user would need to give input to the application that will be in terms of numbers. After that, the user will give the operator as an input. Then the Application will calculate and generate the result on the user screen.

10. SMS App

Android Project: An SMS app is another easy but effective idea. It will let you send the SMS to various no. just in the same way as you use the default messaging application in your phone. This project will help you with better understanding of SMSManager in Android.

For this application, you would need to implement Java class SMSManager in Android. For the Layout you can use XML or JSON. Implementing SMSManager into the app is an easy task, so you would love this.

The user would be provided with the facility to text to whichever number they wish also, they’d be able to choose the numbers from the contact list. Another thing would be the Textbox, where they’ll enter their message. Once the message is entered they can happily click on the send button.

#android tutorials #android application final year project #android mini projects #android project for beginners #android project ideas #android project ideas for beginners #android projects #android projects for students #android projects with source code #android topics list #intermediate android projects #real-time android projects

Umeng Analytics & Push Flutter Plugins

Umeng Analytics&Push Flutter Plugins(umeng_analytics_push) 

  • Language: English | 中文简体
  • Umeng API: umeng:analytics & umeng:push
  • Tip: From v2.1.0 supported Umeng "Compliance Guide" Android IOS, and made appropriate adjustments to facilitate integration.
  • Note: The following document description shall prevail, do not refer to the settings in the example

Usages

Import

dependencies:
  umeng_analytics_push: ^x.x.x #The latest version is shown above, plugin1.x supports flutter1.x, plugin2.x supports flutter2.x

# Or import through Git (choose one, Git version may be updated more timely)

dependencies:
  umeng_analytics_push:
      git:
        url: https://github.com/zileyuan/umeng_analytics_push.git

Android pretreatment settings (with Kotlin example)

Create a custom FlutterApplication class as the startup class, if the push function is not needed, uemng_message_secret is set to null or ""

package com.demo.umeng.app

import io.flutter.app.FlutterApplication
import io.github.zileyuan.umeng_analytics_push.UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid

class MyFlutterApplication: FlutterApplication() {
    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.androidPreInit(this, "uemng_app_key", "channel", "uemng_message_secret")
    }
}

Modify MainActivity, add Umeng settings

package com.demo.umeng.app

import android.os.Handler
import android.os.Looper
import android.content.Intent
import androidx.annotation.NonNull;
import io.flutter.embedding.android.FlutterActivity
import io.flutter.embedding.engine.FlutterEngine
import io.flutter.plugins.GeneratedPluginRegistrant
import io.github.zileyuan.umeng_analytics_push.UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid
import io.github.zileyuan.umeng_analytics_push.UmengAnalyticsPushPlugin

class MainActivity: FlutterActivity() {
    var handler: Handler = Handler(Looper.myLooper())

    override fun configureFlutterEngine(@NonNull flutterEngine: FlutterEngine) {
        GeneratedPluginRegistrant.registerWith(flutterEngine);
    }

    override fun onNewIntent(intent: Intent) {
        // Actively update and save the intent every time you go back to the front desk, and then you can get the latest intent
        setIntent(intent);
        super.onNewIntent(intent);
    }

    override fun onResume() {
        super.onResume()
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.androidOnResume(this)
        if (getIntent().getExtras() != null) {
            var message = getIntent().getExtras().getString("message")
            if (message != null && message != "") {
                // To start the interface, wait for the engine to load, and send it to the interface with a delay of 5 seconds
                handler.postDelayed(object : Runnable {
                    override fun run() {
                        UmengAnalyticsPushPlugin.eventSink.success(message)
                    }
                }, 5000)
            }
        }
    }

    override fun onPause() {
        super.onPause()
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.androidOnPause(this)
    }
}

Modify the AndroidManifest.xml file

<application
  android:name="com.demo.umeng.app.MyFlutterApplication">
</application>

Add the vendor push channel, see the official documentation for details umeng:push:vendor

Modify MyFlutterApplication

package com.demo.umeng.app

import io.flutter.app.FlutterApplication
import io.github.zileyuan.umeng_analytics_push.UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid

class MyFlutterApplication: FlutterApplication() {
    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.androidInit(this, "uemng_app_key", "channel", "uemng_message_secret")
        // Register Xiaomi Push (optional)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.registerXiaomi(this, "xiaomi_app_id", "xiaomi_app_key")
        // Register Huawei Push (optional, need add other infomation in AndroidManifest.xml)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.registerHuawei(this)
        // Register Oppo Push (optional)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.registerOppo(this, "oppo_app_key", "oppo_app_secret")
        // Register Vivo Push (optional, need add other infomation in AndroidManifest.xml)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.registerVivo(this)
        // Register Meizu Push (optional)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterAndroid.registerMeizu(this, "meizu_app_id", "meizu_app_key")
    }
}

Modify the AndroidManifest.xml, fill in the real id or key

<application
  android:name="com.demo.umeng.app.MyFlutterApplication">
    <!-- Vivo push channel start (optional) -->
    <meta-data
        android:name="com.vivo.push.api_key"
        android:value="vivo_api_key" />
    <meta-data
        android:name="com.vivo.push.app_id"
        android:value="vivo_app_id" />
    <!-- Vivo push channel end-->

    <!-- Huawei push channel start (optional) -->
    <meta-data
        android:name="com.huawei.hms.client.appid"
        android:value="appid=huawei_app_id" />
    <!-- Huawei push channel end-->
</application>

Use the following parameters to send, accept offline messages

"mipush": true
"mi_activity": "io.github.zileyuan.umeng_analytics_push.OfflineNotifyClickActivity"  

If the App needs to use proguard for obfuscated packaging, please add the following obfuscated code

-dontwarn com.umeng.**
-dontwarn com.taobao.**
-dontwarn anet.channel.**
-dontwarn anetwork.channel.**
-dontwarn org.android.**
-dontwarn org.apache.thrift.**
-dontwarn com.xiaomi.**
-dontwarn com.huawei.**
-dontwarn com.meizu.**

-keepattributes *Annotation*

-keep class com.taobao.** {*;}
-keep class org.android.** {*;}
-keep class anet.channel.** {*;}
-keep class com.umeng.** {*;}
-keep class com.xiaomi.** {*;}
-keep class com.huawei.** {*;}
-keep class com.meizu.** {*;}
-keep class org.apache.thrift.** {*;}

-keep class com.alibaba.sdk.android.** {*;}
-keep class com.ut.** {*;}
-keep class com.ta.** {*;}

-keep public class **.R$* {
    public static final int *;
}

IOS pretreatment settings (with Swift example)

Modify AppDelegate.swift file

import UIKit
import Flutter

@UIApplicationMain
@objc class AppDelegate: FlutterAppDelegate {
    override func application(_ application: UIApplication, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions launchOptions: [UIApplication.LaunchOptionsKey: Any]?) -> Bool {
        GeneratedPluginRegistrant.register(with: self)
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterIos.iosPreInit(launchOptions, appkey:"uemng_app_key", channel:"appstore");
        return super.application(application, didFinishLaunchingWithOptions: launchOptions)
    }

    // If you need to handle Push clicks, use the following code
    @available(iOS 10.0, *)
    override func userNotificationCenter(_ center: UNUserNotificationCenter, didReceive response: UNNotificationResponse, withCompletionHandler completionHandler: @escaping () -> Void) {
        let userInfo = response.notification.request.content.userInfo
        UmengAnalyticsPushFlutterIos.handleMessagePush(userInfo)
        completionHandler()
    }
}

Modify Runner-Bridging-Header.h file

#import "GeneratedPluginRegistrant.h"
#import <UMCommon/UMCommon.h>
#import <UMCommon/MobClick.h>
#import <UMPush/UMessage.h>
#import <UserNotifications/UserNotifications.h>
#import <umeng_analytics_push/UmengAnalyticsPushIos.h>

Use in Flutter

Initialize Umeng, call it after agreeing to the "Privacy Policy" according to the "Compliance Guide", two parameter switches, one is log, the other is push

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.initUmeng(false, true);

Click Push response

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';
import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/message_model.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.addPushMessageCallback((MessageModel message) {
  print("UmengAnalyticsPush Message ======> $message");
});

Operation Alias

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.addAlias('1001', 'jobcode');
UmengAnalyticsPush.setAlias('1002', 'jobcode');
UmengAnalyticsPush.deleteAlias('1002', 'jobcode');

Operation Tags

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.addTags('manager');
UmengAnalyticsPush.deleteTags('manager');

Page buried point operation

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.pageStart('memberPage');
UmengAnalyticsPush.pageEnd('memberPage');

Custom event

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

UmengAnalyticsPush.event('customEvent', '1000');

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add umeng_analytics_push

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  umeng_analytics_push: ^2.1.3

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:umeng_analytics_push/umeng_analytics_push.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() => runApp(MyApp());

class MyApp extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  _MyAppState createState() => _MyAppState();
}

class _MyAppState extends State<MyApp> {

  @override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      home: Scaffold(
        appBar: AppBar(
          title: const Text('Plugin example app'),
        ),
        body: Center(
        ),
      ),
    );
  }
} 

Download Details:

Author: zileyuan

Source Code: https://github.com/zileyuan/umeng_analytics_push

#flutter #analytics 

Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1595547778

10 Writing steps to create a good project brief - Mobile app development

Developing a mobile application can often be more challenging than it seems at first glance. Whether you’re a developer, UI designer, project lead or CEO of a mobile-based startup, writing good project briefs prior to development is pivotal. According to Tech Jury, 87% of smartphone users spend time exclusively on mobile apps, with 18-24-year-olds spending 66% of total digital time on mobile apps. Of that, 89% of the time is spent on just 18 apps depending on individual users’ preferences, making proper app planning crucial for success.

Today’s audiences know what they want and don’t want in their mobile apps, encouraging teams to carefully write their project plans before they approach development. But how do you properly write a mobile app development brief without sacrificing your vision and staying within the initial budget? Why should you do so in the first place? Let’s discuss that and more in greater detail.

Why a Good Mobile App Project Brief Matters?

Why-a-Good-Mobile-App-Project-Brief-Matters

It’s worth discussing the significance of mobile app project briefs before we tackle the writing process itself. In practice, a project brief is used as a reference tool for developers to remain focused on the client’s deliverables. Approaching the development process without written and approved documentation can lead to drastic, last-minute changes, misunderstanding, as well as a loss of resources and brand reputation.

For example, developing a mobile app that filters restaurants based on food type, such as Happy Cow, means that developers should stay focused on it. Knowing that such and such features, UI elements, and API are necessary will help team members collaborate better in order to meet certain expectations. Whether you develop an app under your brand’s banner or outsource coding and design services to would-be clients, briefs can provide you with several benefits:

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  • Point of reference for developers, project leads, and clients throughout the cycle
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  • Streamlined project data storage for further app updates and iterations

Writing Steps to Create a Good Mobile App Project Brief

Writing-Steps-to-Create-a-Good-Mobile-App-Project-Brief

1. Establish the “You” Behind the App

Depending on how “open” your project is to the public, you will want to write a detailed section about who the developers are. Elements such as company name, address, project lead, project title, as well as contact information, should be included in this introductory segment. Regardless of whether you build an in-house app or outsource developers to a client, this section is used for easy document storage and access.

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