Wasswa  Meagan

Wasswa Meagan

1640613600

How To Monitor Your PostgreSQL Database

How To Monitor Your PostgreSQL Database

Monitoring tools eliminate the need to continuously check logs and remove uncertainty. In this article, we will look at how to monitor your PostgreSQL database and which are the most popular monitoring tools.

#postgresql 

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How To Monitor Your PostgreSQL Database
Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1624175520

Monitor PostgreSQL Performance Using a Database Health Dashboard

Why Monitor PostgreSQL Database Health?

Just like monitoring our applications, it is very much necessary to monitor our database system. We want to monitor things substantially more granular than system-level processes — things such as:

  • How many queries actually make use of the index?
  • How effective is the database cache?
  • The number of open connections.

And so on.

Hardware metrics are essential, but can only get us so far, and will not help us make concrete decisions — like which queries to optimize and how we are using our database in general. Since PostgreSQL is an open-source database, it offers a lot of insights for free without having to rely on costly tools. Most of the metrics we are going to track are available by default since they are required for the query planner, but there are other critical areas for which we have to enable certain extensions/contrib modules that ship along with PostgreSQL.

Introduction to the Arctype Tool

Arctype is a very neat database tool that can be used not just as an SQL editor but also as a platform upon which complex dashboards can be both custom-built and shared around with developers/users. To understand its true power, we are going to consider a practical use case — monitoring a PostgreSQL database health.

#database #data-visualization #guide #postgresql #schema #monitor postgresql performance using a database health dashboard

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1624159980

Monitor PostgreSQL Performance Using a Database Health Dashboard

A PostgreSQL database health dashboard allows us to monitor the database in real-time and helps us to more fully understand some features which are unique to PostgreSQL.

Why Monitor PostgreSQL Database Health?

Just like monitoring our applications, it is very much necessary to monitor our database system. We want to monitor things substantially more granular than system-level processes—things such as:

  • How many queries actually make use of the index?
  • How effective is the database cache?
  • The number of open connections.

And so on.

Hardware metrics are essential, but can only get us so far, and will not help us make concrete decisions—like which queries to optimize and how we are using our database in general. Since PostgreSQL is an open-source database, it offers a lot of insights for free without having to rely on costly tools. Most of the metrics we are going to track are available by default since they are required for the query planner, but there are other critical areas for which we have to enable certain extensions/contrib modules that ship along with PostgreSQL.

Introduction to the Arctype Tool

Arctype is a very neat database tool that can be used not just as an SQL editor but also as a platform upon which complex dashboards can be both custom-built and shared around with developers/users. To understand its true power, we are going to consider a practical use case—monitoring a PostgreSQL database health.

#databases #data visualization #guide #postgresql #schema #monitor postgresql performance using a database health dashboard

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1598959140

How to Monitor Third Party API Integrations

Many enterprises and SaaS companies depend on a variety of external API integrations in order to build an awesome customer experience. Some integrations may outsource certain business functionality such as handling payments or search to companies like Stripe and Algolia. You may have integrated other partners which expand the functionality of your product offering, For example, if you want to add real-time alerts to an analytics tool, you might want to integrate the PagerDuty and Slack APIs into your application.

If you’re like most companies though, you’ll soon realize you’re integrating hundreds of different vendors and partners into your app. Any one of them could have performance or functional issues impacting your customer experience. Worst yet, the reliability of an integration may be less visible than your own APIs and backend. If the login functionality is broken, you’ll have many customers complaining they cannot log into your website. However, if your Slack integration is broken, only the customers who added Slack to their account will be impacted. On top of that, since the integration is asynchronous, your customers may not realize the integration is broken until after a few days when they haven’t received any alerts for some time.

How do you ensure your API integrations are reliable and high performing? After all, if you’re selling a feature real-time alerting, you’re alerts better well be real-time and have at least once guaranteed delivery. Dropping alerts because your Slack or PagerDuty integration is unacceptable from a customer experience perspective.

What to monitor

Latency

Specific API integrations that have an exceedingly high latency could be a signal that your integration is about to fail. Maybe your pagination scheme is incorrect or the vendor has not indexed your data in the best way for you to efficiently query.

Latency best practices

Average latency only tells you half the story. An API that consistently takes one second to complete is usually better than an API with high variance. For example if an API only takes 30 milliseconds on average, but 1 out of 10 API calls take up to five seconds, then you have high variance in your customer experience. This is makes it much harder to track down bugs and harder to handle in your customer experience. This is why 90th percentile and 95th percentiles are important to look at.

Reliability

Reliability is a key metric to monitor especially since your integrating APIs that you don’t have control over. What percent of API calls are failing? In order to track reliability, you should have a rigid definition on what constitutes a failure.

Reliability best practices

While any API call that has a response status code in the 4xx or 5xx family may be considered an error, you might have specific business cases where the API appears to successfully complete yet the API call should still be considered a failure. For example, a data API integration that returns no matches or no content consistently could be considered failing even though the status code is always 200 OK. Another API could be returning bogus or incomplete data. Data validation is critical for measuring where the data returned is correct and up to date.

Not every API provider and integration partner follows suggested status code mapping

Availability

While reliability is specific to errors and functional correctness, availability and uptime is a pure infrastructure metric that measures how often a service has an outage, even if temporary. Availability is usually measured as a percentage of uptime per year or number of 9’s.

AVAILABILITY %DOWNTIME PER YEARDOWNTIME PER MONTHDOWNTIME PER WEEKDOWNTIME PER DAY90% (“one nine”)36.53 days73.05 hours16.80 hours2.40 hours99% (“two nines”)3.65 days7.31 hours1.68 hours14.40 minutes99.9% (“three nines”)8.77 hours43.83 minutes10.08 minutes1.44 minutes99.99% (“four nines”)52.60 minutes4.38 minutes1.01 minutes8.64 seconds99.999% (“five nines”)5.26 minutes26.30 seconds6.05 seconds864.00 milliseconds99.9999% (“six nines”)31.56 seconds2.63 seconds604.80 milliseconds86.40 milliseconds99.99999% (“seven nines”)3.16 seconds262.98 milliseconds60.48 milliseconds8.64 milliseconds99.999999% (“eight nines”)315.58 milliseconds26.30 milliseconds6.05 milliseconds864.00 microseconds99.9999999% (“nine nines”)31.56 milliseconds2.63 milliseconds604.80 microseconds86.40 microseconds

Usage

Many API providers are priced on API usage. Even if the API is free, they most likely have some sort of rate limiting implemented on the API to ensure bad actors are not starving out good clients. This means tracking your API usage with each integration partner is critical to understand when your current usage is close to the plan limits or their rate limits.

Usage best practices

It’s recommended to tie usage back to your end-users even if the API integration is quite downstream from your customer experience. This enables measuring the direct ROI of specific integrations and finding trends. For example, let’s say your product is a CRM, and you are paying Clearbit $199 dollars a month to enrich up to 2,500 companies. That is a direct cost you have and is tied to your customer’s usage. If you have a free tier and they are using the most of your Clearbit quota, you may want to reconsider your pricing strategy. Potentially, Clearbit enrichment should be on the paid tiers only to reduce your own cost.

How to monitor API integrations

Monitoring API integrations seems like the correct remedy to stay on top of these issues. However, traditional Application Performance Monitoring (APM) tools like New Relic and AppDynamics focus more on monitoring the health of your own websites and infrastructure. This includes infrastructure metrics like memory usage and requests per minute along with application level health such as appdex scores and latency. Of course, if you’re consuming an API that’s running in someone else’s infrastructure, you can’t just ask your third-party providers to install an APM agent that you have access to. This means you need a way to monitor the third-party APIs indirectly or via some other instrumentation methodology.

#monitoring #api integration #api monitoring #monitoring and alerting #monitoring strategies #monitoring tools #api integrations #monitoring microservices

Ruth  Nabimanya

Ruth Nabimanya

1620633584

System Databases in SQL Server

Introduction

In SSMS, we many of may noticed System Databases under the Database Folder. But how many of us knows its purpose?. In this article lets discuss about the System Databases in SQL Server.

System Database

Fig. 1 System Databases

There are five system databases, these databases are created while installing SQL Server.

  • Master
  • Model
  • MSDB
  • Tempdb
  • Resource
Master
  • This database contains all the System level Information in SQL Server. The Information in form of Meta data.
  • Because of this master database, we are able to access the SQL Server (On premise SQL Server)
Model
  • This database is used as a template for new databases.
  • Whenever a new database is created, initially a copy of model database is what created as new database.
MSDB
  • This database is where a service called SQL Server Agent stores its data.
  • SQL server Agent is in charge of automation, which includes entities such as jobs, schedules, and alerts.
TempDB
  • The Tempdb is where SQL Server stores temporary data such as work tables, sort space, row versioning information and etc.
  • User can create their own version of temporary tables and those are stored in Tempdb.
  • But this database is destroyed and recreated every time when we restart the instance of SQL Server.
Resource
  • The resource database is a hidden, read only database that holds the definitions of all system objects.
  • When we query system object in a database, they appear to reside in the sys schema of the local database, but in actually their definitions reside in the resource db.

#sql server #master system database #model system database #msdb system database #sql server system databases #ssms #system database #system databases in sql server #tempdb system database

Django-allauth: A simple Boilerplate to Setup Authentication

Django-Authentication 

A simple Boilerplate to Setup Authentication using Django-allauth, with a custom template for login and registration using django-crispy-forms.

Getting Started

Prerequisites

  • Python 3.8.6 or higher

Project setup

# clone the repo
$ git clone https://github.com/yezz123/Django-Authentication

# move to the project folder
$ cd Django-Authentication

Creating virtual environment

  • Create a virtual environment for this project:
# creating pipenv environment for python 3
$ virtualenv venv

# activating the pipenv environment
$ cd venv/bin #windows environment you activate from Scripts folder

# if you have multiple python 3 versions installed then
$ source ./activate

Configured Enviromment

Environment variables

SECRET_KEY = #random string
DEBUG = #True or False
ALLOWED_HOSTS = #localhost
DATABASE_NAME = #database name (You can just use the default if you want to use SQLite)
DATABASE_USER = #database user for postgres
DATABASE_PASSWORD = #database password for postgres
DATABASE_HOST = #database host for postgres
DATABASE_PORT = #database port for postgres
ACCOUNT_EMAIL_VERIFICATION = #mandatory or optional
EMAIL_BACKEND = #email backend
EMAIL_HOST = #email host
EMAIL_HOST_PASSWORD = #email host password
EMAIL_USE_TLS = # if your email use tls
EMAIL_PORT = #email port

change all the environment variables in the .env.sample and don't forget to rename it to .env.

Run the project

After Setup the environment, you can run the project using the Makefile provided in the project folder.

help:
 @echo "Targets:"
 @echo "    make install" #install requirements
 @echo "    make makemigrations" #prepare migrations
 @echo "    make migrations" #migrate database
 @echo "    make createsuperuser" #create superuser
 @echo "    make run_server" #run the server
 @echo "    make lint" #lint the code using black
 @echo "    make test" #run the tests using Pytest

Preconfigured Packages

Includes preconfigured packages to kick start Django-Authentication by just setting appropriate configuration.

PackageUsage
django-allauthIntegrated set of Django applications addressing authentication, registration, account management as well as 3rd party (social) account authentication.
django-crispy-formsdjango-crispy-forms provides you with a crispy filter and {% crispy %} tag that will let you control the rendering behavior of your Django forms in a very elegant and DRY way.

Contributing

  • Django-Authentication is a simple project, so you can contribute to it by just adding your code to the project to improve it.
  • If you have any questions, please feel free to open an issue or create a pull request.

Download Details:
Author: yezz123
Source Code: https://github.com/yezz123/Django-Authentication
License: MIT License

#django #python