Lessie  Fisher

Lessie Fisher

1640251740

How to Add Manifest & Auth for A Cryptocurrency Connector

Hey Coders! The data is out there, but not always can you get it for free. Sometimes you'll need to have proper authentication in order to see and analyze your data. With Data Studio and Apps Script, you can make sure the users who access your community connector have proper credentials, either through an API Key, OAuth2, Username and Password, and more before even getting to the Business Intelligence Dashboard. In this video, we'll go over setting up getAuthType() in order to properly authenticate your users. Additionally, we'll learn how to publish a custom community connector by adding a few key pieces of metadata to your appsscript.json manifest file. Watch the above tutorial to learn how to do both on your journey to build a full-fledged community connector in Data Studio!

Check out the source code on GitHub:
https://github.com/davidtheweiss/Apps-Script-Season-15-Data-Studio-Service


ūüēí Timestamps
0:00 Intro
0:42 Modifying the Apps Script Manifest
5:00 getAuthType() with no Additional Authentication
7:05 Deploying your First Community Connector
10:33 getAuthType() with API Key Authentication
12:06 setCredentials(), isAuthValid(), resetAuth()
13:04 Save API Key Credentials in PropertiesService
16:05 Using isAuthValid() to validate API Key
17:33 Updating the Deployment adding actual API Key
18:38 Troubleshooting a Common Error: {muteHttpExceptions: true}

#cryptocurrency #script 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Add Manifest & Auth for A Cryptocurrency Connector
Amara Sophi

Amara Sophi

1593680226

Kickstart your Reliable Cryptocurrency Exchange Business in 2020!

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Whether If you want to build your exchange platform from scratch or to leverage white label exchange development solutions, we can help and assist you. Our customized crypto development solutions will accomplish your business goals and make a way for your long term success.

Check out here to know more >> https://www.cryptoexchangescript.com/

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#cryptocurrency exchange script #cryptocurrency exchange software #cryptocurrency trading software #cryptocurrency trading script #cryptocurrency exchange website script #cryptocurrency trading website script

How to Create Arrays in Python

In this tutorial, you'll know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Learn how to use Python arrays. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.

This tutorialvideo on 'Arrays in Python' will help you establish a strong hold on all the fundamentals in python programming language. Below are the topics covered in this video:  
1:15 What is an array?
2:53 Is python list same as an array?
3:48  How to create arrays in python?
7:19 Accessing array elements
9:59 Basic array operations
        - 10:33  Finding the length of an array
        - 11:44  Adding Elements
        - 15:06  Removing elements
        - 18:32  Array concatenation
       - 20:59  Slicing
       - 23:26  Looping  


Python Array Tutorial ‚Äď Define, Index, Methods

In this article, you'll learn how to use Python arrays. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.

The artcile covers arrays that you create by importing the array module. We won't cover NumPy arrays here.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction to Arrays
    1. The differences between Lists and Arrays
    2. When to use arrays
  2. How to use arrays
    1. Define arrays
    2. Find the length of arrays
    3. Array indexing
    4. Search through arrays
    5. Loop through arrays
    6. Slice an array
  3. Array methods for performing operations
    1. Change an existing value
    2. Add a new value
    3. Remove a value
  4. Conclusion

Let's get started!

What are Python Arrays?

Arrays are a fundamental data structure, and an important part of most programming languages. In Python, they are containers which are able to store more than one item at the same time.

Specifically, they are an ordered collection of elements with every value being of the same data type. That is the most important thing to remember about Python arrays - the fact that they can only hold a sequence of multiple items that are of the same type.

What's the Difference between Python Lists and Python Arrays?

Lists are one of the most common data structures in Python, and a core part of the language.

Lists and arrays behave similarly.

Just like arrays, lists are an ordered sequence of elements.

They are also mutable and not fixed in size, which means they can grow and shrink throughout the life of the program. Items can be added and removed, making them very flexible to work with.

However, lists and arrays are not the same thing.

Lists store items that are of various data types. This means that a list can contain integers, floating point numbers, strings, or any other Python data type, at the same time. That is not the case with arrays.

As mentioned in the section above, arrays store only items that are of the same single data type. There are arrays that contain only integers, or only floating point numbers, or only any other Python data type you want to use.

When to Use Python Arrays

Lists are built into the Python programming language, whereas arrays aren't. Arrays are not a built-in data structure, and therefore need to be imported via the array module in order to be used.

Arrays of the array module are a thin wrapper over C arrays, and are useful when you want to work with homogeneous data.

They are also more compact and take up less memory and space which makes them more size efficient compared to lists.

If you want to perform mathematical calculations, then you should use NumPy arrays by importing the NumPy package. Besides that, you should just use Python arrays when you really need to, as lists work in a similar way and are more flexible to work with.

How to Use Arrays in Python

In order to create Python arrays, you'll first have to import the array module which contains all the necassary functions.

There are three ways you can import the array module:

  • By using import array at the top of the file. This includes the module array. You would then go on to create an array using array.array().
import array

#how you would create an array
array.array()
  • Instead of having to type array.array() all the time, you could use import array as arr at the top of the file, instead of import array alone. You would then create an array by typing arr.array(). The arr acts as an alias name, with the array constructor then immediately following it.
import array as arr

#how you would create an array
arr.array()
  • Lastly, you could also use from array import *, with * importing all the functionalities available. You would then create an array by writing the array() constructor alone.
from array import *

#how you would create an array
array()

How to Define Arrays in Python

Once you've imported the array module, you can then go on to define a Python array.

The general syntax for creating an array looks like this:

variable_name = array(typecode,[elements])

Let's break it down:

  • variable_name would be the name of the array.
  • The typecode specifies what kind of elements would be stored in the array. Whether it would be an array of integers, an array of floats or an array of any other Python data type. Remember that all elements should be of the same data type.
  • Inside square brackets you mention the elements that would be stored in the array, with each element being separated by a comma. You can also create an empty array by just writing variable_name = array(typecode) alone, without any elements.

Below is a typecode table, with the different typecodes that can be used with the different data types when defining Python arrays:

TYPECODEC TYPEPYTHON TYPESIZE
'b'signed charint1
'B'unsigned charint1
'u'wchar_tUnicode character2
'h'signed shortint2
'H'unsigned shortint2
'i'signed intint2
'I'unsigned intint2
'l'signed longint4
'L'unsigned longint4
'q'signed long longint8
'Q'unsigned long longint8
'f'floatfloat4
'd'doublefloat8

Tying everything together, here is an example of how you would define an array in Python:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

Let's break it down:

  • First we included the array module, in this case with import array as arr .
  • Then, we created a numbers array.
  • We used arr.array() because of import array as arr .
  • Inside the array() constructor, we first included i, for signed integer. Signed integer means that the array can include positive and negative values. Unsigned integer, with H for example, would mean that no negative values are allowed.
  • Lastly, we included the values to be stored in the array in square brackets.

Keep in mind that if you tried to include values that were not of i typecode, meaning they were not integer values, you would get an error:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
# File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 14, in <module>
#   numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

In the example above, I tried to include a floating point number in the array. I got an error because this is meant to be an integer array only.

Another way to create an array is the following:

from array import *

#an array of floating point values
numbers = array('d',[10.0,20.0,30.0])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('d', [10.0, 20.0, 30.0])

The example above imported the array module via from array import * and created an array numbers of float data type. This means that it holds only floating point numbers, which is specified with the 'd' typecode.

How to Find the Length of an Array in Python

To find out the exact number of elements contained in an array, use the built-in len() method.

It will return the integer number that is equal to the total number of elements in the array you specify.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(len(numbers))

#output
# 3

In the example above, the array contained three elements ‚Äď 10, 20, 30 ‚Äď so the length of numbers is 3.

Array Indexing and How to Access Individual Items in an Array in Python

Each item in an array has a specific address. Individual items are accessed by referencing their index number.

Indexing in Python, and in all programming languages and computing in general, starts at 0. It is important to remember that counting starts at 0 and not at 1.

To access an element, you first write the name of the array followed by square brackets. Inside the square brackets you include the item's index number.

The general syntax would look something like this:

array_name[index_value_of_item]

Here is how you would access each individual element in an array:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[0]) # gets the 1st element
print(numbers[1]) # gets the 2nd element
print(numbers[2]) # gets the 3rd element

#output

#10
#20
#30

Remember that the index value of the last element of an array is always one less than the length of the array. Where n is the length of the array, n - 1 will be the index value of the last item.

Note that you can also access each individual element using negative indexing.

With negative indexing, the last element would have an index of -1, the second to last element would have an index of -2, and so on.

Here is how you would get each item in an array using that method:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[-1]) #gets last item
print(numbers[-2]) #gets second to last item
print(numbers[-3]) #gets first item
 
#output

#30
#20
#10

How to Search Through an Array in Python

You can find out an element's index number by using the index() method.

You pass the value of the element being searched as the argument to the method, and the element's index number is returned.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

If there is more than one element with the same value, the index of the first instance of the value will be returned:

import array as arr 


numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
#will return the index number of the first instance of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

How to Loop through an Array in Python

You've seen how to access each individual element in an array and print it out on its own.

You've also seen how to print the array, using the print() method. That method gives the following result:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

What if you want to print each value one by one?

This is where a loop comes in handy. You can loop through the array and print out each value, one-by-one, with each loop iteration.

For this you can use a simple for loop:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

for number in numbers:
    print(number)
    
#output
#10
#20
#30

You could also use the range() function, and pass the len() method as its parameter. This would give the same result as above:

import array as arr  

values = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#prints each individual value in the array
for value in range(len(values)):
    print(values[value])

#output

#10
#20
#30

How to Slice an Array in Python

To access a specific range of values inside the array, use the slicing operator, which is a colon :.

When using the slicing operator and you only include one value, the counting starts from 0 by default. It gets the first item, and goes up to but not including the index number you specify.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#get the values 10 and 20 only
print(numbers[:2])  #first to second position

#output

#array('i', [10, 20])

When you pass two numbers as arguments, you specify a range of numbers. In this case, the counting starts at the position of the first number in the range, and up to but not including the second one:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


#get the values 20 and 30 only
print(numbers[1:3]) #second to third position

#output

#rray('i', [20, 30])

Methods For Performing Operations on Arrays in Python

Arrays are mutable, which means they are changeable. You can change the value of the different items, add new ones, or remove any you don't want in your program anymore.

Let's see some of the most commonly used methods which are used for performing operations on arrays.

How to Change the Value of an Item in an Array

You can change the value of a specific element by speficying its position and assigning it a new value:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#change the first element
#change it from having a value of 10 to having a value of 40
numbers[0] = 40

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 20, 30])

How to Add a New Value to an Array

To add one single value at the end of an array, use the append() method:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40])

Be aware that the new item you add needs to be the same data type as the rest of the items in the array.

Look what happens when I try to add a float to an array of integers:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40.0)

print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
#  File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 19, in <module>
#   numbers.append(40.0)
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

But what if you want to add more than one value to the end an array?

Use the extend() method, which takes an iterable (such as a list of items) as an argument. Again, make sure that the new items are all the same data type.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integers 40,50,60 to the end of numbers
#The numbers need to be enclosed in square brackets

numbers.extend([40,50,60])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60])

And what if you don't want to add an item to the end of an array? Use the insert() method, to add an item at a specific position.

The insert() function takes two arguments: the index number of the position the new element will be inserted, and the value of the new element.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 in the first position
#remember indexing starts at 0

numbers.insert(0,40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 10, 20, 30])

How to Remove a Value from an Array

To remove an element from an array, use the remove() method and include the value as an argument to the method.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30])

With remove(), only the first instance of the value you pass as an argument will be removed.

See what happens when there are more than one identical values:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Only the first occurence of 10 is removed.

You can also use the pop() method, and specify the position of the element to be removed:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

#remove the first instance of 10
numbers.pop(0)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Conclusion

And there you have it - you now know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Hopefully you found this guide helpful.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

#python #programming 

Connor Mills

Connor Mills

1670560264

Understanding Arrays in Python

Learn how to use Python arrays. Create arrays in Python using the array module. You'll see how to define them and the different methods commonly used for performing operations on them.
 

The artcile covers arrays that you create by importing the array module. We won't cover NumPy arrays here.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction to Arrays
    1. The differences between Lists and Arrays
    2. When to use arrays
  2. How to use arrays
    1. Define arrays
    2. Find the length of arrays
    3. Array indexing
    4. Search through arrays
    5. Loop through arrays
    6. Slice an array
  3. Array methods for performing operations
    1. Change an existing value
    2. Add a new value
    3. Remove a value
  4. Conclusion

Let's get started!


What are Python Arrays?

Arrays are a fundamental data structure, and an important part of most programming languages. In Python, they are containers which are able to store more than one item at the same time.

Specifically, they are an ordered collection of elements with every value being of the same data type. That is the most important thing to remember about Python arrays - the fact that they can only hold a sequence of multiple items that are of the same type.

What's the Difference between Python Lists and Python Arrays?

Lists are one of the most common data structures in Python, and a core part of the language.

Lists and arrays behave similarly.

Just like arrays, lists are an ordered sequence of elements.

They are also mutable and not fixed in size, which means they can grow and shrink throughout the life of the program. Items can be added and removed, making them very flexible to work with.

However, lists and arrays are not the same thing.

Lists store items that are of various data types. This means that a list can contain integers, floating point numbers, strings, or any other Python data type, at the same time. That is not the case with arrays.

As mentioned in the section above, arrays store only items that are of the same single data type. There are arrays that contain only integers, or only floating point numbers, or only any other Python data type you want to use.

When to Use Python Arrays

Lists are built into the Python programming language, whereas arrays aren't. Arrays are not a built-in data structure, and therefore need to be imported via the array module in order to be used.

Arrays of the array module are a thin wrapper over C arrays, and are useful when you want to work with homogeneous data.

They are also more compact and take up less memory and space which makes them more size efficient compared to lists.

If you want to perform mathematical calculations, then you should use NumPy arrays by importing the NumPy package. Besides that, you should just use Python arrays when you really need to, as lists work in a similar way and are more flexible to work with.

How to Use Arrays in Python

In order to create Python arrays, you'll first have to import the array module which contains all the necassary functions.

There are three ways you can import the array module:

  1. By using import array at the top of the file. This includes the module array. You would then go on to create an array using array.array().
import array

#how you would create an array
array.array()
  1. Instead of having to type array.array() all the time, you could use import array as arr at the top of the file, instead of import array alone. You would then create an array by typing arr.array(). The arr acts as an alias name, with the array constructor then immediately following it.
import array as arr

#how you would create an array
arr.array()
  1. Lastly, you could also use from array import *, with * importing all the functionalities available. You would then create an array by writing the array() constructor alone.
from array import *

#how you would create an array
array()

How to Define Arrays in Python

Once you've imported the array module, you can then go on to define a Python array.

The general syntax for creating an array looks like this:

variable_name = array(typecode,[elements])

Let's break it down:

  • variable_name would be the name of the array.
  • The typecode specifies what kind of elements would be stored in the array. Whether it would be an array of integers, an array of floats or an array of any other Python data type. Remember that all elements should be of the same data type.
  • Inside square brackets you mention the elements that would be stored in the array, with each element being separated by a comma. You can also create an empty array by just writing variable_name = array(typecode) alone, without any elements.

Below is a typecode table, with the different typecodes that can be used with the different data types when defining Python arrays:

TYPECODEC TYPEPYTHON TYPESIZE
'b'signed charint1
'B'unsigned charint1
'u'wchar_tUnicode character2
'h'signed shortint2
'H'unsigned shortint2
'i'signed intint2
'I'unsigned intint2
'l'signed longint4
'L'unsigned longint4
'q'signed long longint8
'Q'unsigned long longint8
'f'floatfloat4
'd'doublefloat8

Tying everything together, here is an example of how you would define an array in Python:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

Let's break it down:

  • First we included the array module, in this case with import array as arr .
  • Then, we created a numbers array.
  • We used arr.array() because of import array as arr .
  • Inside the array() constructor, we first included i, for signed integer. Signed integer means that the array can include positive and negative values. Unsigned integer, with H for example, would mean that no negative values are allowed.
  • Lastly, we included the values to be stored in the array in square brackets.

Keep in mind that if you tried to include values that were not of i typecode, meaning they were not integer values, you would get an error:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])


print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
# File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 14, in <module>
#   numbers = arr.array('i',[10.0,20,30])
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

In the example above, I tried to include a floating point number in the array. I got an error because this is meant to be an integer array only.

Another way to create an array is the following:

from array import *

#an array of floating point values
numbers = array('d',[10.0,20.0,30.0])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('d', [10.0, 20.0, 30.0])

The example above imported the array module via from array import * and created an array numbers of float data type. This means that it holds only floating point numbers, which is specified with the 'd' typecode.

How to Find the Length of an Array in Python

To find out the exact number of elements contained in an array, use the built-in len() method.

It will return the integer number that is equal to the total number of elements in the array you specify.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


print(len(numbers))

#output
# 3

In the example above, the array contained three elements ‚Äď 10, 20, 30 ‚Äď so the length of numbers is 3.

Array Indexing and How to Access Individual Items in an Array in Python

Each item in an array has a specific address. Individual items are accessed by referencing their index number.

Indexing in Python, and in all programming languages and computing in general, starts at 0. It is important to remember that counting starts at 0 and not at 1.

To access an element, you first write the name of the array followed by square brackets. Inside the square brackets you include the item's index number.

The general syntax would look something like this:

array_name[index_value_of_item]

Here is how you would access each individual element in an array:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[0]) # gets the 1st element
print(numbers[1]) # gets the 2nd element
print(numbers[2]) # gets the 3rd element

#output

#10
#20
#30

Remember that the index value of the last element of an array is always one less than the length of the array. Where n is the length of the array, n - 1 will be the index value of the last item.

Note that you can also access each individual element using negative indexing.

With negative indexing, the last element would have an index of -1, the second to last element would have an index of -2, and so on.

Here is how you would get each item in an array using that method:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers[-1]) #gets last item
print(numbers[-2]) #gets second to last item
print(numbers[-3]) #gets first item
 
#output

#30
#20
#10

How to Search Through an Array in Python

You can find out an element's index number by using the index() method.

You pass the value of the element being searched as the argument to the method, and the element's index number is returned.

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

If there is more than one element with the same value, the index of the first instance of the value will be returned:

import array as arr 


numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20,30])

#search for the index of the value 10
#will return the index number of the first instance of the value 10
print(numbers.index(10))

#output

#0

How to Loop through an Array in Python

You've seen how to access each individual element in an array and print it out on its own.

You've also seen how to print the array, using the print() method. That method gives the following result:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30])

What if you want to print each value one by one?

This is where a loop comes in handy. You can loop through the array and print out each value, one-by-one, with each loop iteration.

For this you can use a simple for loop:

import array as arr 

numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

for number in numbers:
    print(number)
    
#output
#10
#20
#30

You could also use the range() function, and pass the len() method as its parameter. This would give the same result as above:

import array as arr  

values = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#prints each individual value in the array
for value in range(len(values)):
    print(values[value])

#output

#10
#20
#30

How to Slice an Array in Python

To access a specific range of values inside the array, use the slicing operator, which is a colon :.

When using the slicing operator and you only include one value, the counting starts from 0 by default. It gets the first item, and goes up to but not including the index number you specify.


import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#get the values 10 and 20 only
print(numbers[:2])  #first to second position

#output

#array('i', [10, 20])

When you pass two numbers as arguments, you specify a range of numbers. In this case, the counting starts at the position of the first number in the range, and up to but not including the second one:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])


#get the values 20 and 30 only
print(numbers[1:3]) #second to third position

#output

#rray('i', [20, 30])

Methods For Performing Operations on Arrays in Python

Arrays are mutable, which means they are changeable. You can change the value of the different items, add new ones, or remove any you don't want in your program anymore.

Let's see some of the most commonly used methods which are used for performing operations on arrays.

How to Change the Value of an Item in an Array

You can change the value of a specific element by speficying its position and assigning it a new value:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#change the first element
#change it from having a value of 10 to having a value of 40
numbers[0] = 40

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 20, 30])

How to Add a New Value to an Array

To add one single value at the end of an array, use the append() method:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40])

Be aware that the new item you add needs to be the same data type as the rest of the items in the array.

Look what happens when I try to add a float to an array of integers:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 to the end of numbers
numbers.append(40.0)

print(numbers)

#output

#Traceback (most recent call last):
#  File "/Users/dionysialemonaki/python_articles/demo.py", line 19, in <module>
#   numbers.append(40.0)
#TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an integer

But what if you want to add more than one value to the end an array?

Use the extend() method, which takes an iterable (such as a list of items) as an argument. Again, make sure that the new items are all the same data type.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integers 40,50,60 to the end of numbers
#The numbers need to be enclosed in square brackets

numbers.extend([40,50,60])

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60])

And what if you don't want to add an item to the end of an array? Use the insert() method, to add an item at a specific position.

The insert() function takes two arguments: the index number of the position the new element will be inserted, and the value of the new element.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

#add the integer 40 in the first position
#remember indexing starts at 0

numbers.insert(0,40)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [40, 10, 20, 30])

How to Remove a Value from an Array

To remove an element from an array, use the remove() method and include the value as an argument to the method.

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30])

With remove(), only the first instance of the value you pass as an argument will be removed.

See what happens when there are more than one identical values:


import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

numbers.remove(10)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Only the first occurence of 10 is removed.

You can also use the pop() method, and specify the position of the element to be removed:

import array as arr 

#original array
numbers = arr.array('i',[10,20,30,10,20])

#remove the first instance of 10
numbers.pop(0)

print(numbers)

#output

#array('i', [20, 30, 10, 20])

Conclusion

And there you have it - you now know the basics of how to create arrays in Python using the array module. Hopefully you found this guide helpful.

You'll start from the basics and learn in an interacitve and beginner-friendly way. You'll also build five projects at the end to put into practice and help reinforce what you learned.

Thanks for reading and happy coding!

Original article source at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#python 

Rui  Silva

Rui Silva

1641884883

Como anexar A Uma Lista Ou Matriz Em Python Como Um Profissional

Neste artigo, voc√™ aprender√° sobre o .append()m√©todo em Python. Voc√™ tamb√©m ver√° como .append()difere de outros m√©todos usados ‚Äč‚Äčpara adicionar elementos a listas.

Vamos começar!

O que são listas em Python? Uma definição para iniciantes

Uma matriz na programação é uma coleção ordenada de itens e todos os itens precisam ser do mesmo tipo de dados.

No entanto, ao contrário de outras linguagens de programação, os arrays não são uma estrutura de dados embutida no Python. Em vez de arrays tradicionais, o Python usa listas.

Listas s√£o essencialmente arrays din√Ęmicos e s√£o uma das estruturas de dados mais comuns e poderosas em Python.

Você pode pensar neles como contêineres ordenados. Eles armazenam e organizam tipos semelhantes de dados relacionados juntos.

Os elementos armazenados em uma lista podem ser de qualquer tipo de dados.

Pode haver listas de inteiros (n√ļmeros inteiros), listas de floats (n√ļmeros de ponto flutuante), listas de strings (texto) e listas de qualquer outro tipo de dados interno do Python.

Embora seja possível que as listas contenham apenas itens do mesmo tipo de dados, elas são mais flexíveis do que as matrizes tradicionais. Isso significa que pode haver uma variedade de tipos de dados diferentes dentro da mesma lista.

As listas têm 0 ou mais itens, o que significa que também pode haver listas vazias. Dentro de uma lista também pode haver valores duplicados.

Os valores são separados por uma vírgula e colocados entre colchetes, [].

Como criar listas em Python

Para criar uma nova lista, primeiro dê um nome à lista. Em seguida, adicione o operador de atribuição ( =) e um par de colchetes de abertura e fechamento. Dentro dos colchetes, adicione os valores que você deseja que a lista contenha.

#create a new list of names
names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#print the list to the console
print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny']

Como as listas s√£o indexadas em Python

As listas mantêm uma ordem para cada item.

Cada item na cole√ß√£o tem seu pr√≥prio n√ļmero de √≠ndice, que voc√™ pode usar para acessar o pr√≥prio item.

√ćndices em Python (e em qualquer outra linguagem de programa√ß√£o moderna) come√ßam em 0 e aumentam para cada item da lista.

Por exemplo, a lista criada anteriormente tinha 4 valores:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

O primeiro valor na lista, "Jimmy", tem um índice de 0.

O segundo valor na lista, "Timmy", tem um índice de 1.

O terceiro valor na lista, "Kenny", tem um índice de 2.

O quarto valor na lista, "Lenny", tem um índice de 3.

Para acessar um elemento na lista por seu n√ļmero de √≠ndice, primeiro escreva o nome da lista, depois entre colchetes escreva o inteiro do √≠ndice do elemento.

Por exemplo, se você quisesse acessar o elemento que tem um índice de 2, você faria:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

print(names[2])

#output
#Kenny

Listas em Python s√£o mut√°veis

Em Python, quando os objetos s√£o mut√°veis , significa que seus valores podem ser alterados depois de criados.

As listas são objetos mutáveis, portanto, você pode atualizá-las e alterá-las depois de criadas.

As listas tamb√©m s√£o din√Ęmicas, o que significa que podem crescer e diminuir ao longo da vida de um programa.

Os itens podem ser removidos de uma lista existente e novos itens podem ser adicionados a uma lista existente.

Existem métodos internos para adicionar e remover itens de listas.

Por exemplo, para add itens, há as .append(), .insert()e .extend()métodos.

Para remove itens, há as .remove(), .pop()e .pop(index)métodos.

O que o .append()método faz?

O .append()método adiciona um elemento adicional ao final de uma lista já existente.

A sintaxe geral se parece com isso:

list_name.append(item)

Vamos decomp√ī-lo:

  • list_name √© o nome que voc√™ deu √† lista.
  • .append()√© o m√©todo de lista para adicionar um item ao final de list_name.
  • item √© o item individual especificado que voc√™ deseja adicionar.

Ao usar .append(), a lista original é modificada. Nenhuma nova lista é criada.

Se você quiser adicionar um nome extra à lista criada anteriormente, faça o seguinte:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add the name Dylan to the end of the list
names.append("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'Dylan']

Qual é a diferença entre os métodos .append()e .insert()?

A diferença entre os dois métodos é que .append()adiciona um item ao final de uma lista, enquanto .insert()insere um item em uma posição especificada na lista.

Como você viu na seção anterior, .append()irá adicionar o item que você passar como argumento para a função sempre no final da lista.

Se você não quiser apenas adicionar itens ao final de uma lista, poderá especificar a posição com a qual deseja adicioná-los .insert().

A sintaxe geral fica assim:

list_name.insert(position,item)

Vamos decomp√ī-lo:

  • list_name √© o nome da lista.
  • .insert() √© o m√©todo de lista para inserir um item em uma lista.
  • position√© o primeiro argumento para o m√©todo. √Č sempre um n√ļmero inteiro - especificamente √© o n√ļmero de √≠ndice da posi√ß√£o onde voc√™ deseja que o novo item seja colocado.
  • item√© o segundo argumento para o m√©todo. Aqui voc√™ especifica o novo item que deseja adicionar √† lista.

Por exemplo, digamos que você tenha a seguinte lista de linguagens de programação:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java', 'C++']

Se você quisesse inserir "Python" no início da lista, como um novo item da lista, você usaria o .insert()método e especificaria a posição como 0. (Lembre-se de que o primeiro valor em uma lista sempre tem um índice de 0.)

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

programming_languages.insert(0, "Python")

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['Python', 'JavaScript', 'Java', 'C++']

Se, em vez disso, você quisesse que "JavaScript" fosse o primeiro item da lista e, em seguida, adicionasse "Python" como o novo item, você especificaria a posição como 1:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java", "C++"]

programming_languages.insert(1,"Python")

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Python', 'Java', 'C++']

O .insert()método oferece um pouco mais de flexibilidade em comparação com o .append()método que apenas adiciona um novo item ao final da lista.

Qual é a diferença entre os métodos .append()e .extend()?

E se você quiser adicionar mais de um item a uma lista de uma só vez, em vez de adicioná-los um de cada vez?

Você pode usar o .append()método para adicionar mais de um item ao final de uma lista.

Digamos que você tenha uma lista que contém apenas duas linguagens de programação:

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java"]

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java']

Você então deseja adicionar mais dois idiomas, no final dele.

Nesse caso, você passa uma lista contendo os dois novos valores que deseja adicionar, como argumento para .append():

programming_languages = ["JavaScript", "Java"]

#add two new items to the end of the list
programming_languages.append(["Python","C++"])

print(programming_languages)

#output
#['JavaScript', 'Java', ['Python', 'C++']]

Se você observar mais de perto a saída acima, ['JavaScript', 'Java', ['Python', 'C++']], verá que uma nova lista foi adicionada ao final da lista já existente.

Ent√£o, .append() adiciona uma lista dentro de uma lista .

Listas s√£o objetos, e quando voc√™ usa .append()para adicionar outra lista em uma lista, os novos itens ser√£o adicionados como um √ļnico objeto (item).

Digamos que você já tenha duas listas, assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

E se voc√™ quiser combinar o conte√ļdo de ambas as listas em uma, adicionando o conte√ļdo de more_namesa names?

Quando o .append()método é usado para essa finalidade, outra lista é criada dentro de names:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add contents of more_names to names
names.append(more_names)

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', ['Kenny', 'Lenny']]

Ent√£o, .append()adiciona os novos elementos como outra lista, anexando o objeto ao final.

Para realmente concatenar (adicionar) listas e combinar todos os itens de uma lista para outra , você precisa usar o .extend()método.

A sintaxe geral fica assim:

list_name.extend(iterable/other_list_name)

Vamos decomp√ī-lo:

  • list_name √© o nome de uma das listas.
  • .extend() √© o m√©todo para adicionar todo o conte√ļdo de uma lista a outra.
  • iterablepode ser qualquer iter√°vel, como outra lista, por exemplo, another_list_name. Nesse caso, another_list_name√© uma lista que ser√° concatenada com list_name, e seu conte√ļdo ser√° adicionado um a um ao final de list_name, como itens separados.

Então, tomando o exemplo anterior, quando .append()for substituído por .extend(), a saída ficará assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy"]
more_names = ["Kenny", "Lenny"]

names.extend(more_names)

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny']

Quando usamos .extend(), a nameslista foi estendida e seu comprimento aumentado em 2.

A maneira como .extend()funciona é que ele pega uma lista (ou outro iterável) como argumento, itera sobre cada elemento e, em seguida, cada elemento no iterável é adicionado à lista.

Há outra diferença entre .append()e .extend().

Quando voc√™ deseja adicionar uma string, como visto anteriormente, .append()adiciona o item inteiro e √ļnico ao final da lista:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#add the name Dylan to the end of the list
names.append("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'Dylan']

Se, em .extend()vez disso, você adicionasse uma string ao final de uma lista, cada caractere na string seria adicionado como um item individual à lista.

Isso ocorre porque as strings s√£o iter√°veis ‚Äč‚Äče .extend()iteram sobre o argumento iter√°vel passado para ela.

Ent√£o, o exemplo acima ficaria assim:

names = ["Jimmy", "Timmy", "Kenny", "Lenny"]

#pass a string(iterable) to .extend()
names.extend("Dylan")

print(names)

#output
#['Jimmy', 'Timmy', 'Kenny', 'Lenny', 'D', 'y', 'l', 'a', 'n']

Conclus√£o

Resumindo, o .append()método é usado para adicionar um item ao final de uma lista existente, sem criar uma nova lista.

Quando é usado para adicionar uma lista a outra lista, cria uma lista dentro de uma lista.

Se você quiser saber mais sobre Python, confira a Certificação Python do freeCodeCamp . Você começará a aprender de maneira interativa e amigável para iniciantes. Você também construirá cinco projetos no final para colocar em prática o que aprendeu.


fonte: https://www.freecodecamp.org

#python 

matrix multiplication in python user input

Given two user input matrix. Our task is to display the addition of two matrix. In these problem we use nested List comprehensive.

matrix multiplication in python user input

Algorithm

Step1: input two matrix.

Step 2: nested for loops to iterate through each row and each column.

Step 3: take one resultant matrix which is initially contains all 0. Then we multiply each row elements of first matrix with each elements of second matrix, then add all multiplied value. That is the value of resultant matrix.

Example Code

# Program to multiply two matrices
A=[]
n=int(input("Enter N for N x N matrix: "))         
print("Enter the element ::>")
for i in range(n): 
   row=[]                                      #temporary list to store the row
   for j in range(n): 
      row.append(int(input()))           #add the input to row list
      A.append(row)                      #add the row to the list
print(A)
# [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
#Display the 2D array
print("Display Array In Matrix Form")
for i in range(n):
   for j in range(n):
      print(A[i][j], end=" ")
   print()                                        #new line
B=[]
n=int(input("Enter N for N x N matrix : "))           #3 here
#use list for storing 2D array
#get the user input and store it in list (here IN : 1 to 9)
print("Enter the element ::>")
for i in range (n): 
   row=[]                                      #temporary list to store the row
   for j in range(n): 
      row.append(int(input()))           #add the input to row list
      B.append(row)                       #add the row to the list
print(B)
# [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
#Display the 2D array
print("Display Array In Matrix Form")
for i in range(n):
   for j in range(n):
      print(B[i][j], end=" ")
   print()                                           
result = [[0,0,0], [0,0,0], [0,0,0]] 
for i in range(len(A)): 
   for j in range(len(B[0])): 
      for k in range(len(B)): 
         result[i][j] += A[i][k] * B[k][j] 
print("The Resultant Matrix Is ::>")
for r in result: 
   print(r) 

Output

Enter N for N x N matrix: 3
Enter the element ::>
2
1
4
2
1
2
3
4
3
[[2, 1, 4], [2, 1, 2], [3, 4, 3]]
Display Array In Matrix Form
2 1 4 
2 1 2 
3 4 3 
Enter N for N x N matrix : 3
Enter the element ::>
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
Display Array In Matrix Form
1 2 3 
4 5 6 
7 8 9 
The Resultant Matrix Is ::>
[34, 41, 48]
[20, 25, 30]
[40, 50, 60]

https://www.pakainfo.com/python-program-multiplication-of-two-matrix-from-user-input/