Credit Karma's Head of DEI, Ash Coleman, discusses Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity

As the New York Times best-selling author, Brené Brown says, “Leadership is not about titles or the corner office. It’s about the willingness to step up, put yourself out there, and lean into courage.” In today’s cultural and work environment, we’re no longer able to avoid sensitive and pressing issues, but many leaders are paralyzed by the fear of making mistakes in the way they address them. This is especially true when it comes to addressing concerns around diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI).

That’s why our host, Federico Toledo, wraps up season three of Quality Sense with an illuminating interview with a leader in the DEI space.

#testing #credit karma's head #diversity #equity

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Credit Karma's Head of DEI, Ash Coleman, discusses Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity

Credit Karma's Head of DEI, Ash Coleman, discusses Diversity, Equity, and Inclusivity

As the New York Times best-selling author, Brené Brown says, “Leadership is not about titles or the corner office. It’s about the willingness to step up, put yourself out there, and lean into courage.” In today’s cultural and work environment, we’re no longer able to avoid sensitive and pressing issues, but many leaders are paralyzed by the fear of making mistakes in the way they address them. This is especially true when it comes to addressing concerns around diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI).

That’s why our host, Federico Toledo, wraps up season three of Quality Sense with an illuminating interview with a leader in the DEI space.

#testing #credit karma's head #diversity #equity

Inclusive Interviewing Best Practices

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Your company or organization might not be in a position right now to do much (if any) hiring. However, now is a great time to reassess your interviewing guidelines and practices (or create some if you don’t have anything official already) so you are in a better position in the future when hiring kicks back up again.

Inclusive interviewing is one piece to a larger discussion around inclusive environments and inclusive work cultures. I’ll write more on those larger topics later. Here we will focus in on the interviewing portion.


What does inclusion mean? Merriam-Webster defines it as the following:

_the act of including**: _**_the state of being _included

the act or practice of including and accommodating people who have historically been excluded (as because of their race, gender, sexuality, or ability)

Applying inclusive principles to hiring might have you thinking this only applies to recruiting and supporting diverse candidates. And while, it’s true that this will help with recruiting and hiring more diverse folks, these practices actually help everyone.

The principles below can be applied to any interview process for roles within and outside of STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics) industries.

Inclusive Interviewing Principles

Inclusive Language

Be mindful of the language you are using when drafting the job description and the ultimate job posting. This will color how someone views what, and WHO, you are looking for in this role. Swap out specific pronouns like “he” or “she” for more inclusive generic ones like “they”. While terms like “rockstar” or “ninja” can sound cool and hip to describe your ideal candidate, they are best avoided in your descriptions as they can often dissuade non-male genders from applying.

Continue this mindfulness of the language you use throughout this process (and always!). Respect the pronouns and language individuals use for themselves.

Avoid the following:

  • Statements or imagery that perpetuate stereotypes (e.g. “pow wow”, “hold down the fort”, “that’s so gay”, “that’s ghetto”)
  • Idioms, jargon, and acronyms which might be specific to your company or require knowledge of sports or culture which is exclusionary to folks from different backgrounds (provide an explanation if you must use any of these)
  • Non-gender neutral terms (e.g. using the word “guys” to refer to a room or group of people regardless of the gender(s) present)

Stick with open and inclusive terms as much as possible.

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https://www.uua.org/lgbtq/welcoming/ways/200008.shtml

Do your best to stick with positive, affirming terms vs negative terms.

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https://open.buffer.com/inclusive-language-tech/

Unconscious Bias

Be mindful of unconscious bias within yourself and your interview team. Don’t worry, it’s natural. We all have unconscious biases. How we pay attention to them and what we do with them is what really matters.

There are lots of biases (unconscious and conscious ones) but Harver identifies 13 ones that impact hiring. Become aware of what these are and watch out for them so they don’t trip you up and lose out on hiring a great candidate.

#interviewing #hiring #inclusion #diversity-and-inclusion #diversity

How to Making A Simple Credit Card Validation form

In this quick tutorial we will show you how to create a simple credit card form. We'll build the whole thing from scratch, with a little help from Bootstrap 3 for the interface, and Payform.js for client-side form validation.

Project Overview

Here is a sneak-peak of what we will be building in this tutorial:

credit-card-form.png

Credit Card Form Demo

You can get the full code for this project from the Download button near the top of the article. An overview of the files can be seen below:

project-overview.png

There are two .css files and two .js files which we will need to include in our HTML. All other resources such as the Bootstrap framework, jQuery, and web fonts will be included externally via CDN.

index.html

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <title>Credit Card Validation Demo</title>

    <link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans" rel="stylesheet">
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="http://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="assets/css/styles.css">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="assets/css/demo.css">
</head>

<body>

    <!-- The HTML for our form will go here -->

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.12.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script src="assets/js/jquery.payform.min.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    <script src="assets/js/script.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

Now that everything is set up, we can start building our credit card form. Let's start with the HTML layout!

Layout

A credit card dialog needs to be simple, short, and straightforward. Here are the four input fields that every credit card form needs to have:

  • Credit card owner name
  • Card number
  • Secret code (also known as CVV/CVC/CID)
  • Expiration Date

All we need to do is create a <form> and add all the required input fields. For the owner, card number, and CVV we will use simple text fields. For the expiration date we'll put a combination of two selects with predefined options.

Besides that our form will have a heading, a submit button, and images for popular credit card vendors. Since we are working with Bootstrap there is a little extra markup, but it helps keep the code organized and the layout responsive.

<div class="creditCardForm">
    <div class="heading">
        <h1>Confirm Purchase</h1>
    </div>
    <div class="payment">
        <form>
            <div class="form-group owner">
                <label for="owner">Owner</label>
                <input type="text" class="form-control" id="owner">
            </div>
            <div class="form-group CVV">
                <label for="cvv">CVV</label>
                <input type="text" class="form-control" id="cvv">
            </div>
            <div class="form-group" id="card-number-field">
                <label for="cardNumber">Card Number</label>
                <input type="text" class="form-control" id="cardNumber">
            </div>
            <div class="form-group" id="expiration-date">
                <label>Expiration Date</label>
                <select>
                    <option value="01">January</option>
                    <option value="02">February </option>
                    <option value="03">March</option>
                    <option value="04">April</option>
                    <option value="05">May</option>
                    <option value="06">June</option>
                    <option value="07">July</option>
                    <option value="08">August</option>
                    <option value="09">September</option>
                    <option value="10">October</option>
                    <option value="11">November</option>
                    <option value="12">December</option>
                </select>
                <select>
                    <option value="16"> 2016</option>
                    <option value="17"> 2017</option>
                    <option value="18"> 2018</option>
                    <option value="19"> 2019</option>
                    <option value="20"> 2020</option>
                    <option value="21"> 2021</option>
                </select>
            </div>
            <div class="form-group" id="credit_cards">
                <img src="assets/images/visa.jpg" id="visa">
                <img src="assets/images/mastercard.jpg" id="mastercard">
                <img src="assets/images/amex.jpg" id="amex">
            </div>
            <div class="form-group" id="pay-now">
                <button type="submit" class="btn btn-default" id="confirm-purchase">Confirm</button>
            </div>
        </form>
    </div>
</div>

Now that we have the needed input fields, we can setup the validation rules.

Validation

All of the validation we will show here is client side and done exclusively in the JavaScript. If it is HTML validation that you are interested in, check out this article.

To kick things off we will define all the jQuery selectors we will need:

var owner = $('#owner'),
    cardNumber = $('#cardNumber'),
    cardNumberField = $('#card-number-field'),
    CVV = $("#cvv"),
    mastercard = $("#mastercard"),
    confirmButton = $('#confirm-purchase'),
    visa = $("#visa"),
    amex = $("#amex");

Then, using Payform.js, we will turn our basic input fields into specialized input for credit card data. We simply need to call the right function and the library will automatically handle text formatting and maximum string length for us:

cardNumber.payform('formatCardNumber'); CVV.payform('formatCardCVC');

Next, we want to be able to give real-time feedback to users while they are typing in their card number. To do so we will write a simple function that does two things:

  1. Check if the current text in the field is а valid card number or not. Add appropriate coloring to the text field.
  2. Depending on the present input characters, see if the card is either Visa, MasterCard, or American Express. This is done using the payform.parseCardType() method.

Since we want to execute the above actions every time a new character is typed in, we will use the jQuery keyup() event listener.

cardNumber.keyup(function() {
    amex.removeClass('transparent');
    visa.removeClass('transparent');
    mastercard.removeClass('transparent');

    if ($.payform.validateCardNumber(cardNumber.val()) == false) {
        cardNumberField.removeClass('has-success');
        cardNumberField.addClass('has-error');
    } else {
        cardNumberField.removeClass('has-error');
        cardNumberField.addClass('has-success');
    }

    if ($.payform.parseCardType(cardNumber.val()) == 'visa') {
        mastercard.addClass('transparent');
        amex.addClass('transparent');
    } else if ($.payform.parseCardType(cardNumber.val()) == 'amex') {
        mastercard.addClass('transparent');
        visa.addClass('transparent');
    } else if ($.payform.parseCardType(cardNumber.val()) == 'mastercard') {
        amex.addClass('transparent');
        visa.addClass('transparent');
    }
});

There is one more thing we have to do and that is is check if all the field are holding valid data when the user tries to submit the form.

Name validation can be quite tricky. To keep this tutorial light, we won't be going into that subject, and we will only check if the input name is at least 5 characters long. Payform provides us with the needed methods for validating the rest of the form.

confirmButton.click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    var isCardValid = $.payform.validateCardNumber(cardNumber.val());
    var isCvvValid = $.payform.validateCardCVC(CVV.val());

    if(owner.val().length < 5){
        alert("Wrong owner name");
    } else if (!isCardValid) {
        alert("Wrong card number");
    } else if (!isCvvValid) {
        alert("Wrong CVV");
    } else {
        // Everything is correct. Add your form submission code here.
        alert("Everything is correct");
    }
});

The above validation is for educational purposes only and shouldn't be used on commercial projects. Always include both client-side and server-side validation to your forms, especially when working with credit card data.

Styles

We are using Bootstrap, so most of the styling is done by the framework. Our CSS mostly covers the size of the input fields and various padding, margin and font tweaks.

styles.css

.creditCardForm {
    max-width: 700px;
    background-color: #fff;
    margin: 100px auto;
    overflow: hidden;
    padding: 25px;
    color: #4c4e56;
}
.creditCardForm label {
    width: 100%;
    margin-bottom: 10px;
}
.creditCardForm .heading h1 {
    text-align: center;
    font-family: 'Open Sans', sans-serif;
    color: #4c4e56;
}
.creditCardForm .payment {
    float: left;
    font-size: 18px;
    padding: 10px 25px;
    margin-top: 20px;
    position: relative;
}
.creditCardForm .payment .form-group {
    float: left;
    margin-bottom: 15px;
}
.creditCardForm .payment .form-control {
    line-height: 40px;
    height: auto;
    padding: 0 16px;
}
.creditCardForm .owner {
    width: 63%;
    margin-right: 10px;
}
.creditCardForm .CVV {
    width: 35%;
}
.creditCardForm #card-number-field {
    width: 100%;
}
.creditCardForm #expiration-date {
    width: 49%;
}
.creditCardForm #credit_cards {
    width: 50%;
    margin-top: 25px;
    text-align: right;
}
.creditCardForm #pay-now {
    width: 100%;
    margin-top: 25px;
}
.creditCardForm .payment .btn {
    width: 100%;
    margin-top: 3px;
    font-size: 24px;
    background-color: #2ec4a5;
    color: white;
}
.creditCardForm .payment select {
    padding: 10px;
    margin-right: 15px;
}
.transparent {
    opacity: 0.2;
}
@media(max-width: 650px) {
    .creditCardForm .owner,
    .creditCardForm .CVV,
    .creditCardForm #expiration-date,
    .creditCardForm #credit_cards {
        width: 100%;
    }
    .creditCardForm #credit_cards {
        text-align: left;
    }
}

With this our Credit Card Validation Form is complete!

Original article source at: https://tutorialzine.com/

#validation #card 

Julie  Donnelly

Julie Donnelly

1598847060

Racial Equity at Work Isn’t Rocket Science

The past three weeks have been disorienting.

In the wake of the civil unrest after the murder of George Floyd and the subsequent heightened racial tension, companies across the country (and the world) have developed a seemingly newfound sense of urgency when it comes to solving their lack of racial representation and inclusion.

From Twitter to Ben & Jerry’s, it’s been interesting to watch brands publish statements denouncing racism and inequity.

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Photo from Ben & Jerry’s.

DEI consultants like myself have become inundated with inquiries from HR and business leaders who want to talk about rolling out diversity training to their employees and creating a long-term approach to diversity, equity, and inclusion overall.

Black employees have been brought into conference rooms to get a “pulse check” on “how they’re doing” and how their white counterparts can “help.”

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Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash.

Even with all of this activity, until there are systemic changes in the way our workplaces are structured — complete with a total shunning of the status quo — absolutely nothing will change.

Believe it or not, building an anti-racist workplace — one where white supremacy isn’t tolerated or upheld — isn’t rocket science.

Is it uncomfortable?

Yes.

Is it counter to what white people have likely grown accustomed to?

Absolutely.

But is it very difficult to learn or understand?

Not at all.

And yet, the vibe coming from most leaders and HR professionals makes it seem like the problem of racial inequity in the workplace is too hard to solve.

#inclusion #diversity-in-tech #diversity-and-inclusion #programming #racism #data science

Simpliv LLC

Simpliv LLC

1582888604

Workplace Diversity: Inclusion & Diversity Employee Training | Simpliv

Course Overview

With the world becoming more mobile and diverse, diversity has taken on a new importance in the workplace. Your participants will be able to use strategies for removing barriers and stereotypes, and to encourage diversity in the workplace and even through their community.

The Workplace Diversity course will help participants understand what diversity is all about, and how they can help create a more diverse world at work and at home. They will be instructed to use skills such as active listening to receive messages in a diverse population, employ effective questioning techniques, and communicate with strength.

Diversity relates to gender, age, linguistic and cultural background, disability, religious belief and pregnancy and family responsibilities. Diversity also refers to the many other ways we are different in other respects such as educational background, socio-economic background, personality profile, geographic location, marital status, etc.

#Workplace Diversity #Inclusion & Diversity Employee Trainin #humanresources #Employee Training