Advanced Morse Code Decoder in Python

Advanced Morse Code Decoder in Python

In this post, we will improve our simple Morse Code Decoder to be able to decipher sentences as well. Furthermore, we can implement checks in the decoder to inform us of the frequencies in which each alphabet/number, word, or sentence type have been decoded.

In one of my previous post, I’ve designed a simple Morse Code Decoder in Python which is capable of accepting user inputs and outputting them in their original alphanumerical form. One of the limitations of the decoder is that it does not allow the user to input sentences. Remember that we have chosen to represent each alphabet or number using a series of ‘0’ and ‘1’, where ‘0’ represents a dot, and ‘1’ represents a dash. Each alphabet or number is then separated by a ‘*’ in our decoder, as shown in the screenshot below.

In this post, we will improve our simple Morse Code Decoder to be able to decipher sentences as well. Furthermore, we can implement checks in the decoder to inform us of the frequencies in which each alphabet/number, word, or sentence type have been decoded.

Building the Decoder Class

One major difference between this decoder and the previous one is that we will be using Python class to build our decoder and the respective analysis checks. A simple explanation about Python class is that it defines a set of _instance variables _(data values to be represented for each object) and a set of _methods _(operations) that can be applied to the objects.

We will build a class called Decoder *and it will contain several methods, with the first being *init(self). This is the essential method for object creation and it usually initialize the values of the instance variables of each object. Remember that we chose to use a dictionary structure to store our Morse Code representation in Python, where each alphabet or number is represented by a series of ‘0’s and ‘1’s. As we are adding sentences analysis checks too, we have also added three punctuation marks “ _. _” , “ _, _” and “ _? _”.

class Decoder:

    def __init__(self):
        self.the_dict = dict(zip(('A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K','L','M','N','O','P','Q','R','S','T','U','V','W','X','Y','Z','0','1','2','3','4','5','6','7','8','9','.',',','?'),('01','1000','1010','100','0','0010','110','0000','00','0111','101','0100','11','10','111','0110','1101','010','000','1','001','0001','011','1001','1011','1100','11111','01111','00111','00011','00001','00000','10000','11000','11100','11110','010101','110011','001100')))

The next essential method in a class creation is returning/printing the output. With just the init (self) *method, we cannot display any results if we assign a variable to this class. We will add a *str *(self) *method which works the same way as *print(variable), *but allows us to customize the way the results will be displayed.

def __str__ (self):
        dict_str = ""
        for key,value in self.the_dict.items():
            dict_str += "Character: " + str(key) + " ->" + " Code: " + str(value) + "\n"
        return dict_str

data-science object-oriented data-analysis python morse-code

Bootstrap 5 Complete Course with Examples

Bootstrap 5 Tutorial - Bootstrap 5 Crash Course for Beginners

Nest.JS Tutorial for Beginners

Hello Vue 3: A First Look at Vue 3 and the Composition API

Building a simple Applications with Vue 3

Deno Crash Course: Explore Deno and Create a full REST API with Deno

How to Build a Real-time Chat App with Deno and WebSockets

Convert HTML to Markdown Online

HTML entity encoder decoder Online

How to Find Ulimit For user on Linux

Explains how to find ulimit values of currently running process or given user account under Linux using the 'ulimit -a' builtin command.

MEAN Stack Tutorial MongoDB ExpressJS AngularJS NodeJS

MEAN Stack Tutorial MongoDB ExpressJS AngularJS NodeJS - We are going to build a full stack Todo App using the MEAN (MongoDB, ExpressJS, AngularJS and NodeJS). This is the last part of three-post series tutorial.

Docker Applikationen mit Visual Studio Code debuggen

Mit dem integrierten Debugger von Visual Studio Code lassen sich ASP.NET Core bzw. .NET Core Applikationen einfach und problemlos debuggen. Der Debugger unterstützt auch Remote Debugging, somit lassen sich zum Beispiel .NET Core Programme, die in einem Docker-Container laufen, debuggen.

Applied Data Science with Python Certification Training Course -IgmGuru

Master Applied Data Science with Python and get noticed by the top Hiring Companies with IgmGuru's Data Science with Python Certification Program. Enroll Now

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis is a method of debugging by examining source code before a program is run. It's done by analyzing a set of code against a set (or multiple sets) of coding rules. Static code analysis and static analysis are often used interchangeably, along with source code analysis.