Coding  Fan

Coding Fan

1628841460

How to Save Pandas Data to a Django Model

In this video using a Django customer management command we move data from an Excel file to panda dataframes and save to the Django model.

Code Repository:
https://github.com/veryacademy/YT_Panda_DF_to_Django_DB 

#django 

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How to Save Pandas Data to a Django Model
Sasha  Roberts

Sasha Roberts

1659500100

Reform: Form Objects Decoupled From Models In Ruby

Reform

Form objects decoupled from your models.

Reform gives you a form object with validations and nested setup of models. It is completely framework-agnostic and doesn't care about your database.

Although reform can be used in any Ruby framework, it comes with Rails support, works with simple_form and other form gems, allows nesting forms to implement has_one and has_many relationships, can compose a form from multiple objects and gives you coercion.

Full Documentation

Reform is part of the Trailblazer framework. Full documentation is available on the project site.

Reform 2.2

Temporary note: Reform 2.2 does not automatically load Rails files anymore (e.g. ActiveModel::Validations). You need the reform-rails gem, see Installation.

Defining Forms

Forms are defined in separate classes. Often, these classes partially map to a model.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :title
  validates :title, presence: true
end

Fields are declared using ::property. Validations work exactly as you know it from Rails or other frameworks. Note that validations no longer go into the model.

The API

Forms have a ridiculously simple API with only a handful of public methods.

  1. #initialize always requires a model that the form represents.
  2. #validate(params) updates the form's fields with the input data (only the form, not the model) and then runs all validations. The return value is the boolean result of the validations.
  3. #errors returns validation messages in a classic ActiveModel style.
  4. #sync writes form data back to the model. This will only use setter methods on the model(s).
  5. #save (optional) will call #save on the model and nested models. Note that this implies a #sync call.
  6. #prepopulate! (optional) will run pre-population hooks to "fill out" your form before rendering.

In addition to the main API, forms expose accessors to the defined properties. This is used for rendering or manual operations.

Setup

In your controller or operation you create a form instance and pass in the models you want to work on.

class AlbumsController
  def new
    @form = AlbumForm.new(Album.new)
  end

This will also work as an editing form with an existing album.

def edit
  @form = AlbumForm.new(Album.find(1))
end

Reform will read property values from the model in setup. In our example, the AlbumForm will call album.title to populate the title field.

Rendering Forms

Your @form is now ready to be rendered, either do it yourself or use something like Rails' #form_for, simple_form or formtastic.

= form_for @form do |f|
  = f.input :title

Nested forms and collections can be easily rendered with fields_for, etc. Note that you no longer pass the model to the form builder, but the Reform instance.

Optionally, you might want to use the #prepopulate! method to pre-populate fields and prepare the form for rendering.

Validation

After form submission, you need to validate the input.

class SongsController
  def create
    @form = SongForm.new(Song.new)

    #=> params: {song: {title: "Rio", length: "366"}}

    if @form.validate(params[:song])

The #validate method first updates the values of the form - the underlying model is still treated as immutuable and remains unchanged. It then runs all validations you provided in the form.

It's the only entry point for updating the form. This is per design, as separating writing and validation doesn't make sense for a form.

This allows rendering the form after validate with the data that has been submitted. However, don't get confused, the model's values are still the old, original values and are only changed after a #save or #sync operation.

Syncing Back

After validation, you have two choices: either call #save and let Reform sort out the rest. Or call #sync, which will write all the properties back to the model. In a nested form, this works recursively, of course.

It's then up to you what to do with the updated models - they're still unsaved.

Saving Forms

The easiest way to save the data is to call #save on the form.

if @form.validate(params[:song])
  @form.save  #=> populates album with incoming data
              #   by calling @form.album.title=.
else
  # handle validation errors.
end

This will sync the data to the model and then call album.save.

Sometimes, you need to do saving manually.

Default values

Reform allows default values to be provided for properties.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :price_in_cents, default: 9_95
end

Saving Forms Manually

Calling #save with a block will provide a nested hash of the form's properties and values. This does not call #save on the models and allows you to implement the saving yourself.

The block parameter is a nested hash of the form input.

  @form.save do |hash|
    hash      #=> {title: "Greatest Hits"}
    Album.create(hash)
  end

You can always access the form's model. This is helpful when you were using populators to set up objects when validating.

  @form.save do |hash|
    album = @form.model

    album.update_attributes(hash[:album])
  end

Nesting

Reform provides support for nested objects. Let's say the Album model keeps some associations.

class Album < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one  :artist
  has_many :songs
end

The implementation details do not really matter here, as long as your album exposes readers and writes like Album#artist and Album#songs, this allows you to define nested forms.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  property :title
  validates :title, presence: true

  property :artist do
    property :full_name
    validates :full_name, presence: true
  end

  collection :songs do
    property :name
  end
end

You can also reuse an existing form from elsewhere using :form.

property :artist, form: ArtistForm

Nested Setup

Reform will wrap defined nested objects in their own forms. This happens automatically when instantiating the form.

album.songs #=> [<Song name:"Run To The Hills">]

form = AlbumForm.new(album)
form.songs[0] #=> <SongForm model: <Song name:"Run To The Hills">>
form.songs[0].name #=> "Run To The Hills"

Nested Rendering

When rendering a nested form you can use the form's readers to access the nested forms.

= text_field :title,         @form.title
= text_field "artist[name]", @form.artist.name

Or use something like #fields_for in a Rails environment.

= form_for @form do |f|
  = f.text_field :title

  = f.fields_for :artist do |a|
    = a.text_field :name

Nested Processing

validate will assign values to the nested forms. sync and save work analogue to the non-nested form, just in a recursive way.

The block form of #save would give you the following data.

@form.save do |nested|
  nested #=> {title:  "Greatest Hits",
         #    artist: {name: "Duran Duran"},
         #    songs: [{title: "Hungry Like The Wolf"},
         #            {title: "Last Chance On The Stairways"}]
         #   }
  end

The manual saving with block is not encouraged. You should rather check the Disposable docs to find out how to implement your manual tweak with the official API.

Populating Forms

Very often, you need to give Reform some information how to create or find nested objects when validateing. This directive is called populator and documented here.

Installation

Add this line to your Gemfile:

gem "reform"

Reform works fine with Rails 3.1-5.0. However, inheritance of validations with ActiveModel::Validations is broken in Rails 3.2 and 4.0.

Since Reform 2.2, you have to add the reform-rails gem to your Gemfile to automatically load ActiveModel/Rails files.

gem "reform-rails"

Since Reform 2.0 you need to specify which validation backend you want to use (unless you're in a Rails environment where ActiveModel will be used).

To use ActiveModel (not recommended because very out-dated).

require "reform/form/active_model/validations"
Reform::Form.class_eval do
  include Reform::Form::ActiveModel::Validations
end

To use dry-validation (recommended).

require "reform/form/dry"
Reform::Form.class_eval do
  feature Reform::Form::Dry
end

Put this in an initializer or on top of your script.

Compositions

Reform allows to map multiple models to one form. The complete documentation is here, however, this is how it works.

class AlbumForm < Reform::Form
  include Composition

  property :id,    on: :album
  property :title, on: :album
  property :songs, on: :cd
  property :cd_id, on: :cd, from: :id
end

When initializing a composition, you have to pass a hash that contains the composees.

AlbumForm.new(album: album, cd: CD.find(1))

More

Reform comes many more optional features, like hash fields, coercion, virtual fields, and so on. Check the full documentation here.

Reform is part of the Trailblazer project. Please buy my book to support the development and learn everything about Reform - there's two chapters dedicated to Reform!

Security And Strong_parameters

By explicitly defining the form layout using ::property there is no more need for protecting from unwanted input. strong_parameter or attr_accessible become obsolete. Reform will simply ignore undefined incoming parameters.

This is not Reform 1.x!

Temporary note: This is the README and API for Reform 2. On the public API, only a few tiny things have changed. Here are the Reform 1.2 docs.

Anyway, please upgrade and report problems and do not simply assume that we will magically find out what needs to get fixed. When in trouble, join us on Gitter.

Full documentation for Reform is available online, or support us and grab the Trailblazer book. There is an Upgrading Guide to help you migrate through versions.

Attributions!!!

Great thanks to Blake Education for giving us the freedom and time to develop this project in 2013 while working on their project.


Author: trailblazer
Source code: https://github.com/trailblazer/reform
License:  MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620185280

How model queries work in Django

How model queries work in Django

Welcome to my blog, hey everyone in this article we are going to be working with queries in Django so for any web app that you build your going to want to write a query so you can retrieve information from your database so in this article I’ll be showing you all the different ways that you can write queries and it should cover about 90% of the cases that you’ll have when you’re writing your code the other 10% depend on your specific use case you may have to get more complicated but for the most part what I cover in this article should be able to help you so let’s start with the model that I have I’ve already created it.

**Read More : **How to make Chatbot in Python.

Read More : Django Admin Full Customization step by step

let’s just get into this diagram that I made so in here:

django queries aboutDescribe each parameter in Django querset

we’re making a simple query for the myModel table so we want to pull out all the information in the database so we have this variable which is gonna hold a return value and we have our myModel models so this is simply the myModel model name so whatever you named your model just make sure you specify that and we’re gonna access the objects attribute once we get that object’s attribute we can simply use the all method and this will return all the information in the database so we’re gonna start with all and then we will go into getting single items filtering that data and go to our command prompt.

Here and we’ll actually start making our queries from here to do this let’s just go ahead and run** Python manage.py shell** and I am in my project file so make sure you’re in there when you start and what this does is it gives us an interactive shell to actually start working with our data so this is a lot like the Python shell but because we did manage.py it allows us to do things a Django way and actually query our database now open up the command prompt and let’s go ahead and start making our first queries.

#django #django model queries #django orm #django queries #django query #model django query #model query #query with django

 iOS App Dev

iOS App Dev

1620466520

Your Data Architecture: Simple Best Practices for Your Data Strategy

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you should probably think about your data architecture and possible best practices.

If you accumulate data on which you base your decision-making as an organization, you most probably need to think about your data architecture and consider possible best practices. Gaining a competitive edge, remaining customer-centric to the greatest extent possible, and streamlining processes to get on-the-button outcomes can all be traced back to an organization’s capacity to build a future-ready data architecture.

In what follows, we offer a short overview of the overarching capabilities of data architecture. These include user-centricity, elasticity, robustness, and the capacity to ensure the seamless flow of data at all times. Added to these are automation enablement, plus security and data governance considerations. These points from our checklist for what we perceive to be an anticipatory analytics ecosystem.

#big data #data science #big data analytics #data analysis #data architecture #data transformation #data platform #data strategy #cloud data platform #data acquisition

Ahebwe  Oscar

Ahebwe Oscar

1620177818

Django admin full Customization step by step

Welcome to my blog , hey everyone in this article you learn how to customize the Django app and view in the article you will know how to register  and unregister  models from the admin view how to add filtering how to add a custom input field, and a button that triggers an action on all objects and even how to change the look of your app and page using the Django suit package let’s get started.

Database

Custom Titles of Django Admin

Exclude in Django Admin

Fields in Django Admin

#django #create super user django #customize django admin dashboard #django admin #django admin custom field display #django admin customization #django admin full customization #django admin interface #django admin register all models #django customization

Gerhard  Brink

Gerhard Brink

1620629020

Getting Started With Data Lakes

Frameworks for Efficient Enterprise Analytics

The opportunities big data offers also come with very real challenges that many organizations are facing today. Often, it’s finding the most cost-effective, scalable way to store and process boundless volumes of data in multiple formats that come from a growing number of sources. Then organizations need the analytical capabilities and flexibility to turn this data into insights that can meet their specific business objectives.

This Refcard dives into how a data lake helps tackle these challenges at both ends — from its enhanced architecture that’s designed for efficient data ingestion, storage, and management to its advanced analytics functionality and performance flexibility. You’ll also explore key benefits and common use cases.

Introduction

As technology continues to evolve with new data sources, such as IoT sensors and social media churning out large volumes of data, there has never been a better time to discuss the possibilities and challenges of managing such data for varying analytical insights. In this Refcard, we dig deep into how data lakes solve the problem of storing and processing enormous amounts of data. While doing so, we also explore the benefits of data lakes, their use cases, and how they differ from data warehouses (DWHs).


This is a preview of the Getting Started With Data Lakes Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#big data #data analytics #data analysis #business analytics #data warehouse #data storage #data lake #data lake architecture #data lake governance #data lake management