Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1593393014

Singapore’s Contact Tracing Wearable Causes Privacy Backlash

Thousands have signed a petition that underscores data privacy issues with Singapore’s newly announced contact-tracing wearable, in development.

Singapore’s announcement that it is developing a wearable for contact tracing has caused citizens to voice concern for the technology’s impact on their data privacy, with more than 35,000 signing a petition against the devices.

On Friday during a parliament session, Vivian Balakrishnan, Minister-in-Charge of the Smart Nation Programme Office initiative and Minister for Foreign Affairs, said the wearables would help Singapore’s 5.7 million citizens track whether they were exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus.

Previously, Singapore had created a contact tracing app, TraceTogether, which uses Bluetooth mobile phones’ functions to detect other phones nearby and track the spread of the virus (which Balakrishnan said has been voluntarily downloaded by 1.5 million users). However, this app came with a slew of road bumps. Only those who had phones could participate, for instance, and even those with phones reported various interoperability issues.

The soon-to-be-rolled-out wearable devices aim to solve these glitches by allowing users to report their health conditions and then use Bluetooth to detect the conditions of others nearby — sans mobile phones. Balakrishnan said, “if this portable device works, we may then distribute it to everyone in Singapore”; however, he did not clarify whether the government would make the wearable mandatory for citizens.

Singapore residents rebuked the technology over the weekend, with a petition called “Singapore says ‘No’ to wearable devices for COVID-19 contact tracing” rejecting the development of the device.

“With a failed smartphone app already scrapped, the Singapore government is implementing a wearable, always-on contact-tracing device under the guise of tracking interactions with those afflicted by COVID-19,” Matt Gayford, principal consultant at the Crypsis Group, told Threatpost. “Officials have stated that the device will only use Bluetooth’s proximity function and will not rely on GPS or cellular data for the purposes of contact tracing. Some may find this comforting; however, others may fear it is only lip service.”

Wilson Low, who started the petition, in a Sunday post voiced concerns about the wearables potentially allowing contact tracers to locate users’ whereabouts based on their proximity to others’ phones, cell towers or potentially other wearable devices themselves.

“We reject what could potentially be a new form of apartheid (those who wear devices being unable to interact, commune or live with those who reject the devices),” said Low. “Thus, we continue to send a strident and unwavering voice to any actor or authority that the preservation of our rights and freedoms will not be predicated upon the adoption of any wearable tracking device by the general population of Singapore.”

In response to concerns aired out on his Facebook page, Balakrishnan stressed that the devices would not track user locations, but would instead use Bluetooth proximity data to collate “prolonged, close” contacts. The data would then be encrypted on users’ personal devices and erased after 25 days, he said.

In a follow-up press conference, Monday, Balakrishnan said that the wearables would not have GPS, internet or cellular connectivity — meaning that collected data can only be extracted when physically handed over to health officials.

Balakrishnan said Singapore needs to “get the balance right between public health and personal privacy.” He added that he believes Singapore is actually being far more protective of privacy than in many other jurisdictions.

“We are NOT tracking movements,” he said on his Facebook page. “There is no GPS chip. But this as a pandemic that affects all of us. And we do want to know if we have been exposed to the virus or have inadvertently exposed others if we are infected.”

While retaining the data for only 25 days is a “step in the right direction,” Gayford told Threatpost a number of questions remain about the technology, including whether anyone would be permitted to review the code and its functions, and whether people can count on government officials to allow an independent review of the software and hardware.

“In heavily regulated environments such as finance and healthcare, systems and software are required to undergo rigorous assessment and testing processes,” he said. “Many would argue governments should face the same scrutiny, especially if they expect their citizens to freely give up data that is quite literally tracking their every step.”

#mobile security #privacy #contact tracing #coronavirus #covid-19 #data privacy #singapore #tracetogether #wearable

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Singapore’s Contact Tracing Wearable Causes Privacy Backlash
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1593393014

Singapore’s Contact Tracing Wearable Causes Privacy Backlash

Thousands have signed a petition that underscores data privacy issues with Singapore’s newly announced contact-tracing wearable, in development.

Singapore’s announcement that it is developing a wearable for contact tracing has caused citizens to voice concern for the technology’s impact on their data privacy, with more than 35,000 signing a petition against the devices.

On Friday during a parliament session, Vivian Balakrishnan, Minister-in-Charge of the Smart Nation Programme Office initiative and Minister for Foreign Affairs, said the wearables would help Singapore’s 5.7 million citizens track whether they were exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus.

Previously, Singapore had created a contact tracing app, TraceTogether, which uses Bluetooth mobile phones’ functions to detect other phones nearby and track the spread of the virus (which Balakrishnan said has been voluntarily downloaded by 1.5 million users). However, this app came with a slew of road bumps. Only those who had phones could participate, for instance, and even those with phones reported various interoperability issues.

The soon-to-be-rolled-out wearable devices aim to solve these glitches by allowing users to report their health conditions and then use Bluetooth to detect the conditions of others nearby — sans mobile phones. Balakrishnan said, “if this portable device works, we may then distribute it to everyone in Singapore”; however, he did not clarify whether the government would make the wearable mandatory for citizens.

Singapore residents rebuked the technology over the weekend, with a petition called “Singapore says ‘No’ to wearable devices for COVID-19 contact tracing” rejecting the development of the device.

“With a failed smartphone app already scrapped, the Singapore government is implementing a wearable, always-on contact-tracing device under the guise of tracking interactions with those afflicted by COVID-19,” Matt Gayford, principal consultant at the Crypsis Group, told Threatpost. “Officials have stated that the device will only use Bluetooth’s proximity function and will not rely on GPS or cellular data for the purposes of contact tracing. Some may find this comforting; however, others may fear it is only lip service.”

Wilson Low, who started the petition, in a Sunday post voiced concerns about the wearables potentially allowing contact tracers to locate users’ whereabouts based on their proximity to others’ phones, cell towers or potentially other wearable devices themselves.

“We reject what could potentially be a new form of apartheid (those who wear devices being unable to interact, commune or live with those who reject the devices),” said Low. “Thus, we continue to send a strident and unwavering voice to any actor or authority that the preservation of our rights and freedoms will not be predicated upon the adoption of any wearable tracking device by the general population of Singapore.”

In response to concerns aired out on his Facebook page, Balakrishnan stressed that the devices would not track user locations, but would instead use Bluetooth proximity data to collate “prolonged, close” contacts. The data would then be encrypted on users’ personal devices and erased after 25 days, he said.

In a follow-up press conference, Monday, Balakrishnan said that the wearables would not have GPS, internet or cellular connectivity — meaning that collected data can only be extracted when physically handed over to health officials.

Balakrishnan said Singapore needs to “get the balance right between public health and personal privacy.” He added that he believes Singapore is actually being far more protective of privacy than in many other jurisdictions.

“We are NOT tracking movements,” he said on his Facebook page. “There is no GPS chip. But this as a pandemic that affects all of us. And we do want to know if we have been exposed to the virus or have inadvertently exposed others if we are infected.”

While retaining the data for only 25 days is a “step in the right direction,” Gayford told Threatpost a number of questions remain about the technology, including whether anyone would be permitted to review the code and its functions, and whether people can count on government officials to allow an independent review of the software and hardware.

“In heavily regulated environments such as finance and healthcare, systems and software are required to undergo rigorous assessment and testing processes,” he said. “Many would argue governments should face the same scrutiny, especially if they expect their citizens to freely give up data that is quite literally tracking their every step.”

#mobile security #privacy #contact tracing #coronavirus #covid-19 #data privacy #singapore #tracetogether #wearable

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595498460

Contact Tracing App: The Technology, Approach to fight COVID-19/Corona

As COVID-19 staggeringly lands blows to nations across the world, governments are considering ways to see their citizens through this pandemic. At the moment, a WHO situation report clocks the number of confirmed cases above two million along with more than one hundred thousand deaths. With vaccines dubbed as the best possible chance to tackle COVID-19 having no precise time frame of being ready, the talk is quickly shifting away to Contact Tracing Applications.

Contact tracing apps are digital solutions that use mobile technology to power the process of manual contact tracing. The apps follow a user’s movement, either by the use of Bluetooth technology, QR codes, or geo-location data while also tracking and keeping data from other user phones nearby. If one user gets diagnosed, the apps alert other users that they may have been exposed to the virus. As such, Contact Tracing Applications are being welcomed and perceived as an important approach to stem the spread of COVID-19 by providing a more accurate platform with data and information about affected individuals.

How Contact Tracing App Works

contact-tracing-app-devathon-

As mentioned above, contact tracing apps leverage mobile technology to trace cases of possible infection more accurately. But how exactly? Once installed and operative, the phone runs the app simultaneously with Bluetooth or location data to transmit signals with unique keys or IDs to phones in the designated range of connection. Similarly, the other phones with the app installed to detect and send back the signals.

For instance, if ‘Individual A’ has the app installed and goes outdoors to run some errands, they will interact with other individuals. In such a case, supposing all the other individuals had functional Contact Tracing Apps, each phone would exchange and store the contact data anonymously. It is important to note that the data collected only covers the app range distance to disregard irrelevant contacts and that their keys repeatedly change as individuals move. In any event that ‘Individual A’ tests positive for COVID-19 through confirmed tests, users who were previously within the proximity of ‘Individual A’ are alerted. Consequently, they are notified to check for symptoms, self-isolate, or get tested. Each time a person tests positive, the app notifies and advises the affected individuals.

In a nutshell, Contact Tracing Apps automate and supplement the traditional concept of tracing contacts to achieve extensive and realistic results in the least time possible.

What are the Benefits of Contact Tracing Apps?

Contract Tracing Apps are assets that offer indispensable solutions to health institutions and the public against COVID-19. There are several reasons why many governments are urging their citizens to use digital contact tracing apps to combat the spread of COVID-19. They include:

  1. The apps are more effective than manual tracing. While not perfect, their predictive algorithms frequently observe individuals detect new cases and analyze the probability one was infected. If one has contact with an asymptomatic individual, they are immediately notified and advised accordingly. Therefore, this saves time, energy, and resources that would have otherwise been overused.
  2. Contact tracing apps facilitate the relaxation of imposed restrictions or lockdowns. With a large number of infected people identified by the apps and put under surveillance, healthy citizens can be allowed to go about their duties. This may be a significant turning point to try and revive economies.
  3. Users’ private data is encrypted and secured. Even if you test positive, other users will only get notifications of possible infections. Your information is protected from both other users and developers of the app.
  4. They will increase the capacity to test and detect COVID-19 cases. With infected users alert, users who come in contact with affected persons come forward to be tested and treated with a higher recovery chance.

Future of Contact Tracing Apps?

Currently, the role of contact tracing apps is limited to accurately identifying infected individuals and their contacts as well as facilitating a quicker response to the Covid-19 threat.

Beyond that, the use of contact tracing apps is projected to take a different turn. One key area bound to change is how people’s privacy is handled. Tech institutions are under growing pressure to devise ways to develop privacy-preserving Contact Tracing Apps.

This will earn the users-trust, which is a pillar for these apps to help contain the disease. Technically, the technology will also have to improve drastically. The apps will have to seamlessly integrate with the user’s phone lifestyle causing minimal or no interference. With most applications having an open-source code, Artificial Intelligence, Beacon Technology, and Big Data solutions will be increasingly harnessed to power and improve them. The apps may also cut across various types of industries apart from health institutions.

How Can It Help to Trace COVID-19 and Reduce the Spread of the Virus?

contact-tracing-app-devathon-3

Contact Tracing Apps will effectively help stem lowering the cases of COVID-19. By using the apps, officials are able to monitor high-risk individuals easily. Also, should any new case arise, both users and health officials get notified they will swiftly act to trace, test, or isolate infected individuals.

Unlike traditional contact tracing, which may not get all contacts, these apps ensure that once Covid-19 cases are detected, they are all treated early, and those other individuals are not exposed to the infection. They also ward off users from high-risk areas. In the long run, they help break the COVID-19 chain by preventing further spread. Illustratively, an online publication by  CNBC states that more than 500,000 using a Singapore-registered mobile number downloaded the TraceTogether app within the first 24 hours of its launch. Subsequently, together with other government efforts, Singapore has since lowered the infection rate and eased restrictions.

If Contact Tracing Apps are implemented and used alongside other policies, we may as well be a few steps way to curbing this virus.

#android app #ios app #mobile app development #news #technology #contact tracing #contact tracing app #contact tracing app approach #contact tracing app technology #contact tracing coronavirus #contact tracing process #corona virus detecting app #corona virus tracing app #corona virus tracker #corona virus tracker live

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

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Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1593159660

Podcast: Would You Use A Contact-Tracing Coronavirus App?

Contact tracing apps for the coronavirus are being developed and tested globally as the world starts to re-open. Are the apps worth using to flatten the curve? Or do data privacy worries trump public health?

As a world afflicted by the coronavirus pandemic begins to re-open restaurants, retail stores and more, public-health officials remain concerned about the spread of the virus. Technology for contact-tracing apps, intended to help citizens trace whether they were exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus, have been created by countries like the U.K. and Italy, U.S. states (like Utah) and by tech giants like Apple and Google.

But behind the public-health benefits of contact tracing are privacy worriestechnology issues like interoperability, and other challenges. Threatpost discusses the benefits (and the challenges) of contact-tracing apps with Steve Moore, chief security strategist at Exabeam.

Lindsey O’Donnell Welch: Hi all, welcome back to the Threatpost podcast. You’ve got Lindsey O’Donnell Welch with Threatpost here today. And we’re going to be discussing contact-tracing apps; what they are, why they’re all over the news recently, and what kind of privacy and security issues many have that people are now talking about. So joining us today is Steve Moore, vice president and chief security strategist at Exabeam. Steve, thanks so much for joining.

Steve Moore: Yeah. Thanks for having me, Lindsey.

LO: Yeah, so, I’m sure Steve you have also been dealing with this, but coronavirus right now continues to be a topic worldwide, even as more U.S. states are opening up. And I know here in Boston, they just started opening up restaurants. But concerns are really still circulating around the virus. And the top question remains, how can we track coronavirus and really flatten the curve? And so with all that said, there’s been a ton of buzz around contact-tracing apps over the past few months. So the idea with contact tracing is to create a type of technology that helps citizens track whether they’ve been exposed to someone else who has tested positive for the virus. And you know, the tech can vary. A few places have apps being rolled out. And Singapore recently revealed that they’re developing a wearable. And then, you know, in Google and Apple’s case, there was an API that public health agencies can integrate into their own mobile apps. So Steve, let’s just start with the big question here: Would you use a contact tracing app and why or why not?

#podcasts #privacy #app #apple #contact tracing #coronavirus #data privacy #google #mobile app #podcast #public health