How to Fake Opacity With a CSS Background

I came across an interesting bit while working on the hero section of my z-index guide. I needed a way to apply an opacity for the background.

Here is the final result I want to achieve…

At the first glance, it might be tempting to say that it’s easy. However, it’s a bit more detailed. Let’s dig into the details of it.

The Layers

  • Solid background
  • Pattern image
  • Oval blurred shape: to make it easier to read the text content.

For me, 3D is a good way to imagine how to stack the layers. I also made a video to make it more clear.

If you’re not into 3D, it’s totally fine. Here is a normal view of all the layers.

The Requirements

  • I need a dynamic way to fake an opacity for the pattern image.
  • I shouldn’t use an additional HTML element for this job.
  • It should be responsive.

To implement that, we can use multiple CSS gradients. Here is how I did it:

:root {
  --oval-w: 50%;
  --oval-h: 70%;
  --base-color: rgba(194, 236, 231, 0.8);
  --pattern: url("hero-bg.svg");
}

.hero {
  min-height: 400px;
  background: linear-gradient(var(--base-color), var(--base-color)),
    radial-gradient(#c2ece7 25%, transparent) center/50% 90% no-repeat, var(
        --pattern
      ) center/cover no-repeat;
}

Code Explanation

  • What comes later in the gradient is displayed the last (The opposite of the stacking order).
  • In CSS gradients, using the same value for a linear gradient will result in a solid color. I like using this method. The solid color with rgba() will fake the opacity for us.
  • The oval shape is created with a radial gradient.
  • I used percentages for the oval shape, so it can resize based on the screen size.

With that, I used the pattern image as it is without altering its opacity manually. I can change the background color the way I want without using a design program in case I changed the pattern.

#snippet #css background #css #background

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

How to Fake Opacity With a CSS Background

How to Fake Opacity With a CSS Background

I came across an interesting bit while working on the hero section of my z-index guide. I needed a way to apply an opacity for the background.

Here is the final result I want to achieve…

At the first glance, it might be tempting to say that it’s easy. However, it’s a bit more detailed. Let’s dig into the details of it.

The Layers

  • Solid background
  • Pattern image
  • Oval blurred shape: to make it easier to read the text content.

For me, 3D is a good way to imagine how to stack the layers. I also made a video to make it more clear.

If you’re not into 3D, it’s totally fine. Here is a normal view of all the layers.

The Requirements

  • I need a dynamic way to fake an opacity for the pattern image.
  • I shouldn’t use an additional HTML element for this job.
  • It should be responsive.

To implement that, we can use multiple CSS gradients. Here is how I did it:

:root {
  --oval-w: 50%;
  --oval-h: 70%;
  --base-color: rgba(194, 236, 231, 0.8);
  --pattern: url("hero-bg.svg");
}

.hero {
  min-height: 400px;
  background: linear-gradient(var(--base-color), var(--base-color)),
    radial-gradient(#c2ece7 25%, transparent) center/50% 90% no-repeat, var(
        --pattern
      ) center/cover no-repeat;
}

Code Explanation

  • What comes later in the gradient is displayed the last (The opposite of the stacking order).
  • In CSS gradients, using the same value for a linear gradient will result in a solid color. I like using this method. The solid color with rgba() will fake the opacity for us.
  • The oval shape is created with a radial gradient.
  • I used percentages for the oval shape, so it can resize based on the screen size.

With that, I used the pattern image as it is without altering its opacity manually. I can change the background color the way I want without using a design program in case I changed the pattern.

#snippet #css background #css #background

CSS Animation: translate3d, backdrop-filter, and Custom Tags

In this tutorial, we are going to learn:

  • how to create a smooth animation using the CSS transform translate3d prop.
  • why we’d want to use the cubic-bezier transition timing function and this function’s benefits.
  • how and why we use custom tags.
  • if you watch the video to the end, I also provide a bonus tip on using backdrop-filter to style some frost/blur style on background.

#css #css animation #css / style sheets #css animations #css background

Hire CSS Developer

Want to develop a website or re-design using CSS Development?

We build a website and we implemented CSS successfully if you are planning to Hire CSS Developer from HourlyDeveloper.io, We can fill your Page with creative colors and attractive Designs. We provide services in Web Designing, Website Redesigning and etc.

For more details…!!
Consult with our experts:- https://bit.ly/3hUdppS

#hire css developer #css development company #css development services #css development #css developer #css

Alayna  Rippin

Alayna Rippin

1603188000

Creating a CSS Visual Cheatsheet

The other day one of our students asked about possibility of having a CSS cheatsheet to help to decide on the best suited approach when doing this or that layout.

This evolved into the idea of making a visual CSS cheatsheet with all (most) of the common patterns we see everyday and one of the best possible conceptual implementation for them.

In the end any layout could and should be split into parts/blocks and we see every block separately.

Here is our first take on that and we would be happy to keep extending it to help us all.

Please, send you suggestions in the comments in community or via gitlab for the repeated CSS patterns with your favourite implementation for that so that we will all together make this as useful as it can be.

#css #css3 #cascading-style-sheets #web-development #html-css #css-grids #learning-css #html-css-basics

Aisu  Joesph

Aisu Joesph

1618024175

CSS Alignment Made Simple

CSS is seen as an impediment in web development for many of us. Most of the time it looks like even when you follow the rules and everything seems clear, it still doesn’t work the way you want it to.

Therefore, the purpose of this article is to make some features of CSS much easier to understand.

The thing I want to address now is the alignment of the elements.

Without further ado, here are some of the most common scenarios one might encounter when it comes to this topic and how they can be approached.

#css-center #css-position #css-flexbox #css-center-image-in-a-div #css