Python  Library

Python Library

1656431160

Qutebrowser: A Keyboard-driven, Vim-like Browser Based on PyQt5

qutebrowser is a keyboard-focused browser with a minimal GUI. It’s based on Python and Qt and free software, licensed under the GPL.

It was inspired by other browsers/addons like dwb and Vimperator/Pentadactyl.

qutebrowser’s primary maintainer, The-Compiler, is currently working part-time on qutebrowser, funded by donations. To sustain this for a long time, your help is needed! See the GitHub Sponsors page for more information. Depending on your sign-up date and how long you keep a certain level, you can get qutebrowser t-shirts, stickers and more!

Screenshots

screenshot 1 screenshot 2 screenshot 3 screenshot 4

Downloads

See the github releases page for available downloads and the INSTALL file for detailed instructions on how to get qutebrowser running on various platforms.

Documentation and getting help

Please see the help page for available documentation pages and support channels.

Contributions / Bugs

You want to contribute to qutebrowser? Awesome! Please read the contribution guidelines for details and useful hints.

If you found a bug or have a feature request, you can report it in several ways:

For security bugs, please contact me directly at mail@qutebrowser.org, GPG ID 0x916eb0c8fd55a072.

Requirements

The following software and libraries are required to run qutebrowser:

  • Python 3.7 or newer
  • Qt 5.12.0 or newer (5.12 LTS or 5.15 recommended, Qt 6 is not supported yet) with the following modules:
    • QtCore / qtbase
    • QtQuick (part of qtbase or qtdeclarative in some distributions)
    • QtSQL (part of qtbase in some distributions)
    • QtDBus (part of qtbase in some distributions; note that a connection to DBus at runtime is optional)
    • QtOpenGL
    • QtWebEngine, or
    • alternatively QtWebKit (5.212) - This is not recommended due to known security issues in QtWebKit, you most likely want to use qutebrowser with the default QtWebEngine backend (based on Chromium) instead. Quoting the QtWebKit releases page: [The latest QtWebKit] release is based on [an] old WebKit revision with known unpatched vulnerabilities. Please use it carefully and avoid visiting untrusted websites and using it for transmission of sensitive data.
  • PyQt 5.12.0 or newer for Python 3
  • jinja2
  • PyYAML

On older Python versions (3.7/3.8), the following backports are also required:

The following libraries are optional:

  • adblock (for improved adblocking using ABP syntax)
  • pygments for syntax highlighting with :view-source on QtWebKit, or when using :view-source --pygments with the (default) QtWebEngine backend.
  • On Windows, colorama for colored log output.
  • importlib_metadata on Python 3.7, to improve QtWebEngine version detection when PyQtWebEngine is installed via pip (thus, this dependency usually isn’t relevant for packagers).
  • asciidoc to generate the documentation for the :help command, when using the git repository (rather than a release).

See the documentation for directions on how to install qutebrowser and its dependencies.

Similar projects

Various projects with a similar goal like qutebrowser exist. Many of them were inspirations for qutebrowser in some way, thanks for that!

Active

Inactive

Download Details:
Author: qutebrowser
Source Code: https://github.com/qutebrowser/qutebrowser
License: GPL-3.0 license

#python 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Qutebrowser: A Keyboard-driven, Vim-like Browser Based on PyQt5
Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595494844

How to start an electric scooter facility/fleet in a university campus/IT park

Are you leading an organization that has a large campus, e.g., a large university? You are probably thinking of introducing an electric scooter/bicycle fleet on the campus, and why wouldn’t you?

Introducing micro-mobility in your campus with the help of such a fleet would help the people on the campus significantly. People would save money since they don’t need to use a car for a short distance. Your campus will see a drastic reduction in congestion, moreover, its carbon footprint will reduce.

Micro-mobility is relatively new though and you would need help. You would need to select an appropriate fleet of vehicles. The people on your campus would need to find electric scooters or electric bikes for commuting, and you need to provide a solution for this.

To be more specific, you need a short-term electric bike rental app. With such an app, you will be able to easily offer micro-mobility to the people on the campus. We at Devathon have built Autorent exactly for this.

What does Autorent do and how can it help you? How does it enable you to introduce micro-mobility on your campus? We explain these in this article, however, we will touch upon a few basics first.

Micro-mobility: What it is

micro-mobility

You are probably thinking about micro-mobility relatively recently, aren’t you? A few relevant insights about it could help you to better appreciate its importance.

Micro-mobility is a new trend in transportation, and it uses vehicles that are considerably smaller than cars. Electric scooters (e-scooters) and electric bikes (e-bikes) are the most popular forms of micro-mobility, however, there are also e-unicycles and e-skateboards.

You might have already seen e-scooters, which are kick scooters that come with a motor. Thanks to its motor, an e-scooter can achieve a speed of up to 20 km/h. On the other hand, e-bikes are popular in China and Japan, and they come with a motor, and you can reach a speed of 40 km/h.

You obviously can’t use these vehicles for very long commutes, however, what if you need to travel a short distance? Even if you have a reasonable public transport facility in the city, it might not cover the route you need to take. Take the example of a large university campus. Such a campus is often at a considerable distance from the central business district of the city where it’s located. While public transport facilities may serve the central business district, they wouldn’t serve this large campus. Currently, many people drive their cars even for short distances.

As you know, that brings its own set of challenges. Vehicular traffic adds significantly to pollution, moreover, finding a parking spot can be hard in crowded urban districts.

Well, you can reduce your carbon footprint if you use an electric car. However, electric cars are still new, and many countries are still building the necessary infrastructure for them. Your large campus might not have the necessary infrastructure for them either. Presently, electric cars don’t represent a viable option in most geographies.

As a result, you need to buy and maintain a car even if your commute is short. In addition to dealing with parking problems, you need to spend significantly on your car.

All of these factors have combined to make people sit up and think seriously about cars. Many people are now seriously considering whether a car is really the best option even if they have to commute only a short distance.

This is where micro-mobility enters the picture. When you commute a short distance regularly, e-scooters or e-bikes are viable options. You limit your carbon footprints and you cut costs!

Businesses have seen this shift in thinking, and e-scooter companies like Lime and Bird have entered this field in a big way. They let you rent e-scooters by the minute. On the other hand, start-ups like Jump and Lyft have entered the e-bike market.

Think of your campus now! The people there might need to travel short distances within the campus, and e-scooters can really help them.

How micro-mobility can benefit you

benefits-micromobility

What advantages can you get from micro-mobility? Let’s take a deeper look into this question.

Micro-mobility can offer several advantages to the people on your campus, e.g.:

  • Affordability: Shared e-scooters are cheaper than other mass transportation options. Remember that the people on your campus will use them on a shared basis, and they will pay for their short commutes only. Well, depending on your operating model, you might even let them use shared e-scooters or e-bikes for free!
  • Convenience: Users don’t need to worry about finding parking spots for shared e-scooters since these are small. They can easily travel from point A to point B on your campus with the help of these e-scooters.
  • Environmentally sustainable: Shared e-scooters reduce the carbon footprint, moreover, they decongest the roads. Statistics from the pilot programs in cities like Portland and Denver showimpressive gains around this key aspect.
  • Safety: This one’s obvious, isn’t it? When people on your campus use small e-scooters or e-bikes instead of cars, the problem of overspeeding will disappear. you will see fewer accidents.

#android app #autorent #ios app #mobile app development #app like bird #app like bounce #app like lime #autorent #bird scooter business model #bird scooter rental #bird scooter rental cost #bird scooter rental price #clone app like bird #clone app like bounce #clone app like lime #electric rental scooters #electric scooter company #electric scooter rental business #how do you start a moped #how to start a moped #how to start a scooter rental business #how to start an electric company #how to start electric scooterrental business #lime scooter business model #scooter franchise #scooter rental business #scooter rental business for sale #scooter rental business insurance #scooters franchise cost #white label app like bird #white label app like bounce #white label app like lime

Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1595491178

Best Electric Bikes and Scooters for Rental Business or Campus Facility

The electric scooter revolution has caught on super-fast taking many cities across the globe by storm. eScooters, a renovated version of old-school scooters now turned into electric vehicles are an environmentally friendly solution to current on-demand commute problems. They work on engines, like cars, enabling short traveling distances without hassle. The result is that these groundbreaking electric machines can now provide faster transport for less — cheaper than Uber and faster than Metro.

Since they are durable, fast, easy to operate and maintain, and are more convenient to park compared to four-wheelers, the eScooters trend has and continues to spike interest as a promising growth area. Several companies and universities are increasingly setting up shop to provide eScooter services realizing a would-be profitable business model and a ready customer base that is university students or residents in need of faster and cheap travel going about their business in school, town, and other surrounding areas.

Electric Scooters Trends and Statistics

In many countries including the U.S., Canada, Mexico, U.K., Germany, France, China, Japan, India, Brazil and Mexico and more, a growing number of eScooter users both locals and tourists can now be seen effortlessly passing lines of drivers stuck in the endless and unmoving traffic.

A recent report by McKinsey revealed that the E-Scooter industry will be worth― $200 billion to $300 billion in the United States, $100 billion to $150 billion in Europe, and $30 billion to $50 billion in China in 2030. The e-Scooter revenue model will also spike and is projected to rise by more than 20% amounting to approximately $5 billion.

And, with a necessity to move people away from high carbon prints, traffic and congestion issues brought about by car-centric transport systems in cities, more and more city planners are developing more bike/scooter lanes and adopting zero-emission plans. This is the force behind the booming electric scooter market and the numbers will only go higher and higher.

Companies that have taken advantage of the growing eScooter trend develop an appthat allows them to provide efficient eScooter services. Such an app enables them to be able to locate bike pick-up and drop points through fully integrated google maps.

List of Best Electric Bikes for Rental Business or Campus Facility 2020:

It’s clear that e scooters will increasingly become more common and the e-scooter business model will continue to grab the attention of manufacturers, investors, entrepreneurs. All this should go ahead with a quest to know what are some of the best electric bikes in the market especially for anyone who would want to get started in the electric bikes/scooters rental business.

We have done a comprehensive list of the best electric bikes! Each bike has been reviewed in depth and includes a full list of specs and a photo.

Billy eBike

mobile-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enkicycles/billy-were-redefining-joyrides

To start us off is the Billy eBike, a powerful go-anywhere urban electric bike that’s specially designed to offer an exciting ride like no other whether you want to ride to the grocery store, cafe, work or school. The Billy eBike comes in 4 color options – Billy Blue, Polished aluminium, Artic white, and Stealth black.

Price: $2490

Available countries

Available in the USA, Europe, Asia, South Africa and Australia.This item ships from the USA. Buyers are therefore responsible for any taxes and/or customs duties incurred once it arrives in your country.

Features

  • Control – Ride with confidence with our ultra-wide BMX bars and a hyper-responsive twist throttle.
  • Stealth- Ride like a ninja with our Gates carbon drive that’s as smooth as butter and maintenance-free.
  • Drive – Ride further with our high torque fat bike motor, giving a better climbing performance.
  • Accelerate – Ride quicker with our 20-inch lightweight cutout rims for improved acceleration.
  • Customize – Ride your own way with 5 levels of power control. Each level determines power and speed.
  • Flickable – Ride harder with our BMX /MotoX inspired geometry and lightweight aluminum package

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 20 mph (32 km/h)
  • Range per charge: 41 miles (66 km)
  • Maximum Power: 500W
  • Motor type: Fat Bike Motor: Bafang RM G060.500.DC
  • Load capacity: 300lbs (136kg)
  • Battery type: 13.6Ah Samsung lithium-ion,
  • Battery capacity: On/off-bike charging available
  • Weight: w/o batt. 48.5lbs (22kg), w/ batt. 54lbs (24.5kg)
  • Front Suspension: Fully adjustable air shock, preload/compression damping /lockout
  • Rear Suspension: spring, preload adjustment
  • Built-in GPS

Why Should You Buy This?

  • Riding fun and excitement
  • Better climbing ability and faster acceleration.
  • Ride with confidence
  • Billy folds for convenient storage and transportation.
  • Shorty levers connect to disc brakes ensuring you stop on a dime
  • belt drives are maintenance-free and clean (no oil or lubrication needed)

**Who Should Ride Billy? **

Both new and experienced riders

**Where to Buy? **Local distributors or ships from the USA.

Genze 200 series e-Bike

genze-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://www.genze.com/fleet/

Featuring a sleek and lightweight aluminum frame design, the 200-Series ebike takes your riding experience to greater heights. Available in both black and white this ebike comes with a connected app, which allows you to plan activities, map distances and routes while also allowing connections with fellow riders.

Price: $2099.00

Available countries

The Genze 200 series e-Bike is available at GenZe retail locations across the U.S or online via GenZe.com website. Customers from outside the US can ship the product while incurring the relevant charges.

Features

  • 2 Frame Options
  • 2 Sizes
  • Integrated/Removable Battery
  • Throttle and Pedal Assist Ride Modes
  • Integrated LCD Display
  • Connected App
  • 24 month warranty
  • GPS navigation
  • Bluetooth connectivity

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 20 mph with throttle
  • Range per charge: 15-18 miles w/ throttle and 30-50 miles w/ pedal assist
  • Charging time: 3.5 hours
  • Motor type: Brushless Rear Hub Motor
  • Gears: Microshift Thumb Shifter
  • Battery type: Removable Samsung 36V, 9.6AH Li-Ion battery pack
  • Battery capacity: 36V and 350 Wh
  • Weight: 46 pounds
  • Derailleur: 8-speed Shimano
  • Brakes: Dual classic
  • Wheels: 26 x 20 inches
  • Frame: 16, and 18 inches
  • Operating Mode: Analog mode 5 levels of Pedal Assist Thrott­le Mode

Norco from eBikestore

norco-best-electric-bikes-scooters https://ebikestore.com/shop/norco-vlt-s2/

The Norco VLT S2 is a front suspension e-Bike with solid components alongside the reliable Bosch Performance Line Power systems that offer precise pedal assistance during any riding situation.

Price: $2,699.00

Available countries

This item is available via the various Norco bikes international distributors.

Features

  • VLT aluminum frame- for stiffness and wheel security.
  • Bosch e-bike system – for their reliability and performance.
  • E-bike components – for added durability.
  • Hydraulic disc brakes – offer riders more stopping power for safety and control at higher speeds.
  • Practical design features – to add convenience and versatility.

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: KMC X9 9spd
  • Motor type: Bosch Active Line
  • Gears: Shimano Altus RD-M2000, SGS, 9 Speed
  • Battery type: Power Pack 400
  • Battery capacity: 396Wh
  • Suspension: SR Suntour suspension fork
  • Frame: Norco VLT, Aluminum, 12x142mm TA Dropouts

Bodo EV

bodo-best-electric-bikes-scootershttp://www.bodoevs.com/bodoev/products_show.asp?product_id=13

Manufactured by Bodo Vehicle Group Limited, the Bodo EV is specially designed for strong power and extraordinary long service to facilitate super amazing rides. The Bodo Vehicle Company is a striking top in electric vehicles brand field in China and across the globe. Their Bodo EV will no doubt provide your riders with high-level riding satisfaction owing to its high-quality design, strength, breaking stability and speed.

Price: $799

Available countries

This item ships from China with buyers bearing the shipping costs and other variables prior to delivery.

Features

  • Reliable
  • Environment friendly
  • Comfortable riding
  • Fashionable
  • Economical
  • Durable – long service life
  • Braking stability
  • LED lighting technology

Specifications

  • Maximum speed: 45km/h
  • Range per charge: 50km per person
  • Charging time: 8 hours
  • Maximum Power: 3000W
  • Motor type: Brushless DC Motor
  • Load capacity: 100kg
  • Battery type: Lead-acid battery
  • Battery capacity: 60V 20AH
  • Weight: w/o battery 47kg

#android app #autorent #entrepreneurship #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #news #app like bird #app like bounce #app like lime #autorent #best electric bikes 2020 #best electric bikes for rental business #best electric kick scooters 2020 #best electric kickscooters for rental business #best electric scooters 2020 #best electric scooters for rental business #bird scooter business model #bird scooter rental #bird scooter rental cost #bird scooter rental price #clone app like bird #clone app like bounce #clone app like lime #electric rental scooters #electric scooter company #electric scooter rental business #how do you start a moped #how to start a moped #how to start a scooter rental business #how to start an electric company #how to start electric scooterrental business #lime scooter business model #scooter franchise #scooter rental business #scooter rental business for sale #scooter rental business insurance #scooters franchise cost #white label app like bird #white label app like bounce #white label app like lime

Python  Library

Python Library

1656431160

Qutebrowser: A Keyboard-driven, Vim-like Browser Based on PyQt5

qutebrowser is a keyboard-focused browser with a minimal GUI. It’s based on Python and Qt and free software, licensed under the GPL.

It was inspired by other browsers/addons like dwb and Vimperator/Pentadactyl.

qutebrowser’s primary maintainer, The-Compiler, is currently working part-time on qutebrowser, funded by donations. To sustain this for a long time, your help is needed! See the GitHub Sponsors page for more information. Depending on your sign-up date and how long you keep a certain level, you can get qutebrowser t-shirts, stickers and more!

Screenshots

screenshot 1 screenshot 2 screenshot 3 screenshot 4

Downloads

See the github releases page for available downloads and the INSTALL file for detailed instructions on how to get qutebrowser running on various platforms.

Documentation and getting help

Please see the help page for available documentation pages and support channels.

Contributions / Bugs

You want to contribute to qutebrowser? Awesome! Please read the contribution guidelines for details and useful hints.

If you found a bug or have a feature request, you can report it in several ways:

For security bugs, please contact me directly at mail@qutebrowser.org, GPG ID 0x916eb0c8fd55a072.

Requirements

The following software and libraries are required to run qutebrowser:

  • Python 3.7 or newer
  • Qt 5.12.0 or newer (5.12 LTS or 5.15 recommended, Qt 6 is not supported yet) with the following modules:
    • QtCore / qtbase
    • QtQuick (part of qtbase or qtdeclarative in some distributions)
    • QtSQL (part of qtbase in some distributions)
    • QtDBus (part of qtbase in some distributions; note that a connection to DBus at runtime is optional)
    • QtOpenGL
    • QtWebEngine, or
    • alternatively QtWebKit (5.212) - This is not recommended due to known security issues in QtWebKit, you most likely want to use qutebrowser with the default QtWebEngine backend (based on Chromium) instead. Quoting the QtWebKit releases page: [The latest QtWebKit] release is based on [an] old WebKit revision with known unpatched vulnerabilities. Please use it carefully and avoid visiting untrusted websites and using it for transmission of sensitive data.
  • PyQt 5.12.0 or newer for Python 3
  • jinja2
  • PyYAML

On older Python versions (3.7/3.8), the following backports are also required:

The following libraries are optional:

  • adblock (for improved adblocking using ABP syntax)
  • pygments for syntax highlighting with :view-source on QtWebKit, or when using :view-source --pygments with the (default) QtWebEngine backend.
  • On Windows, colorama for colored log output.
  • importlib_metadata on Python 3.7, to improve QtWebEngine version detection when PyQtWebEngine is installed via pip (thus, this dependency usually isn’t relevant for packagers).
  • asciidoc to generate the documentation for the :help command, when using the git repository (rather than a release).

See the documentation for directions on how to install qutebrowser and its dependencies.

Similar projects

Various projects with a similar goal like qutebrowser exist. Many of them were inspirations for qutebrowser in some way, thanks for that!

Active

Inactive

Download Details:
Author: qutebrowser
Source Code: https://github.com/qutebrowser/qutebrowser
License: GPL-3.0 license

#python 

Keyboard: Take Full Control Of Keyboard With This Small Python Library

Hook and simulate global keyboard events on Windows and Linux.

Take full control of your keyboard with this small Python library. Hook global events, register hotkeys, simulate key presses and much more.

Features

  • Global event hook on all keyboards (captures keys regardless of focus).
  • Listen and send keyboard events.
  • Works with Windows and Linux (requires sudo), with experimental OS X support (thanks @glitchassassin!).
  • Pure Python, no C modules to be compiled.
  • Zero dependencies. Trivial to install and deploy, just copy the files.
  • Python 2 and 3.
  • Complex hotkey support (e.g. ctrl+shift+m, ctrl+space) with controllable timeout.
  • Includes high level API (e.g. record and play, add_abbreviation).
  • Maps keys as they actually are in your layout, with full internationalization support (e.g. Ctrl+ç).
  • Events automatically captured in separate thread, doesn't block main program.
  • Tested and documented.
  • Doesn't break accented dead keys (I'm looking at you, pyHook).
  • Mouse support available via project mouse (pip install mouse).

Usage

Install the PyPI package:

pip install keyboard

or clone the repository (no installation required, source files are sufficient):

git clone https://github.com/boppreh/keyboard

or download and extract the zip into your project folder.

Then check the API docs below to see what features are available.

Example

Use as library:

import keyboard

keyboard.press_and_release('shift+s, space')

keyboard.write('The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.')

keyboard.add_hotkey('ctrl+shift+a', print, args=('triggered', 'hotkey'))

# Press PAGE UP then PAGE DOWN to type "foobar".
keyboard.add_hotkey('page up, page down', lambda: keyboard.write('foobar'))

# Blocks until you press esc.
keyboard.wait('esc')

# Record events until 'esc' is pressed.
recorded = keyboard.record(until='esc')
# Then replay back at three times the speed.
keyboard.play(recorded, speed_factor=3)

# Type @@ then press space to replace with abbreviation.
keyboard.add_abbreviation('@@', 'my.long.email@example.com')

# Block forever, like `while True`.
keyboard.wait()

Use as standalone module:

# Save JSON events to a file until interrupted:
python -m keyboard > events.txt

cat events.txt
# {"event_type": "down", "scan_code": 25, "name": "p", "time": 1622447562.2994788, "is_keypad": false}
# {"event_type": "up", "scan_code": 25, "name": "p", "time": 1622447562.431007, "is_keypad": false}
# ...

# Replay events
python -m keyboard < events.txt

Known limitations:

  • Events generated under Windows don't report device id (event.device == None). #21
  • Media keys on Linux may appear nameless (scan-code only) or not at all. #20
  • Key suppression/blocking only available on Windows. #22
  • To avoid depending on X, the Linux parts reads raw device files (/dev/input/input*) but this requires root.
  • Other applications, such as some games, may register hooks that swallow all key events. In this case keyboard will be unable to report events.
  • This program makes no attempt to hide itself, so don't use it for keyloggers or online gaming bots. Be responsible.
  • SSH connections forward only the text typed, not keyboard events. Therefore if you connect to a server or Raspberry PI that is running keyboard via SSH, the server will not detect your key events.

Common patterns and mistakes

Preventing the program from closing

import keyboard
keyboard.add_hotkey('space', lambda: print('space was pressed!'))
# If the program finishes, the hotkey is not in effect anymore.

# Don't do this! This will use 100% of your CPU.
#while True: pass

# Use this instead
keyboard.wait()

# or this
import time
while True:
    time.sleep(1000000)

Waiting for a key press one time

import keyboard

# Don't do this! This will use 100% of your CPU until you press the key.
#
#while not keyboard.is_pressed('space'):
#    continue
#print('space was pressed, continuing...')

# Do this instead
keyboard.wait('space')
print('space was pressed, continuing...')

Repeatedly waiting for a key press

import keyboard

# Don't do this!
#
#while True:
#    if keyboard.is_pressed('space'):
#        print('space was pressed!')
#
# This will use 100% of your CPU and print the message many times.

# Do this instead
while True:
    keyboard.wait('space')
    print('space was pressed! Waiting on it again...')

# or this
keyboard.add_hotkey('space', lambda: print('space was pressed!'))
keyboard.wait()

Invoking code when an event happens

import keyboard

# Don't do this! This will call `print('space')` immediately then fail when the key is actually pressed.
#keyboard.add_hotkey('space', print('space was pressed'))

# Do this instead
keyboard.add_hotkey('space', lambda: print('space was pressed'))

# or this
def on_space():
    print('space was pressed')
keyboard.add_hotkey('space', on_space)

# or this
while True:
    # Wait for the next event.
    event = keyboard.read_event()
    if event.event_type == keyboard.KEY_DOWN and event.name == 'space':
        print('space was pressed')

'Press any key to continue'

# Don't do this! The `keyboard` module is meant for global events, even when your program is not in focus.
#import keyboard
#print('Press any key to continue...')
#keyboard.get_event()

# Do this instead
input('Press enter to continue...')

# Or one of the suggestions from here
# https://stackoverflow.com/questions/983354/how-to-make-a-script-wait-for-a-pressed-key

API

Table of Contents

keyboard.KEY_DOWN

= 'down'

keyboard.KEY_UP

= 'up'

class keyboard.KeyboardEvent

KeyboardEvent.device

KeyboardEvent.event_type

KeyboardEvent.is_keypad

KeyboardEvent.modifiers

KeyboardEvent.name

KeyboardEvent.scan_code

KeyboardEvent.time

KeyboardEvent.to_json(self, ensure_ascii=False)

[source]

keyboard.all_modifiers

= {'alt', 'alt gr', 'ctrl', 'left alt', 'left ctrl', 'left shift', 'left windows', 'right alt', 'right ctrl', 'right shift', 'right windows', 'shift', 'windows'}

keyboard.sided_modifiers

= {'alt', 'ctrl', 'shift', 'windows'}

keyboard.version

= '0.13.5'

keyboard.is_modifier(key)

[source]

Returns True if key is a scan code or name of a modifier key.

keyboard.key_to_scan_codes(key, error_if_missing=True)

[source]

Returns a list of scan codes associated with this key (name or scan code).

keyboard.parse_hotkey(hotkey)

[source]

Parses a user-provided hotkey into nested tuples representing the parsed structure, with the bottom values being lists of scan codes. Also accepts raw scan codes, which are then wrapped in the required number of nestings.

Example:


parse_hotkey("alt+shift+a, alt+b, c")
#    Keys:    ^~^ ^~~~^ ^  ^~^ ^  ^
#    Steps:   ^~~~~~~~~~^  ^~~~^  ^

# ((alt_codes, shift_codes, a_codes), (alt_codes, b_codes), (c_codes,))

keyboard.send(hotkey, do_press=True, do_release=True)

[source]

Sends OS events that perform the given hotkey hotkey.

  • hotkey can be either a scan code (e.g. 57 for space), single key (e.g. 'space') or multi-key, multi-step hotkey (e.g. 'alt+F4, enter').
  • do_press if true then press events are sent. Defaults to True.
  • do_release if true then release events are sent. Defaults to True.

send(57)
send('ctrl+alt+del')
send('alt+F4, enter')
send('shift+s')

Note: keys are released in the opposite order they were pressed.

keyboard.press(hotkey)

[source]

Presses and holds down a hotkey (see send).

keyboard.release(hotkey)

[source]

Releases a hotkey (see send).

keyboard.is_pressed(hotkey)

[source]

Returns True if the key is pressed.


is_pressed(57) #-> True
is_pressed('space') #-> True
is_pressed('ctrl+space') #-> True

keyboard.call_later(fn, args=(), delay=0.001)

[source]

Calls the provided function in a new thread after waiting some time. Useful for giving the system some time to process an event, without blocking the current execution flow.

keyboard.hook(callback, suppress=False, on_remove=<lambda>)

[source]

Installs a global listener on all available keyboards, invoking callback each time a key is pressed or released.

The event passed to the callback is of type keyboard.KeyboardEvent, with the following attributes:

  • name: an Unicode representation of the character (e.g. "&") or description (e.g. "space"). The name is always lower-case.
  • scan_code: number representing the physical key, e.g. 55.
  • time: timestamp of the time the event occurred, with as much precision as given by the OS.

Returns the given callback for easier development.

keyboard.on_press(callback, suppress=False)

[source]

Invokes callback for every KEY_DOWN event. For details see hook.

keyboard.on_release(callback, suppress=False)

[source]

Invokes callback for every KEY_UP event. For details see hook.

keyboard.hook_key(key, callback, suppress=False)

[source]

Hooks key up and key down events for a single key. Returns the event handler created. To remove a hooked key use unhook_key(key) or unhook_key(handler).

Note: this function shares state with hotkeys, so clear_all_hotkeys affects it as well.

keyboard.on_press_key(key, callback, suppress=False)

[source]

Invokes callback for KEY_DOWN event related to the given key. For details see hook.

keyboard.on_release_key(key, callback, suppress=False)

[source]

Invokes callback for KEY_UP event related to the given key. For details see hook.

keyboard.unhook(remove)

[source]

Removes a previously added hook, either by callback or by the return value of hook.

keyboard.unhook_all()

[source]

Removes all keyboard hooks in use, including hotkeys, abbreviations, word listeners, recorders and waits.

keyboard.block_key(key)

[source]

Suppresses all key events of the given key, regardless of modifiers.

keyboard.remap_key(src, dst)

[source]

Whenever the key src is pressed or released, regardless of modifiers, press or release the hotkey dst instead.

keyboard.parse_hotkey_combinations(hotkey)

[source]

Parses a user-provided hotkey. Differently from parse_hotkey, instead of each step being a list of the different scan codes for each key, each step is a list of all possible combinations of those scan codes.

keyboard.add_hotkey(hotkey, callback, args=(), suppress=False, timeout=1, trigger_on_release=False)

[source]

Invokes a callback every time a hotkey is pressed. The hotkey must be in the format ctrl+shift+a, s. This would trigger when the user holds ctrl, shift and "a" at once, releases, and then presses "s". To represent literal commas, pluses, and spaces, use their names ('comma', 'plus', 'space').

  • args is an optional list of arguments to passed to the callback during each invocation.
  • suppress defines if successful triggers should block the keys from being sent to other programs.
  • timeout is the amount of seconds allowed to pass between key presses.
  • trigger_on_release if true, the callback is invoked on key release instead of key press.

The event handler function is returned. To remove a hotkey call remove_hotkey(hotkey) or remove_hotkey(handler). before the hotkey state is reset.

Note: hotkeys are activated when the last key is pressed, not released. Note: the callback is executed in a separate thread, asynchronously. For an example of how to use a callback synchronously, see wait.

Examples:


# Different but equivalent ways to listen for a spacebar key press.
add_hotkey(' ', print, args=['space was pressed'])
add_hotkey('space', print, args=['space was pressed'])
add_hotkey('Space', print, args=['space was pressed'])
# Here 57 represents the keyboard code for spacebar; so you will be
# pressing 'spacebar', not '57' to activate the print function.
add_hotkey(57, print, args=['space was pressed'])

add_hotkey('ctrl+q', quit)
add_hotkey('ctrl+alt+enter, space', some_callback)

keyboard.remove_hotkey(hotkey_or_callback)

[source]

Removes a previously hooked hotkey. Must be called with the value returned by add_hotkey.

keyboard.unhook_all_hotkeys()

[source]

Removes all keyboard hotkeys in use, including abbreviations, word listeners, recorders and waits.

keyboard.remap_hotkey(src, dst, suppress=True, trigger_on_release=False)

[source]

Whenever the hotkey src is pressed, suppress it and send dst instead.

Example:


remap('alt+w', 'ctrl+up')

keyboard.stash_state()

[source]

Builds a list of all currently pressed scan codes, releases them and returns the list. Pairs well with restore_state and restore_modifiers.

keyboard.restore_state(scan_codes)

[source]

Given a list of scan_codes ensures these keys, and only these keys, are pressed. Pairs well with stash_state, alternative to restore_modifiers.

keyboard.restore_modifiers(scan_codes)

[source]

Like restore_state, but only restores modifier keys.

keyboard.write(text, delay=0, restore_state_after=True, exact=None)

[source]

Sends artificial keyboard events to the OS, simulating the typing of a given text. Characters not available on the keyboard are typed as explicit unicode characters using OS-specific functionality, such as alt+codepoint.

To ensure text integrity, all currently pressed keys are released before the text is typed, and modifiers are restored afterwards.

  • delay is the number of seconds to wait between keypresses, defaults to no delay.
  • restore_state_after can be used to restore the state of pressed keys after the text is typed, i.e. presses the keys that were released at the beginning. Defaults to True.
  • exact forces typing all characters as explicit unicode (e.g. alt+codepoint or special events). If None, uses platform-specific suggested value.

keyboard.wait(hotkey=None, suppress=False, trigger_on_release=False)

[source]

Blocks the program execution until the given hotkey is pressed or, if given no parameters, blocks forever.

keyboard.get_hotkey_name(names=None)

[source]

Returns a string representation of hotkey from the given key names, or the currently pressed keys if not given. This function:

  • normalizes names;
  • removes "left" and "right" prefixes;
  • replaces the "+" key name with "plus" to avoid ambiguity;
  • puts modifier keys first, in a standardized order;
  • sort remaining keys;
  • finally, joins everything with "+".

Example:


get_hotkey_name(['+', 'left ctrl', 'shift'])
# "ctrl+shift+plus"

keyboard.read_event(suppress=False)

[source]

Blocks until a keyboard event happens, then returns that event.

keyboard.read_key(suppress=False)

[source]

Blocks until a keyboard event happens, then returns that event's name or, if missing, its scan code.

keyboard.read_hotkey(suppress=True)

[source]

Similar to read_key(), but blocks until the user presses and releases a hotkey (or single key), then returns a string representing the hotkey pressed.

Example:


read_hotkey()
# "ctrl+shift+p"

keyboard.get_typed_strings(events, allow_backspace=True)

[source]

Given a sequence of events, tries to deduce what strings were typed. Strings are separated when a non-textual key is pressed (such as tab or enter). Characters are converted to uppercase according to shift and capslock status. If allow_backspace is True, backspaces remove the last character typed.

This function is a generator, so you can pass an infinite stream of events and convert them to strings in real time.

Note this functions is merely an heuristic. Windows for example keeps per- process keyboard state such as keyboard layout, and this information is not available for our hooks.


get_type_strings(record()) #-> ['This is what', 'I recorded', '']

keyboard.start_recording(recorded_events_queue=None)

[source]

Starts recording all keyboard events into a global variable, or the given queue if any. Returns the queue of events and the hooked function.

Use stop_recording() or unhook(hooked_function) to stop.

keyboard.stop_recording()

[source]

Stops the global recording of events and returns a list of the events captured.

keyboard.record(until='escape', suppress=False, trigger_on_release=False)

[source]

Records all keyboard events from all keyboards until the user presses the given hotkey. Then returns the list of events recorded, of type keyboard.KeyboardEvent. Pairs well with play(events).

Note: this is a blocking function. Note: for more details on the keyboard hook and events see hook.

keyboard.play(events, speed_factor=1.0)

[source]

Plays a sequence of recorded events, maintaining the relative time intervals. If speed_factor is <= 0 then the actions are replayed as fast as the OS allows. Pairs well with record().

Note: the current keyboard state is cleared at the beginning and restored at the end of the function.

keyboard.add_word_listener(word, callback, triggers=['space'], match_suffix=False, timeout=2)

[source]

Invokes a callback every time a sequence of characters is typed (e.g. 'pet') and followed by a trigger key (e.g. space). Modifiers (e.g. alt, ctrl, shift) are ignored.

  • word the typed text to be matched. E.g. 'pet'.
  • callback is an argument-less function to be invoked each time the word is typed.
  • triggers is the list of keys that will cause a match to be checked. If the user presses some key that is not a character (len>1) and not in triggers, the characters so far will be discarded. By default the trigger is only space.
  • match_suffix defines if endings of words should also be checked instead of only whole words. E.g. if true, typing 'carpet'+space will trigger the listener for 'pet'. Defaults to false, only whole words are checked.
  • timeout is the maximum number of seconds between typed characters before the current word is discarded. Defaults to 2 seconds.

Returns the event handler created. To remove a word listener use remove_word_listener(word) or remove_word_listener(handler).

Note: all actions are performed on key down. Key up events are ignored. Note: word matches are case sensitive.

keyboard.remove_word_listener(word_or_handler)

[source]

Removes a previously registered word listener. Accepts either the word used during registration (exact string) or the event handler returned by the add_word_listener or add_abbreviation functions.

keyboard.add_abbreviation(source_text, replacement_text, match_suffix=False, timeout=2)

[source]

Registers a hotkey that replaces one typed text with another. For example


add_abbreviation('tm', u'™')

Replaces every "tm" followed by a space with a ™ symbol (and no space). The replacement is done by sending backspace events.

  • match_suffix defines if endings of words should also be checked instead of only whole words. E.g. if true, typing 'carpet'+space will trigger the listener for 'pet'. Defaults to false, only whole words are checked.
  • timeout is the maximum number of seconds between typed characters before the current word is discarded. Defaults to 2 seconds.

For more details see add_word_listener.

keyboard.normalize_name(name)

[source]

Given a key name (e.g. "LEFT CONTROL"), clean up the string and convert to the canonical representation (e.g. "left ctrl") if one is known.

Author: boppreh
Source Code: https://github.com/boppreh/keyboard
License: MIT License

#python #keyboard 

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