Hermann  Frami

Hermann Frami

1656080760

Serverless Plugin: AWS API Gateway integration Helper

Serverless Plugin: AWS Api Gateway integration helper

Overview

The plugin provides the functionality to merge OpenApiSpecification files (formerly known as swagger) with one or multiple YML files containing the the x-amazon-apigateway extensions. There are several use-cases to keep both information separated, e.g. it is needed to deploy different api gateway integrations depending on a stage environment.

When dealing with functional tests you do not want to test the production environment, but only a mocking response.

The plugin supports YML based OpenApi3 specification files only

Features

  • deploy stage dependent x-amazon-apigateway integrations
  • separate infrastructure (aws) from openapi specification
  • use mock integrations for functional testing
  • auto-generating CORS methods, headers and api gateway mocking response
  • hook into package & deploy lifeCycle and generate combined openApi files on the fly during deployment
  • auto-inject generated openApi file into the Body property of specified API Gateway
  • generate mocking responses without specifying x-amazon-apigateway-integration objects
  • generate request-validation blocks
  • generate all required x-amazon-apigateway-integration objects automatically
  • full proxy generation support with [NEW]: feature: PROXY Manager

See the examples folder for a full working example

Installation & Setup

Run npm install in your Serverless project.

$ npm install --save-dev serverless-openapi-integration-helper

Add the plugin to your serverless.yml file

plugins:
  - serverless-openapi-integration-helper

Plugin configuration

You can configure the plugin under the key openApiIntegration. See See Configuration Reference for a list of available options

The mapping array must be used to configure where the files containing the x-amazon-apigateway-integration blocks are located.

openApiIntegration:
    package: true #New feature! Hook into the package & deploy process
    inputFile: schema.yml
    mapping:
       - stage: [dev, prod] #multiple stages
         path: integrations
       - stage: test #single stage
         path: mocks

In the above example all YML files inside the integrations directory will be processed and merged with the schema.yml file when deploying the dev stage

serverless deploy --stage=dev

To use a different x-amazon-apigateway to perform functional tests (with mocking responses e.g) the directory mock is processed and merged with the schema.yml file when deploying the test stage

serverless deploy --stage=test

Usage

You can setup a fully working API GATEWAY with any openApi 3.0 specification file First create the input file containing the OpenApiSpecification

# ./schema.yml
openapi: 3.0.0
info:
  description: User Registration
  version: 1.0.0
  title: UserRegistration
paths:
  /api/v1/user:
    post:
      summary: adds a user
      requestBody:
        content:
          application/json:
            schema:
              $ref: '#/components/schemas/Customer'
      responses:
        '201':
          description: user created
components:
  schemas:
    Customer:
      type: object
      required:
        - email_address
        - password
      properties:
        email_address:
          type: string
          example: test@example.com
        password:
          type: string
          format: password
          example: someStrongPassword#

The plugin will generate the x-amazon-apigateway integrations objects for all methods that do not have an integration.

#generate a file containing a gateway mock integration in the directory /mocks
serverless integration create --output mocks --type mock --stage=test

#generate a file containing the production integration in the directory integrations/
serverless integration create --output integrations --type http --stage=prod

Supported types are

  • http_proxy
  • http
  • aws
  • aws_proxy
  • mock

The plugin now generates a merged file during deployment that is automatically injected in your serverless resources

#Create OpenApi File containing mocking responses (usable in functional tests) and deploy to ApiGateway
serverless deploy --stage==test
#Create OpenApi File containing the production integration and deploy to ApiGateway
serverless deploy --stage=prod

The generated output is automatically injected in the resources.Resources.YOUR_API_GATEWAY.Properties.Body property

resources:
  Resources:
    ApiGatewayRestApi:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::RestApi
      Properties:
        ApiKeySourceType: HEADER
        Body: ~ #autogenerated by plugin
        Description: "Some Description"
        FailOnWarnings: false
        Name: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}-some-name
        EndpointConfiguration:
          Types:
            - REGIONAL
    ApiGatewayDeployment:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Deployment
      Properties:
        RestApiId:
          Ref: ApiGatewayRestApi
        StageName: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}

Commands

Manual merge

The generate command can be used independently with

serverless integration merge --stage=dev

Of course then the API Gateway Body property has to be specified manually

resources:
  Resources:
    ApiGatewayRestApi:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::RestApi
      Properties:
        ApiKeySourceType: HEADER
        Body: ${file(openapi-integration/api.yml)}

CORS generator

The plugin can generate full CORS support out of the box.

openApiIntegration:
  cors: true
  ...

If enabled, the plugin generates all required OPTIONS methods as well as the required header informations and adds a mocking response to API Gateway. You can customize the CORS templates by placing your own files inside a directory openapi-integration (in your project root). The following files can be overwritten:

FilenameDescription
headers.ymlAll headers required for CORS support
integration.ymlContains the x-amazon-apigateway-integration block
path.ymlOpenApi specification for the OPTIONS method
response-parameters.ymlThe response Parameters of the x-amazon-apigateway-integration responses

See the EXAMPLES directory for detailed instructions.

Auto Mock Generator

If enabled, the plugin generates mocking responses for all methods that do not have an x-amazon-apigateway-integration block defined. It takes the first 2xx response defined in the openApi specification and generates a simple mocking response on the fly

openApiIntegration:
  autoMock: true
  ...

When using the autoMock feature, you do not need to specify inputPath mappings, since all endpoints are mocked automatically

openApiIntegration:
    package: true
    inputFile: schema.yml
    mapping: ~

VALIDATION generator

The plugin supports full request validation out of the box

openApiIntegration:
  validation: true
  ...

If enabled, the plugin generates the x-amazon-apigateway-request-validators blocks and adds a basic request validation to all methods. You can customize the VALIDATION template by placing your own files inside a directory openapi-integration (in your project root). The following files can be overwritten:

FilenameDescription
request-validator.ymlThe x-amazon-apigateway-request-validators block

See the EXAMPLES directory for detailed instructions.

Proxy Manager

The proxymanager feature automates the complete generation of an HTTP proxy integration. You only have to define the target URL and all necessary AWS integration blocks are generated on-the-fly during deployment.

openApiIntegration:
   cors: true
   validation: true
   mapping:
      - stage: [dev, prod]
        proxyManager:
           type: http_proxy
           baseUrl: https://www.example.com
           pattern: "(?<=api\/v1)\/.+"
  ...

With this setting, no separate integration files need to be created

A combination of your own and auto-generated files is still possible without any problems

Proxy Manager configuration

type

at the moment only http_proxy supported

baseUrl

The base url is required to map the path variable from the openapi specification to the URI from the aws integration.

Example:

#original openapi specification
paths:
   /api/v1/user:
    post:
      ... 

will be translated to

#generated openapi specification output
paths:
   /api/v1/user:
      post:
         ...
         x-amazon-apigateway-integration:
            type: http_proxy
            passthroughBehavior: when_no_match
            httpMethod: POST
            uri: https://www.example.com/api/v1/user

pattern

The pattern can be used to adapt the mapping of the base url using regexp, to remove a prefix, or a version string

Example:

baseUrl: https://www.example.com
pattern: "(?<=api\/v1)\/.+"

will translate the route /api/v1/user to https://www.example.com/user

Configuration Reference

configure the plugin under the key openApiIntegration

openApiIntegration:
  inputFile: schema.yml #required
  package: true #optional, defaults to false 
  inputDirectory: ./ #optional, defaults to ./
  cors: true #optional, defaults to false
  autoMock: true #optional, defaults to false
  validation: true #optional, defaults to false
  mapping: #optional, can be completely blank if autoMock option is enabled
    - stage: [dev, prod] #multiple stages
      path: integrations
      proxyManager: #optional
         type: http_proxy
         baseUrl: https://example.com
         pattern: "(?<=v1)\/.+"
    - stage: test #single stage
      path: mocks/customer.yml
  outputFile: api.yml #optional, defaults to api.yml
  outputDirectory: openapi-integration #optional, defaults to ./openapi-integration

Known Issues

Stage deployment

When using serverless framework only to deploy your aws resources without having any lambda functions or triggers, the AWS Gateway deploymemt does not behave as expected. Any deployment to an existing stage will be ignored, since CloudFormation does not redeploy a stage if the DeploymentIdentifier has not changed.

The plugin serverless-random-gateway-deployment-id solves this problem by adding a random id to the deployment-name and all references to it on every deploy

See the examples folder for a full working example

Variable Resolving

Serverless variables inside the openapi integration files are not resolved correctly when using the package & deploy hooks. This problem can be solved by using the api gateway STAGE VARIABLES.

See the examples folder for a full working example

Example

service:
  name: user-registration

provider:
  name: aws
  stage: dev
  region: eu-central-1

plugins:
  - serverless-openapi-integration-helper
  
openApiIntegration:
  inputFile: schema.yml
  package: true
  mapping:
    - path: integrations
      stage: [dev, prod]
    - path: mocks/customer.yml
      stage: test

functions:

resources:
  Resources:
    ApiGatewayRestApi:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::RestApi
      Properties:
        ApiKeySourceType: HEADER
        Body: ~
        Description: "Some Description"
        FailOnWarnings: false
        Name: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}-some-name
        EndpointConfiguration:
          Types:
            - REGIONAL
    ApiGatewayDeployment:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Deployment
      Properties:
        RestApiId:
          Ref: ApiGatewayRestApi
        StageName: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}
serverless deploy --stage=test
serverless deploy --stage=prod

Approach to a functional test of schema validation

The plugin works well in combination with the serverless-plugin-test-helper to automate tests against the deployed api gateway

Install The plugin test helper package

npm install --save-dev serverless-plugin-test-helper

add the plugin as a plugin dependency in your serverless configuration file and configure the plugin according to the Readme

#./serveless.yml
plugins:
  - serverless-plugin-test-helper
  - serverless-openapi-integration-helper

[...]

resources:
   Outputs:
      GatewayUrl: # This is the key that will be used in the generated outputs file
         Description: This is a helper for functional tests
         Value: !Join
            - ''
            - - 'https://'
              - !Ref ApiGatewayRestApi
              - '.execute-api.'
              - ${opt:region, self:provider.region}
              - '.amazonaws.com/'
              - ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}

   Resources:
    ApiGatewayRestApi:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::RestApi
      Properties:
        ApiKeySourceType: HEADER
        Body: ~
        Description: User Registration (${opt:stage, self:provider.stage})
        FailOnWarnings: false
        Name: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}-gateway
        EndpointConfiguration:
          Types:
            - REGIONAL
    ApiGatewayDeployment:
      Type: AWS::ApiGateway::Deployment
      Properties:
        RestApiId:
          Ref: ApiGatewayRestApi
        StageName: ${opt:stage, self:provider.stage}

Testing the schema validation

Add a functional test (e.g. with jest)

//tests/registration.js
import {getOutput} from 'serverless-plugin-test-helper';
import axios from 'axios';

axios.defaults.adapter = require('axios/lib/adapters/http'); //Todo

const URL = getOutput('GatewayUrl');
test('request validation on registration', async () => {
    expect.assertions(1);
    const {status} = await axios.post(URL + '/api/v1/user',
        {
            "email_address": "test@example.com",
            "password": "someStrongPassword#"
        },
        {
            headers: {
                'Content-Type': 'application/json',
            }
        });
    expect(status).toEqual(201);
});

test('request validation on registration (invalid request)', async () => {
    expect.assertions(1);
    try {
        await axios.post(URL + '/api/v1/user',
            {
                "email": "test@example.com"
            },
            {
                headers: {
                    'Content-Type': 'application/json',
                }
            });
    } catch (e) {
        expect(e.response).toMatchObject({
            statusText: 'Bad Request',
            status: 400
        });
    }
});

Then perform the functional test

serverless deploy --stage=test
npm test
serverless remove --stage=test

The command will

  • merge the openapi specification file with the MOCK integration configured before
  • deploy to API Gateway in an isolated TEST infrastructure environment (your other environments will not be affected since we are deploying to a separated gateway)
  • perform the test and verify that schema validation is correct
  • remove all TEST resources if test succeeded

See the examples folder for a full working example

Feedback is appreciated! If you have an idea for how this plugin/library can be improved (or even just a complaint/criticism) then please open an issue.

Author: yndlingsfar
Source Code: https://github.com/yndlingsfar/serverless-openapi-integration-helper 
License: MIT license

#serverless #openapi #aws 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Serverless Plugin: AWS API Gateway integration Helper
Einar  Hintz

Einar Hintz

1599364620

API Integration Practices and Patterns

We all hear it so often that we almost stop hearing it: “Integration is critical to meeting users’ needs.”

Integration work consumes 50%-80% of the time and budget of digital transformation projects, or building a digital platform, while innovation gets only the leftovers, according to SAP and Salesforce. And as everyone from legacy enterprises to SaaS startups launches new digital products, they all hit a point at which the product cannot unlock more value for users or continue to grow without making integration a feature.

If I were to sum up the one question behind all of the other questions that I hear from customers, enterprises, partners, and developers, it would be something like: “Is integration a differentiator that we should own? Or an undifferentiated but necessary feature that supports what we’re trying to accomplish?”

This Refcard won’t try to answer that question for you. Rather, no matter what type of development work you do, API integration is a fact of life today, like gravity. Why? Today, experience is paramount. The average enterprise uses more than 1,500 cloud applications (with the number growing by 20% each year). Every app needs to integrate with other systems in a fluid and ever-changing application ecosystem. So instead, I’ll share some of the common practices you’re likely to contend with as well as some patterns to consider.


This is a preview of the API Integrations Practices and Patterns Refcard. To read the entire Refcard, please download the PDF from the link above.

#apis #api integration #integration patterns #api cloud #api patterns #api authentication #api errors #apis and integrations

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1601381326

Public ASX100 APIs: The Essential List

We’ve conducted some initial research into the public APIs of the ASX100 because we regularly have conversations about what others are doing with their APIs and what best practices look like. Being able to point to good local examples and explain what is happening in Australia is a key part of this conversation.

Method

The method used for this initial research was to obtain a list of the ASX100 (as of 18 September 2020). Then work through each company looking at the following:

  1. Whether the company had a public API: this was found by googling “[company name] API” and “[company name] API developer” and “[company name] developer portal”. Sometimes the company’s website was navigated or searched.
  2. Some data points about the API were noted, such as the URL of the portal/documentation and the method they used to publish the API (portal, documentation, web page).
  3. Observations were recorded that piqued the interest of the researchers (you will find these below).
  4. Other notes were made to support future research.
  5. You will find a summary of the data in the infographic below.

Data

With regards to how the APIs are shared:

#api #api-development #api-analytics #apis #api-integration #api-testing #api-security #api-gateway

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598408880

How To Unite AWS KMS with Serverless Application Model (SAM)

The Basics

AWS KMS is a Key Management Service that let you create Cryptographic keys that you can use to encrypt and decrypt data and also other keys. You can read more about it here.

Important points about Keys

Please note that the customer master keys(CMK) generated can only be used to encrypt small amount of data like passwords, RSA key. You can use AWS KMS CMKs to generate, encrypt, and decrypt data keys. However, AWS KMS does not store, manage, or track your data keys, or perform cryptographic operations with data keys.

You must use and manage data keys outside of AWS KMS. KMS API uses AWS KMS CMK in the encryption operations and they cannot accept more than 4 KB (4096 bytes) of data. To encrypt application data, use the server-side encryption features of an AWS service, or a client-side encryption library, such as the AWS Encryption SDK or the Amazon S3 encryption client.

Scenario

We want to create signup and login forms for a website.

Passwords should be encrypted and stored in DynamoDB database.

What do we need?

  1. KMS key to encrypt and decrypt data
  2. DynamoDB table to store password.
  3. Lambda functions & APIs to process Login and Sign up forms.
  4. Sign up/ Login forms in HTML.

Lets Implement it as Serverless Application Model (SAM)!

Lets first create the Key that we will use to encrypt and decrypt password.

KmsKey:
    Type: AWS::KMS::Key
    Properties: 
      Description: CMK for encrypting and decrypting
      KeyPolicy:
        Version: '2012-10-17'
        Id: key-default-1
        Statement:
        - Sid: Enable IAM User Permissions
          Effect: Allow
          Principal:
            AWS: !Sub arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:root
          Action: kms:*
          Resource: '*'
        - Sid: Allow administration of the key
          Effect: Allow
          Principal:
            AWS: !Sub arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:user/${KeyAdmin}
          Action:
          - kms:Create*
          - kms:Describe*
          - kms:Enable*
          - kms:List*
          - kms:Put*
          - kms:Update*
          - kms:Revoke*
          - kms:Disable*
          - kms:Get*
          - kms:Delete*
          - kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion
          - kms:CancelKeyDeletion
          Resource: '*'
        - Sid: Allow use of the key
          Effect: Allow
          Principal:
            AWS: !Sub arn:aws:iam::${AWS::AccountId}:user/${KeyUser}
          Action:
          - kms:DescribeKey
          - kms:Encrypt
          - kms:Decrypt
          - kms:ReEncrypt*
          - kms:GenerateDataKey
          - kms:GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext
          Resource: '*'

The important thing in above snippet is the KeyPolicy. KMS requires a Key Administrator and Key User. As a best practice your Key Administrator and Key User should be 2 separate user in your Organisation. We are allowing all permissions to the root users.

So if your key Administrator leaves the organisation, the root user will be able to delete this key. As you can see **KeyAdmin **can manage the key but not use it and KeyUser can only use the key. ${KeyAdmin} and **${KeyUser} **are parameters in the SAM template.

You would be asked to provide values for these parameters during SAM Deploy.

#aws #serverless #aws-sam #aws-key-management-service #aws-certification #aws-api-gateway #tutorial-for-beginners #aws-blogs

Ryan  Schneider

Ryan Schneider

1595418900

Serverless Express – Easy APIs On AWS Lambda & AWS HTTP API

TLDR - Take existing Express.js apps and host them easily onto cheap, auto-scaling, serverless infrastructure on AWS Lambda and AWS HTTP API with Serverless Express. It’s packed loads of production-ready features, like custom domains, SSL certificates, canary deployments, and costs ~$0.000003 per request.

If you simply want to host a common Express.js Node.js application, have it auto-scale to billions of requests, and charge you only when it’s used, we have something special for you…

Announcing Serverless Express, a Serverless Framework offering enabling you to easily host and manage Express.js applications on AWS Lambda and the new AWS HTTP API, which is 60% faster and 71% cheaper than their initial API Gateway product.

Serverless Expess is a pure Express.js experience and it’s perfect for those that want to focus on apps, not infrastructure complexity.

Here are the highlights:

  • Easy, Safe, Performance - Includes the optimal infrastructure pattern for cost, performance & scale.
  • Never Pay For Idle - No API requests? No cost. Averages ~$0.000003 per request.
  • Zero Configuration - Add your Express app, then deploy (advanced config options are available).
  • Fast Deployments - Deploy changes to the cloud in seconds.
  • Real-time Logging - Rapidly develop on the cloud w/ real-time logs and errors in the CLI.
  • Canary Deployments - Deploy your app gradually to a subset of your traffic.
  • Custom Domain + SSL - Auto-configure a custom domain w/ a free AWS ACM SSL certificate.
  • Team Collaboration - Collaborate with your teamates with shared state and outputs.

Here is how to get started and deliver a Serverless Express.js based API with a custom domain, free SSL certificate and much more! You can also check out our Serverless Fullstack Application boilerplate, which includes Serverless Express in a real-world example that features a database, website using React and more.

Set-Up

Serverless Express is a Serverless Framework Component (i.e premium experiences for popular serverless use-cases) and you’ll need to install Node.js and the Serverless Framework CLI to use it.

Install Node.js here.

Then run this command to install Serverless Framework.

npm i -g serverless

Next, install the Serverless Express template:

serverless create --template-url https://github.com/serverless/components/tree/master/templates/express

Lastly, Serverless Express deploys onto your own Amazon Web Services account, so you’ll need Access Keys to an AWS account you own. Follow this guide to create those.

After you have created AWS Access Keys you can add them directly to an .env file, or reference an AWS Profile in a .env file, within the root of the template you installed.

AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=123456789
AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=123456789

You can also reference an AWS Profile in a .env file like this.

AWS_PROFILE=default

If you don’t include a .env file, the Serverless Framework will automatically look for a default AWS Profile in the root folder of your machine.

Also, Serverless Framework has a built-in stages concept. If you change the stage it will deploy a totally separate copy of your serverless application.

# serverless.yml
component: express@1.0.8
  name: express-api
  stage: prod

Even better, you can use different .env files for each stage by simply using this convention:

.env # all stages
.env.dev # "dev" stage
.env.prod # "prod" stage

One last—often overlooked—step is to install the Express.js dependency, by running npm i in the template.

#serverless #apis #aws #aws lambda #aws http api

Lindsey  Koepp

Lindsey Koepp

1603674601

Integrating API Gateway — Lambda Responses

Probably the most used, versatile and oldest combination between AWS cloud services is REST APIs (public) with Lambda integration on the backend [1]. While RESTful API development is not at all new, if you are relatively new to developing in the cloud, working with these two services may be somewhat challenging. This article requires a basic understanding of these two services. Its focus is beyond the point where you are able to invoke a Lambda function and receive status code 200 from the API. Given the availability of SNS and CloudWatch Logs, why would one bother integrating the API Method & Integration Responses past returning code 200? The answer is that would be a half implemented feature, which lets users speculating about what the result of the invocation was. This article shows how to program an API to return status codes that make sense to your application.

My Use Case

I shall focus on a Lambda function which may throw unexpected exceptions, errors and return a response. To make this more challenging, I am going to use Python. This language is a big hit with developers transitioning from traditional scientific and engineering roles, who have not used any “JS” languages. The intention is to create a foundation on which further API development can be done or at least leave the API in a minimum viable state.

My Solution

I started creating the Lambda function, which I called DanielHTTP. The function uses the latest Python runtime and the IAM policy AWSLambdaBasicExecutionRole which allows CloudWatch logs to be created. I created a role called the same and attached the policy. Alternatively, when this function is created, I could have selected Create New Role to have this done automatically. The function code is available in my GitHub repository [2]. The code is designed to throw an exception by performing an illegal operation, to raise exceptions and errors and to return an Ok response. All cases are individually handled in the API.

#api-gateway #api-development #api-integration #aws-lambda #aws