SaaS vs Open Core Software

What is the difference between SaaS and Open Core?

My previous post in this series was a brief introduction of SaaS and Open Core business models in the B2B space. To summarize: I concluded that SaaS is the dominant and default model for selling software but there are signs that a new model is getting traction, Commercial Open Source Software (“COSS”), of which a common monetization strategy is Open Core (proprietary features on the crust of an open core).

I also received some feedback on that post that the SaaS and COSS models are orthogonal and you could do both. This is quite true! However, when starting a company or even an idea, it is usually wise to be laser focused on what you are building.

As an example, we can use Teleport (our modern replacement for OpenSSH). It is open source software that is monetized through an Open Core model. One of its most desirable features is the unified audit log with session replay. The storage of this audit log is configurable and this configurability comes with increased development costs and design trade-offs.

If Teleport was a SaaS product, we could have picked a suitable storage back-end from the vast menu of options available on AWS. On the other hand, we would have had to develop a secure, multi-tenant control plane to allow thousands of customers to manage SSH and Kubernetes access to their environments.

Doing all of these things initially would be expensive. So most startups or developers make the correct decision of starting with either a proprietary SaaS or an open source, installable / on-prem offering. Proprietary, installable software may also be an option but I don’t see that as a popular choice these days.

Initial Offering Matrix of Open Core vs SaaS

Generally speaking, in the B2B market, the advantage of the Open Source model is that it is easier to build awareness; the advantage of the proprietary, SaaS model is that it is easier to monetize.

Once an initial offering has some traction, it may be wise to attempt to take advantage of the other business model’s strengths:

  • Open Source starts to offers additional proprietary features on the crust of the open source core as a monetization strategy (eg. MapR EnterpriseInfluxDB Enterprise).
  • Perhaps to a lesser extent, but some B2B SaaS companies open source ancillary tools built to deliver the solution in order to build awareness for product marketing or recruiting (eg. Twilio Open Source ProjectsSegment Open Source). This practice is much more common with large B2C companies and may even become the foundation of future Open Core companies (eg. Uber Open SourceFacebook Open Source).

Sharing Business Models Between Open Core vs SaaS

Likewise, a different delivery method may be used to unlock a new market:

  • In the case of Open Core, hosting the offering may improve ease of use and make it easier to offer usage based billing and sell to smaller buyers (eg. Elastic CloudGitlab SaaS).
  • In the case of SaaS, selling an on-premises version (which may mean in the customer’s cloud account) may make it easier to sell to the enterprise, public sector or other security minded customers (eg. Github EnterpriseMulesoft Anypoint Private Cloud).

Sharing Delivery Methods Between Open Core vs SaaS

So we can see a simple distinction between Open Core and proprietary SaaS is difficult to make.

Joseph Jacks offers a straightforward way of defining commercial open source companies as those that would not exist if their underlying open source core didn’t exist. (By the way, I recommend reading the OSS Capital blog and especially this post if you are looking for a broader (and more nuanced) market perspective on these topics.)

Since I am focused on the operator’s perspective, I’d like to keep this comparison limited to the most common initial offerings - proprietary SaaS and Open Core that runs on-premises (not through SaaS delivery). An additional point of clarification: running on-premises may just mean the customer’s cloud account and not actually on their own servers.

#saas #open core

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SaaS vs Open Core Software
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jQuery Ajax CRUD in ASP.NET Core MVC with Modal Popup

In this article, we’ll discuss how to use jQuery Ajax for ASP.NET Core MVC CRUD Operations using Bootstrap Modal. With jQuery Ajax, we can make HTTP request to controller action methods without reloading the entire page, like a single page application.

To demonstrate CRUD operations – insert, update, delete and retrieve, the project will be dealing with details of a normal bank transaction. GitHub repository for this demo project : https://bit.ly/33KTJAu.

Sub-topics discussed :

  • Form design for insert and update operation.
  • Display forms in modal popup dialog.
  • Form post using jQuery Ajax.
  • Implement MVC CRUD operations with jQuery Ajax.
  • Loading spinner in .NET Core MVC.
  • Prevent direct access to MVC action method.

Create ASP.NET Core MVC Project

In Visual Studio 2019, Go to File > New > Project (Ctrl + Shift + N).

From new project window, Select Asp.Net Core Web Application_._

Image showing how to create ASP.NET Core Web API project in Visual Studio.

Once you provide the project name and location. Select Web Application(Model-View-Controller) and uncheck HTTPS Configuration. Above steps will create a brand new ASP.NET Core MVC project.

Showing project template selection for .NET Core MVC.

Setup a Database

Let’s create a database for this application using Entity Framework Core. For that we’ve to install corresponding NuGet Packages. Right click on project from solution explorer, select Manage NuGet Packages_,_ From browse tab, install following 3 packages.

Showing list of NuGet Packages for Entity Framework Core

Now let’s define DB model class file – /Models/TransactionModel.cs.

public class TransactionModel
{
    [Key]
    public int TransactionId { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(12)")]
    [DisplayName("Account Number")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage ="This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(12,ErrorMessage ="Maximum 12 characters only")]
    public string AccountNumber { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Beneficiary Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BeneficiaryName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(100)")]
    [DisplayName("Bank Name")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public string BankName { get; set; }

    [Column(TypeName ="nvarchar(11)")]
    [DisplayName("SWIFT Code")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    [MaxLength(11)]
    public string SWIFTCode { get; set; }

    [DisplayName("Amount")]
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "This Field is required.")]
    public int Amount { get; set; }

    [DisplayFormat(DataFormatString = "{0:MM/dd/yyyy}")]
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

C#Copy

Here we’ve defined model properties for the transaction with proper validation. Now let’s define  DbContextclass for EF Core.

#asp.net core article #asp.net core #add loading spinner in asp.net core #asp.net core crud without reloading #asp.net core jquery ajax form #asp.net core modal dialog #asp.net core mvc crud using jquery ajax #asp.net core mvc with jquery and ajax #asp.net core popup window #bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core mvc. bootstrap modal popup in asp.net core #delete and viewall in asp.net core #jquery ajax - insert #jquery ajax form post #modal popup dialog in asp.net core #no direct access action method #update #validation in modal popup

Custom Software vs Off-the-shelf Software: How to select a better one for your business?

Custom Software or Off-the-shelf software, the question in mind for many business personnel. Read this blog to get help to make the right decision that will benefit your business.
For a business that wants to upgrade and modernize itself with the help of software, a common dilemma it is whether to go for custom-made software or opt for off-the-shelf software. You can find many top software development companies worldwide, but before that all, you should first decide the type of software –an off-the-shelf software or a custom one.
This blog aims to overcome the dilemma and accord some clarity to a business looking to automate its business processes.

#custom software vs off-the-shelf software #custom software development companies #top software development companies #off-the-shelf software development #customized software solution #custom software development

SaaS vs Open Core Software

What is the difference between SaaS and Open Core?

My previous post in this series was a brief introduction of SaaS and Open Core business models in the B2B space. To summarize: I concluded that SaaS is the dominant and default model for selling software but there are signs that a new model is getting traction, Commercial Open Source Software (“COSS”), of which a common monetization strategy is Open Core (proprietary features on the crust of an open core).

I also received some feedback on that post that the SaaS and COSS models are orthogonal and you could do both. This is quite true! However, when starting a company or even an idea, it is usually wise to be laser focused on what you are building.

As an example, we can use Teleport (our modern replacement for OpenSSH). It is open source software that is monetized through an Open Core model. One of its most desirable features is the unified audit log with session replay. The storage of this audit log is configurable and this configurability comes with increased development costs and design trade-offs.

If Teleport was a SaaS product, we could have picked a suitable storage back-end from the vast menu of options available on AWS. On the other hand, we would have had to develop a secure, multi-tenant control plane to allow thousands of customers to manage SSH and Kubernetes access to their environments.

Doing all of these things initially would be expensive. So most startups or developers make the correct decision of starting with either a proprietary SaaS or an open source, installable / on-prem offering. Proprietary, installable software may also be an option but I don’t see that as a popular choice these days.

Initial Offering Matrix of Open Core vs SaaS

Generally speaking, in the B2B market, the advantage of the Open Source model is that it is easier to build awareness; the advantage of the proprietary, SaaS model is that it is easier to monetize.

Once an initial offering has some traction, it may be wise to attempt to take advantage of the other business model’s strengths:

  • Open Source starts to offers additional proprietary features on the crust of the open source core as a monetization strategy (eg. MapR EnterpriseInfluxDB Enterprise).
  • Perhaps to a lesser extent, but some B2B SaaS companies open source ancillary tools built to deliver the solution in order to build awareness for product marketing or recruiting (eg. Twilio Open Source ProjectsSegment Open Source). This practice is much more common with large B2C companies and may even become the foundation of future Open Core companies (eg. Uber Open SourceFacebook Open Source).

Sharing Business Models Between Open Core vs SaaS

Likewise, a different delivery method may be used to unlock a new market:

  • In the case of Open Core, hosting the offering may improve ease of use and make it easier to offer usage based billing and sell to smaller buyers (eg. Elastic CloudGitlab SaaS).
  • In the case of SaaS, selling an on-premises version (which may mean in the customer’s cloud account) may make it easier to sell to the enterprise, public sector or other security minded customers (eg. Github EnterpriseMulesoft Anypoint Private Cloud).

Sharing Delivery Methods Between Open Core vs SaaS

So we can see a simple distinction between Open Core and proprietary SaaS is difficult to make.

Joseph Jacks offers a straightforward way of defining commercial open source companies as those that would not exist if their underlying open source core didn’t exist. (By the way, I recommend reading the OSS Capital blog and especially this post if you are looking for a broader (and more nuanced) market perspective on these topics.)

Since I am focused on the operator’s perspective, I’d like to keep this comparison limited to the most common initial offerings - proprietary SaaS and Open Core that runs on-premises (not through SaaS delivery). An additional point of clarification: running on-premises may just mean the customer’s cloud account and not actually on their own servers.

#saas #open core

Software Developer vs Software Engineer — Differences: Bogus or Real?

Software Developers vs Software Engineers

Personally, it pisses me off. Every time I see an article on this topic, my emotional bank account gets robbed. They are all about SEO. Inappropriate keywords squeezed into tiny sentences just to get better rankings. No intent to entertain or enlighten the reader whatsoever. Sometimes, such articles can even be outright wrong.

And even though the purpose of this blog post can be to generate traffic, I tried to make it more of a meaningful rant than a lifeless academic essay.

So, let’s see how you feel by the time you are done reading this paper.

Without further ado:

Since there are no proper interpretations of both terms, a lot of people use them interchangeably.

However, some companies consider these terms as job titles.

The general “programmer-developer-engineer” trend goes along the lines of:

  • programmer is someone who knows how to code, understands algorithms and can follow instructions. Yet, it doesn’t go further in regards to responsibilities.
  • developer is someone superior to the programmer. Except for coding, they also do design, architecture, and technical documentation of the software component they are building. They might be referred to as leaders, but not necessarily.
  • Finally, an engineer implies that you are the real deal. You’ve graduated with a degree, have some tech knowledge, and preferably experience… and you are capable of designing a software system (a combination of software components your peons, the programmers, have built). You’re like an overseer. You can see the bigger picture. And it’s your responsibility to clearly explain that “picture” to your team.

#devops #software development #programming #software engineering #software developer #programmer #software engineer #software engineering career

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