Felix Kling

Felix Kling

1559204955

A Beginner's Guide to Redux

In this article, you’ll learn how to create a simple app using React and Redux, and how to secure your app using Okta for authentication.

React has gained a lot of popularity over the last few years, and Redux is a term often heard in combination with it. While technically separate concepts, they do work quite nicely together. React is a component-based framework, often used to create a Single-Page App (SPA), but can also be used to add any amount of independent components to any website. Redux is a state management system with a great set of dev tools useful for debugging.

When To Use Redux With React

React components can accept properties as well as manage their own state. Redux provides a global app state that any component can link into.

Redux is not something that every app needs. While it has its advantages, it can also add quite a bit of complexity. There is also a myriad of variants on redux to try to simplify it, and there are countless ways to architect the files needed. Generally, redux should not be added to any project without a good understanding of why you need it. Here are a few examples of what React-Redux can give you over a vanilla React approach:

  • Redux gives you a global state. This can be helpful when you have deeply nested components that need to share the same state. Rather than passing unrelated properties down the component tree, you can simply access the Redux store.
  • Debugging can be much simpler.
    You can rewind the data to specific points to see the state of the app before or after any given action.It’s possible to log all actions a user took to get to a specific point (say an app crash, for example).Hot-reloading is more reliable if the state is stored outside the component itself.* Business logic can be moved into the Redux actions to separate business logic from components.

Create a Search App in React

This will be a pretty simplified example, but hopefully gives you an idea what some of the benefits are of using Redux in a React app. TV Maze provides an open API for querying TV shows. I’ll show you how to create an app that lets you search through TV shows and display details for each show.

Assuming you have Node installed on your system, you’ll next need to make sure you have yarn and create-react-app in order to complete this tutorial. You can install both by using the following command line:

npm i -g yarn@1.13.0 create-react-app@2.1.3


Now you can quickly bootstrap a new React app with the following command:

create-react-app react-redux


That will create a new directory called react-redux, add some files for a skeleton project, and install all the dependencies you need to get up and running. Now you can start the app with the following:

cd react-redux
yarn start


Set Up Redux for Your React App

First, you’ll want to install the dependencies you’ll need. Use the following command:

yarn add redux@4.0.1 react-redux@6.0.0 redux-starter-kit@0.4.3


Redux Actions

Redux has a few moving parts. You’ll need actions that you can dispatch to tell redux you want to perform some action. Each action should have a type, as well as some sort of payload. Create a new file, src/actions.js with the following code:

export const SEARCH_SHOWS = 'SEARCH_SHOWS';
export const SELECT_SHOW = 'SELECT_SHOW';

export const searchShows = term => async dispatch => {
  const url = new URL('https://api.tvmaze.com/search/shows');
  url.searchParams.set('q', term);

  const response = await fetch(url);
  const results = await response.json();

  dispatch({ type: SEARCH_SHOWS, results, term });
};

export const selectShow = (id = null) => ({ type: SELECT_SHOW, id });


You’ll be using redux-thunk, which allows us to handle actions asynchronously. In the example above, selectShow is a simple, synchronous action, which just selects a show using a given ID. On the other hand, searchShows is async, so instead of returning a JSON object, it returns a function that accepts a dispatch function. When the action is finished, instead of returning the payload, you pass it into the dispatch function.

Redux Reducers

The next thing you’ll need is a reducer to tell redux how an action should affect the data store. Reducers should be pure functions that return a new state object rather than mutating the original state. Create a new file, src/reducers.js with the following code:

import { combineReducers } from 'redux';
import { SEARCH_SHOWS, SELECT_SHOW } from './actions';

const initialShowState = {
  detail: {},
  search: {},
  selected: null,
};

const shows = (state = initialShowState, action) => {
  switch (action.type) {
    case SEARCH_SHOWS:
      const detail = { ...state.detail };
      action.results.forEach(({ show }) => {
        detail[show.id] = show;
      });

      return {
        detail,
        search: {
          ...state.search,
          [action.term]: action.results.map(({ show }) => show.id),
        },
      };
    case SELECT_SHOW:
      return {
        ...state,
        selected: action.id,
      };
    default:
      return state;
  }
};

export default combineReducers({
  shows,
});


In this example, you have a single shows reducer, and its state will be stored in state.shows. It’s common to separate logic into different sections using this method, combining them using combineReducers.

The reducer takes the current state object. If the state is undefined, which will be true during initialization, then you will want to provide a default, or initial, state. You then need to look at the type of the action to determine what you should do with the data.

Here, you have the SEARCH_SHOWS action, which will update the detail cache for each object and store a list of search results by ID. The data that TV Maze returns looks like:

[
  { score: 14.200962, show: { id: 139, name: "Girls", /* ... */ } },
  { score: 13.4214735, show: { id: 23542, name: "Good Girls", /* ... */ } },
  // ...
]


This was simplified in the reducer, so the detail for each show is stored by ID, and the search results are just an array of IDs stored by the search term. This will cut down on memory because you won’t need a separate copy of each show detail for each search term.

For the SELECT_SHOW action, you just set selected to the ID of the show.

If you don’t recognize the action, you should just return the state as it is currently. This is important so that the state doesn’t become undefined.

Redux Store

Now that you have your reducer, you can create the store. This is made easy by redux-starter-kit. A lot of the boilerplate has been moved into that, making it customizable but with some very reasonable defaults (such as including Redux Thunk to handle async actions and hooking into Redux Devtools for better debugging). Create a new file src/store.js with the following code:

import { configureStore } from 'redux-starter-kit';
import reducer from './reducers';

export default configureStore({ reducer });


React Redux

React and Redux are really two separate concepts. In order to get Redux working with your app, you’ll need to use react-redux to bridge the two pieces (strictly speaking, it’s not 100% necessary to use react-redux, but it makes things a lot simpler). Replace the contents of src/App.js with the following:

import React from 'react';

import { Provider } from 'react-redux';
import store from './store';

const App = () => (
  <div>TODO: Build TV search components</div>
);

export default () => (
  <Provider store={store}>
    <App />
  </Provider>
);


The Provider component has access to the store and passes it along to child components using context. A component, later on, can access the store, even if it is deeply nested in the React tree.

Create the Search and Detail Components for Your React App

Before you get started building out the components, I’ll have you install a few more dependencies.

  • Redux gives you a global state. This can be helpful when you have deeply nested components that need to share the same state. Rather than passing unrelated properties down the component tree, you can simply access the Redux store.
  • Debugging can be much simpler.
    You can rewind the data to specific points to see the state of the app before or after any given action.It’s possible to log all actions a user took to get to a specific point (say an app crash, for example).Hot-reloading is more reliable if the state is stored outside the component itself.* Business logic can be moved into the Redux actions to separate business logic from components.

Install these with the following command:

yarn add bootstrap@4.2.1 react-bootstrap-typeahead@3.3.4 react-html-parser@2.0.2


Then, in src/index.js, you’ll need to add required CSS imports. You also will no longer need the default CSS from create-react-app. Replace this line:

import './index.css';


with the following two lines:

import 'bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css';
import 'react-bootstrap-typeahead/css/Typeahead.css';


Search Component

Create a new file src/Search.js containing the following:

import React, { useState } from 'react';
import { connect } from 'react-redux';
import { AsyncTypeahead } from 'react-bootstrap-typeahead';

import { searchShows, selectShow } from './actions';

const Search = ({ shows, fetchShows, selectShow, onChange }) => {
  const [value, setValue] = useState('');
  const options = (shows.search[value] || []).map(id => shows.detail[id]);

  return (
    <AsyncTypeahead
      autoFocus
      labelKey="name"
      filterBy={() => true}
      onSearch={term => {
        fetchShows(term);
        setValue(term);
      }}
      onChange={selectShow}
      placeholder="Search for a TV show..."
      isLoading={Boolean(value) && !shows.search[value]}
      options={options}
    />
  );
};

const mapStateToProps = state => ({
  shows: state.shows,
});

const mapDispatchToProps = dispatch => ({
  fetchShows: value => dispatch(searchShows(value)),
  selectShow: ([show]) => dispatch(selectShow(show && show.id)),
});

export default connect(
  mapStateToProps,
  mapDispatchToProps
)(Search);


React-Redux’s connect function is the glue that connects a component to the Redux store. It requires a mapStateToProps function that will transform the Redux state into properties that will be passed to your component. In this case, it is getting the shows subset of the store, which contains the detail, search, and selected you set up earlier.

The connect function also takes an optional mapDispatchToProps function, which allows your component to receive function properties that will dispatch actions. Here, you’re getting a function fetchShows to search for shows with the search term you pass in, and another function selectShow that will tell redux which show you’ve selected.

The AsyncTypeahead component from react-bootstrap-typeahead gives you a few hooks to trigger a search or select an option. If the user has started typing but the redux store doesn’t have any results yet (not even an empty array), then this adds a loading icon to the search box.

Detail Component

Next, to display the details of the selected show, create a new file src/Detail.js containing the following:

import React from 'react';
import ReactHtmlParser from 'react-html-parser';
import { connect } from 'react-redux';

const Detail = ({ show }) =>
  show ? (
    <div className="media">
      {show.image && (
        <img
          className="align-self-start mr-3"
          width={200}
          src={show.image.original}
          alt={show.name}
        />
      )}
      <div className="media-body">
        <h5 className="mt-0">
          {show.name}
          {show.network && <small className="ml-2">{show.network.name}</small>}
        </h5>
        {ReactHtmlParser(show.summary)}
      </div>
    </div>
  ) : (
    <div>Select a show to view detail</div>
  );

const mapStateToProps = ({ shows }) => ({
  show: shows.detail[shows.selected],
});

export default connect(mapStateToProps)(Detail);


If there is no show selected, you’ll get a simple message to select a show first. Since this is connected to the redux store, you can get the detail for a selected show with shows.detail[shows.selected], which will be undefined if there is no show selected. Once you’ve selected one, you’ll get the detail passed in as the show prop. In that case, you can show the artwork, name, network, and summary for the show. There’s a lot more information contained in the details, so you can display quite a bit more information if you want to play around with the detail page some more.

Add the Components to Your React App

Now that you’ve created the Search and Detail components, you can tie them into your app. Back in src/App.js, replace the placeholder App functional component (containing the TODO) with the following:

  <div className="m-3">
    <Search />
    <div className="my-3">
      <Detail />
    </div>
  </div>


You’ll also need to make sure to import those components at the top of the file:

import Search from './Search';
import Detail from './Detail';


For reference, here’s the full src/App.js file after these changes:

import React from 'react';

import { Provider } from 'react-redux';
import store from './store';

import Search from './Search';
import Detail from './Detail';

const App = () => (
  <div className="m-3">
    <Search />
    <div className="my-3">
      <Detail />
    </div>
  </div>
);

export default () => (
  <Provider store={store}>
    <App />
  </Provider>
);


Profit

You should now have a fully functional web app where you can search for TV shows and get some details.

If you install the Redux DevTools Extension you’ll also be able to replay actions, view the data in the store, and much more.

Add User Authentication To Your React Redux App

Okta is a cloud service that allows developers to create, edit, and securely store user accounts and user account data, and connect them with one or multiple applications. If you don’t already have one, sign up for a forever-free developer account. Log in to your developer console, navigate to Applications, then click Add Application. Select Single-Page App, then click Next.

Since Create React App runs on port 3000 by default, you should add that as a Base URI and Login Redirect URI. Your settings should look like the following:

Click Done to save your app, then copy your Client ID and paste it as a variable into a file called .env.local in the root of your project. This will allow you to access the file in your code without needing to store credentials in source control. You’ll also need to add your organization URL (without the -admin suffix). Environment variables (other than NODE_ENV) need to start with REACT_APP_ in order for Create React App to read them, so the file should end up looking like this:

REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL=https://{yourOktaDomain}
REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID={yourClientId}


You may need to restart your server before it will recognize these changes. You can find the running instance and then hit ctrl-c to close it. Then run it again with yarn start.

The easiest way to add Authentication with Okta to a React app is to use Okta’s React SDK. You’ll also need to add routes, which can be done using React Router. Go ahead and add these dependencies:

yarn add @okta/okta-react@1.1.4 react-router-dom@4.3.1


You’ll need to make some changes to src/App.js now. Here’s what the final output should be, but I’ll go over what the differences are:

import React, { useState, useEffect } from 'react';
import { BrowserRouter as Router, Route } from 'react-router-dom';
import { Security, ImplicitCallback, withAuth } from '@okta/okta-react';

import { Provider } from 'react-redux';
import store from './store';

import Search from './Search';
import Detail from './Detail';

const App = withAuth(({ auth }) => {
  const [authenticated, setAuthenticated] = useState(null);

  useEffect(() => {
    auth.isAuthenticated().then(isAuthenticated => {
      if (isAuthenticated !== authenticated) {
        setAuthenticated(isAuthenticated);
      }
    });
  });

  return (
    <div className="m-3">
      {authenticated ? (
        <>
          <div className="mb-3">
            <button className="btn btn-primary" onClick={() => auth.logout()}>
              Logout
            </button>
          </div>
          <Search />
          <div className="my-3">
            <Detail />
          </div>
        </>
      ) : authenticated === null ? (
        <h4>Loading...</h4>
      ) : (
        <button className="btn btn-primary" onClick={() => auth.login()}>
          Login to search TV Shows
        </button>
      )}
    </div>
  );
});

export default () => (
  <Provider store={store}>
    <Router>
      <Security
        issuer={`${process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL}/oauth2/default`}
        client_id={process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID}
        redirect_uri={`${window.location.origin}/implicit/callback`}
      >
        <Route path="/" exact component={App} />
        <Route path="/implicit/callback" component={ImplicitCallback} />
      </Security>
    </Router>
  </Provider>
);


The main App functional component now uses a piece of state to track whether or not a user is authenticated. Whenever the component renders, an effect checks whether or not authentication has changed. This makes sure that if a user logs in or out the component will properly update. Because it’s wrapped with Okta’s withAuth, it can now access the auth prop in order to check for authentication.

The main portion of the return statement in App now renders the same thing it previously did, but only if the user is authenticated. It also adds a Logout button in that case. If authenticated is null, that means Okta hasn’t yet told you whether or not you’re authenticated, so it just shows a simple “Loading” text. Finally, if you’re not authenticated, it just shows a login button that will redirect you to your Okta org to sign in.

The default export now wraps the app with React Router and Okta, as well as Redux. This now allows you to use withAuth to pull authentication information out of context. It also uses Okta and React Router to decide whether to render App or redirect you to log in or out.

#redux #reactjs

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Buddha Community

A Beginner's Guide to Redux
Tia  Gottlieb

Tia Gottlieb

1596336480

Beginners Guide to Machine Learning on GCP

Introduction to Machine Learning

  • Machine Learning is a way to use some set of algorithms to derive predictive analytics from data. It is different than Business Intelligence and Data Analytics in a sense that In BI and Data analytics Businesses make decision based on historical data, but In case of Machine Learning , Businesses predict the future based on the historical data. Example, It’s a difference between what happened to the business vs what will happen to the business.Its like making BI much smarter and scalable so that it can predict future rather than just showing the state of the business.
  • **ML is based on Standard algorithms which are used to create use case specific model based on the data **. For example we can build the model to predict delivery time of the food, or we can build the model to predict the Delinquency rate in Finance business , but to build these model algorithm might be similar but the training would be different.Model training requires tones of examples (data).
  • Basically you train your standard algorithm with your Input data. So algorithms are always same but trained models are different based on use cases. Your trained model will be as good as your data.

ML, AI , Deep learning ? What is the difference?

Image for post

ML is type of AI

AI is a discipline , Machine Learning is tool set to achieve AI. DL is type of ML when data is unstructured like image, speech , video etc.

Barrier to Entry Has Fallen

AI & ML was daunting and with high barrier to entry until cloud become more robust and natural AI platform. Entry barrier to AI & ML has fallen significantly due to

  • Increasing availability in data (big data).
  • Increase in sophistication in algorithm.
  • And availability of hardware and software due to cloud computing.

GCP Machine Learning Spectrum

Image for post

  • For Data scientist and ML experts , TensorFlow on AI platform is more natural choice since they will build their own custom ML models.
  • But for the users who are not experts will potentially use Cloud AutoML or Pre-trained ready to go model.
  • In case of AutoML we can trained our custom model with Google taking care of much of the operational tasks.
  • Pre-trained models are the one which are already trained with tones of data and ready to be used by users to predict on their test data.

Prebuilt ML Models (No ML Expertise Needed)

  • As discuss earlier , GCP has lot of Prebuilt models that are ready to use to solve common ML task . Such as image classification, Sentiment analysis.
  • Most of the businesses are having many unstructured data sources such as e-mail, logs, web pages, ppt, documents, chat, comments etc.( 90% or more as per various studies)
  • Now to process these unstructured data in the form of text, we should use Cloud Natural Language API.
  • Similarly For common ML problems in the form of speech, video, vision we should use respective Prebuilt models.

#ml-guide-on-gcp #ml-for-beginners-on-gcp #beginner-ml-guide-on-gcp #machine-learning #machine-learning-gcp #deep learning

Dipesh Malvia

Dipesh Malvia

1631789409

React Redux Toolkit with Project | Redux Middleware Thunk | React Redux Tutorial For Beginners - 2

React Redux Toolkit with Project | Redux Middleware Thunk | React Redux Tutorial For Beginners - 2

In this video we are going to learn about React - Redux using Redux toolkit by build a project movie rating application from scratch. This video course is specially if you are planning to learn React with Redux Toolkit State Management library as a beginner. We will build a movie rating application and along with that we will use Axios for API calls, React Router DOM for Routing and Node-SASS for our SCSS compile to CSS. 

We will continue to enhance the application we will see how we can convert a synchronous action creator into a asynchronous action creator using Redux Middleware Thunk. 

You will find the topics covered in the timestamp below. 

⭐️React Redux Toolkit with Project - Part 1 - https://youtu.be/EnIRyNT2PMI 

⭐️GitHub link for Reference - https://github.com/dmalvia/React_Redux_ToolKit_Movie_App 

⭐️OMDB API - https://www.omdbapi.com/ 

⭐️ Support my channel - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dipeshmalvia

 ***React Roadmap for Developers in 2021*** 

  • How to Learn React JS ? - https://youtu.be/06yVj8pcO5c 
  • React Fundamentals Project - https://youtu.be/QoJGKwo20is 
  • Learn React Redux with Project - https://youtu.be/0W6i5LYKCSI 
  • What is Redux ? - https://youtu.be/qNjNn9BCWCc 
  • Learn React Redux Thunk with Project - https://youtu.be/JDZRfLGNWdc 
  • Learn CSS GRID Tutorial - https://youtu.be/zs7JzkWixPo 

***Checkout these video to understand better*** 

  • JavaScript ES6 Arrow Functions - https://youtu.be/TgzVxiPdCDU 
  • JavaScript Higher Order Functions & Arrays Methods - https://youtu.be/m2_kagsc3_c 
  • JavaScript ES6 Destructuring - https://youtu.be/rpYg2M2lNAE 

🔥 Video contents... ENJOY 👇

  •  0:00:00 - Intro 
  • 0:00:24 - Application Demo 
  • 0:02:23 - Unacademy Promo 
  • 0:05:00 - Code Walkthrough Sync Action Creators 
  • 0:05:30 - Redux Middleware Thunk - Redux Toolkit 
  • 0:06:36 - Create Async Action Creator 
  • 0:08:57 - Create extraReducers 
  • 0:09:22 - Async Action Creator Lifecycle 
  • 0:13:41 - Async Action - Fetch Shows 
  • 0:15:53 - Add Shows to Movie Listing Component 
  • 0:18:57 - Add CSS Transition 
  • 0:20:13 - Navigation - Movie Detail Component 
  • 0:23:19 - Async Action - Fetch Movie Details 
  • 0:25:49 - useParams Hook 
  • 0:30:00 - Movie Detail Component with SCSS 
  • 0:42:10 - UseEffect Cleanup Function 
  • 0:43:00 - Sync Action - Remove Selected Movie/Show 
  • 0:45:04 - Conditional Movie Detail Loading 
  • 0:47:33 - Outro 

***More videos*** 

  • JSON Crash Course - https://youtu.be/6OhMbf2v_jI 
  • Asynchronous Vs Synchronous Programming - https://youtu.be/oesicy3CcXE 
  • Async JavaScript Callback - https://youtu.be/1zeuvEvw5uw 
  • Async JavaScript Promises Tutorial - https://youtu.be/JvV4Rz2PpzA 

***Checkout my crash courses for get started with web development*** 

  •  HTML5 Crash Course in 1 Hour - https://youtu.be/Aj3QFsmsagc 
  • CSS Crash Course in 1 Hour - https://youtu.be/nYsk_U_A_lc 
  • JavaScript Tutorial for Beginners - https://youtu.be/sptS-bgg8Ro

🔗 Social Medias 🔗 

  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/IMDmalvia 
  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/programmingwithdipesh 
  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dipeshmalvia 
  • LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dmalvia/ 

⭐️ Tags ⭐️ 

  • React Redux Toolkit 
  • React Redux Toolkit Tutorial 
  • React Redux Toolkit Crash course 
  • React Redux Toolkit Project
  •  React Redux For Beginners 

⭐️ Hashtags ⭐️ 

#React #Redux #Toolkit #Beginners#Tutorials 

Disclaimer: It doesn't feel good to have a disclaimer in every video but this is how the world is right now. All videos are for educational purpose and use them wisely. Any video may have a slight mistake, please take decisions based on your research. This video is not forcing anything on you.

Dipesh Malvia

Dipesh Malvia

1631183395

React Redux Toolkit with Project | Redux Axios Tutorial | React Redux Tutorial For Beginners - 1

React Redux Toolkit with Project | Redux Axios Tutorial | React Redux Tutorial For Beginners - 1

In this video we are going to learn about React - Redux using Redux toolkit by build a project movie rating application from scratch. This video course is specially if you are planning to learn React with Redux Toolkit State Management library as a beginner. We will build a movie rating application and along with that we will use Axios for API calls, React Router DOM for Routing and Node-SASS for our SCSS compile to CSS. You will find the topics covered in the timestamp below.

⭐️GitHub link for Reference - https://github.com/dmalvia/React_Redux_ToolKit_Movie_App 

⭐️OMDB API - https://www.omdbapi.com/ 

⭐️ Support my channel - https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dipeshmalvia

🔥 Video contents... ENJOY 👇 

  • 0:00:00 - Intro 
  • 0:00:24 - Application Demo 
  • 0:02:23 - Unacademy Promo 
  • 0:04:48 - Code Walkthrough 
  • 0:07:54 - Installed Packages 
  • 0:08:32 - Movie Application Structure 
  • 0:09:54 - Creating Folder Structure and Files 
  • 0:14:10 - Adding functional component snippets 
  • 0:15:50 - OMDB API Key and usage 
  • 0:18:14 - Add Routing to Project 
  • 0:22:18 - Header Component with SCSS 
  • 0:27:49 - Adding common CSS to App.SCSS 
  • 0:29:41 - Footer Component with SCSS 
  • 0:31:36 - Home Component with SCSS 
  • 0:32:51 - Use Axios for API Call 
  • 0:37:44 - Adding Redux to Project 
  • 0:38:10 - Configure Redux Store 
  • 0:39:22 - Provide Store to App Component 
  • 0:40:30 - Redux Toolkit documentation walkthrough 
  • 0:42:28 - Create a Movie Slice 
  • 0:48:40 - useDispatch to dispatch action 
  • 0:51:10 - useSelector to access state 
  • 0:53:04 - Movie Listing Component with SCSS 
  • 0:58:22 - Movie Card Component with SCSS 
  • 1:05:29 - Outro 

***React Roadmap for Developers in 2021*** 

  • How to Learn React JS ? - https://youtu.be/06yVj8pcO5c 
  • React Fundamentals Project - https://youtu.be/QoJGKwo20is 
  • Learn React Redux with Project - https://youtu.be/0W6i5LYKCSI 
  • What is Redux ? - https://youtu.be/qNjNn9BCWCc 
  • Learn React Redux Thunk with Project - https://youtu.be/JDZRfLGNWdc 
  • Learn CSS GRID Tutorial - https://youtu.be/zs7JzkWixPo

🔗 Social Medias 🔗 

  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/IMDmalvia 
  • Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/programmingwithdipesh 
  • Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dipeshmalvia 
  • LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dmalvia/ 

⭐️ Tags ⭐️ 

  • React Redux Toolkit 
  • React Redux Toolkit Tutorial 
  • React Redux Toolkit Crash course 
  • React Redux Toolkit Project
  • React Redux For Beginners 

⭐️ Hashtags ⭐️ 

#React #Redux #Toolkit #Beginners#Tutorials 

Disclaimer: It doesn't feel good to have a disclaimer in every video but this is how the world is right now. All videos are for educational purpose and use them wisely. Any video may have a slight mistake, please take decisions based on your research. This video is not forcing anything on you.
 

https://youtu.be/EnIRyNT2PMI

Abigail betty

Abigail betty

1624226400

What is Bitcoin Cash? - A Beginner’s Guide

Bitcoin Cash was created as a result of a hard fork in the Bitcoin network. The Bitcoin Cash network supports a larger block size than Bitcoin (currently 32mb as opposed to Bitcoin’s 1mb).

Later on, Bitcoin Cash forked into Bitcoin SV due to differences in how to carry on its developments.

That’s Bitcoin Cash in a nutshell. If you want a more detailed review watch the complete video. Here’s what I’ll cover:

0:50 - Bitcoin forks
2:06 - Bitcoin’s block size debate
3:35 - Big blocks camp
4:26 - Small blocks camp
5:16 - Small blocks vs. big blocks arguments
7:05 - How decisions are made in the Bitcoin network
10:14 - Block size debate resolution
11:06 - Bitcoin cash intro
11:28 - BTC vs. BCH
12:13 - Bitcoin Cash (ABC) vs. Bitcoin SV
13:09 - Conclusion
📺 The video in this post was made by 99Bitcoins
The origin of the article: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONhbb4YVRLM
🔺 DISCLAIMER: The article is for information sharing. The content of this video is solely the opinions of the speaker who is not a licensed financial advisor or registered investment advisor. Not investment advice or legal advice.
Cryptocurrency trading is VERY risky. Make sure you understand these risks and that you are responsible for what you do with your money
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Thanks for visiting and watching! Please don’t forget to leave a like, comment and share!

#bitcoin #blockchain #bitcoin cash #what is bitcoin cash? - a beginner’s guide #what is bitcoin cash #a beginner’s guide

A Beginner’s Guide to Setting Up a Web Application with Typescript and Express

Web applications are types of software applications that run on remote servers (source). Examples of web applications can range from word processors, to file scanners, video editing tools, shopping carts, and more. Web applications can be great additions to any website; they can even function as websites themselves (Facebook, Gmail, and Udacity’s classroom are all examples of popular web applications), so understanding how to set up and implement a web application is a fantastic skill to have.

For this guide, I am assuming that you already have a basic knowledge of npmnode and whatExpress Requests and Responses are (or that you at least know what they are used for in their basic sense). Also, I assume that you know what the npm install and mkdir commands do. You have to know basic Typescript to implement — or at least know basic JavaScript to read and understand — the code below. Finally, this is the base for the backend of a web application. You still need to create a frontend application using a framework like Angular or an HTML/CSS file to make requests and display responses.

Before you start, it’s important that you create a folder in your favorite place on your computer. This can be anywhere as long as you have a sense of how you are going to find it later when you come up with an awesome project to start developing.

The Process:

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#web-development #backend #software-development #beginners-guide #beginner