How to Create a Custom Color Picker Using HTML, CSS & JavaScript

In today's video we'll be creating a custom color picker using HTML, CSS, JavaScript and the awesome colorpicker library. Once we've built the app, I'll show you how to deploy it to a live website using Hostinger.

Use code "DCODE" with Hostinger at the link below:
https://hostinger.com/dcode 

View the SOURCE CODE here:
https://github.com/dcode-youtube/color-picker-with-local-storage 

colorjoe library:
https://github.com/bebraw/colorjoe 

Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/dcode-software/featured 

 #javascript 

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How to Create a Custom Color Picker Using HTML, CSS & JavaScript
Easter  Deckow

Easter Deckow

1655630160

PyTumblr: A Python Tumblr API v2 Client

PyTumblr

Installation

Install via pip:

$ pip install pytumblr

Install from source:

$ git clone https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr.git
$ cd pytumblr
$ python setup.py install

Usage

Create a client

A pytumblr.TumblrRestClient is the object you'll make all of your calls to the Tumblr API through. Creating one is this easy:

client = pytumblr.TumblrRestClient(
    '<consumer_key>',
    '<consumer_secret>',
    '<oauth_token>',
    '<oauth_secret>',
)

client.info() # Grabs the current user information

Two easy ways to get your credentials to are:

  1. The built-in interactive_console.py tool (if you already have a consumer key & secret)
  2. The Tumblr API console at https://api.tumblr.com/console
  3. Get sample login code at https://api.tumblr.com/console/calls/user/info

Supported Methods

User Methods

client.info() # get information about the authenticating user
client.dashboard() # get the dashboard for the authenticating user
client.likes() # get the likes for the authenticating user
client.following() # get the blogs followed by the authenticating user

client.follow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # follow a blog
client.unfollow('codingjester.tumblr.com') # unfollow a blog

client.like(id, reblogkey) # like a post
client.unlike(id, reblogkey) # unlike a post

Blog Methods

client.blog_info(blogName) # get information about a blog
client.posts(blogName, **params) # get posts for a blog
client.avatar(blogName) # get the avatar for a blog
client.blog_likes(blogName) # get the likes on a blog
client.followers(blogName) # get the followers of a blog
client.blog_following(blogName) # get the publicly exposed blogs that [blogName] follows
client.queue(blogName) # get the queue for a given blog
client.submission(blogName) # get the submissions for a given blog

Post Methods

Creating posts

PyTumblr lets you create all of the various types that Tumblr supports. When using these types there are a few defaults that are able to be used with any post type.

The default supported types are described below.

  • state - a string, the state of the post. Supported types are published, draft, queue, private
  • tags - a list, a list of strings that you want tagged on the post. eg: ["testing", "magic", "1"]
  • tweet - a string, the string of the customized tweet you want. eg: "Man I love my mega awesome post!"
  • date - a string, the customized GMT that you want
  • format - a string, the format that your post is in. Support types are html or markdown
  • slug - a string, the slug for the url of the post you want

We'll show examples throughout of these default examples while showcasing all the specific post types.

Creating a photo post

Creating a photo post supports a bunch of different options plus the described default options * caption - a string, the user supplied caption * link - a string, the "click-through" url for the photo * source - a string, the url for the photo you want to use (use this or the data parameter) * data - a list or string, a list of filepaths or a single file path for multipart file upload

#Creates a photo post using a source URL
client.create_photo(blogName, state="published", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    source="https://68.media.tumblr.com/b965fbb2e501610a29d80ffb6fb3e1ad/tumblr_n55vdeTse11rn1906o1_500.jpg")

#Creates a photo post using a local filepath
client.create_photo(blogName, state="queue", tags=["testing", "ok"],
                    tweet="Woah this is an incredible sweet post [URL]",
                    data="/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg")

#Creates a photoset post using several local filepaths
client.create_photo(blogName, state="draft", tags=["jb is cool"], format="markdown",
                    data=["/Users/johnb/path/to/my/image.jpg", "/Users/johnb/Pictures/kittens.jpg"],
                    caption="## Mega sweet kittens")

Creating a text post

Creating a text post supports the same options as default and just a two other parameters * title - a string, the optional title for the post. Supports markdown or html * body - a string, the body of the of the post. Supports markdown or html

#Creating a text post
client.create_text(blogName, state="published", slug="testing-text-posts", title="Testing", body="testing1 2 3 4")

Creating a quote post

Creating a quote post supports the same options as default and two other parameter * quote - a string, the full text of the qote. Supports markdown or html * source - a string, the cited source. HTML supported

#Creating a quote post
client.create_quote(blogName, state="queue", quote="I am the Walrus", source="Ringo")

Creating a link post

  • title - a string, the title of post that you want. Supports HTML entities.
  • url - a string, the url that you want to create a link post for.
  • description - a string, the desciption of the link that you have
#Create a link post
client.create_link(blogName, title="I like to search things, you should too.", url="https://duckduckgo.com",
                   description="Search is pretty cool when a duck does it.")

Creating a chat post

Creating a chat post supports the same options as default and two other parameters * title - a string, the title of the chat post * conversation - a string, the text of the conversation/chat, with diablog labels (no html)

#Create a chat post
chat = """John: Testing can be fun!
Renee: Testing is tedious and so are you.
John: Aw.
"""
client.create_chat(blogName, title="Renee just doesn't understand.", conversation=chat, tags=["renee", "testing"])

Creating an audio post

Creating an audio post allows for all default options and a has 3 other parameters. The only thing to keep in mind while dealing with audio posts is to make sure that you use the external_url parameter or data. You cannot use both at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * external_url - a string, the url of the site that hosts the audio file * data - a string, the filepath of the audio file you want to upload to Tumblr

#Creating an audio file
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Rock out.", data="/Users/johnb/Music/my/new/sweet/album.mp3")

#lets use soundcloud!
client.create_audio(blogName, caption="Mega rock out.", external_url="https://soundcloud.com/skrillex/sets/recess")

Creating a video post

Creating a video post allows for all default options and has three other options. Like the other post types, it has some restrictions. You cannot use the embed and data parameters at the same time. * caption - a string, the caption for your post * embed - a string, the HTML embed code for the video * data - a string, the path of the file you want to upload

#Creating an upload from YouTube
client.create_video(blogName, caption="Jon Snow. Mega ridiculous sword.",
                    embed="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40pUYLacrj4")

#Creating a video post from local file
client.create_video(blogName, caption="testing", data="/Users/johnb/testing/ok/blah.mov")

Editing a post

Updating a post requires you knowing what type a post you're updating. You'll be able to supply to the post any of the options given above for updates.

client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="text", title="Updated")
client.edit_post(blogName, id=post_id, type="photo", data="/Users/johnb/mega/awesome.jpg")

Reblogging a Post

Reblogging a post just requires knowing the post id and the reblog key, which is supplied in the JSON of any post object.

client.reblog(blogName, id=125356, reblog_key="reblog_key")

Deleting a post

Deleting just requires that you own the post and have the post id

client.delete_post(blogName, 123456) # Deletes your post :(

A note on tags: When passing tags, as params, please pass them as a list (not a comma-separated string):

client.create_text(blogName, tags=['hello', 'world'], ...)

Getting notes for a post

In order to get the notes for a post, you need to have the post id and the blog that it is on.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456')

The results include a timestamp you can use to make future calls.

data = client.notes(blogName, id='123456', before_timestamp=data["_links"]["next"]["query_params"]["before_timestamp"])

Tagged Methods

# get posts with a given tag
client.tagged(tag, **params)

Using the interactive console

This client comes with a nice interactive console to run you through the OAuth process, grab your tokens (and store them for future use).

You'll need pyyaml installed to run it, but then it's just:

$ python interactive-console.py

and away you go! Tokens are stored in ~/.tumblr and are also shared by other Tumblr API clients like the Ruby client.

Running tests

The tests (and coverage reports) are run with nose, like this:

python setup.py test

Author: tumblr
Source Code: https://github.com/tumblr/pytumblr
License: Apache-2.0 license

#python #api 

Flutter Dev

Flutter Dev

1679035563

How to Add Splash Screen in Android and iOS with Flutter

When your app is opened, there is a brief time while the native app loads Flutter. By default, during this time, the native app displays a white splash screen. This package automatically generates iOS, Android, and Web-native code for customizing this native splash screen background color and splash image. Supports dark mode, full screen, and platform-specific options.

What's New

[BETA] Support for flavors is in beta. Currently only Android and iOS are supported. See instructions below.

You can now keep the splash screen up while your app initializes! No need for a secondary splash screen anymore. Just use the preserve and remove methods together to remove the splash screen after your initialization is complete. See details below.

Usage

Would you prefer a video tutorial instead? Check out Johannes Milke's tutorial.

First, add flutter_native_splash as a dependency in your pubspec.yaml file.

dependencies:
  flutter_native_splash: ^2.2.19

Don't forget to flutter pub get.

1. Setting the splash screen

 

Customize the following settings and add to your project's pubspec.yaml file or place in a new file in your root project folder named flutter_native_splash.yaml.

flutter_native_splash:
  # This package generates native code to customize Flutter's default white native splash screen
  # with background color and splash image.
  # Customize the parameters below, and run the following command in the terminal:
  # flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create
  # To restore Flutter's default white splash screen, run the following command in the terminal:
  # flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:remove

  # color or background_image is the only required parameter.  Use color to set the background
  # of your splash screen to a solid color.  Use background_image to set the background of your
  # splash screen to a png image.  This is useful for gradients. The image will be stretch to the
  # size of the app. Only one parameter can be used, color and background_image cannot both be set.
  color: "#42a5f5"
  #background_image: "assets/background.png"

  # Optional parameters are listed below.  To enable a parameter, uncomment the line by removing
  # the leading # character.

  # The image parameter allows you to specify an image used in the splash screen.  It must be a
  # png file and should be sized for 4x pixel density.
  #image: assets/splash.png

  # The branding property allows you to specify an image used as branding in the splash screen.
  # It must be a png file. It is supported for Android, iOS and the Web.  For Android 12,
  # see the Android 12 section below.
  #branding: assets/dart.png

  # To position the branding image at the bottom of the screen you can use bottom, bottomRight,
  # and bottomLeft. The default values is bottom if not specified or specified something else.
  #branding_mode: bottom

  # The color_dark, background_image_dark, image_dark, branding_dark are parameters that set the background
  # and image when the device is in dark mode. If they are not specified, the app will use the
  # parameters from above. If the image_dark parameter is specified, color_dark or
  # background_image_dark must be specified.  color_dark and background_image_dark cannot both be
  # set.
  #color_dark: "#042a49"
  #background_image_dark: "assets/dark-background.png"
  #image_dark: assets/splash-invert.png
  #branding_dark: assets/dart_dark.png

  # Android 12 handles the splash screen differently than previous versions.  Please visit
  # https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/ui/splash-screen
  # Following are Android 12 specific parameter.
  android_12:
    # The image parameter sets the splash screen icon image.  If this parameter is not specified,
    # the app's launcher icon will be used instead.
    # Please note that the splash screen will be clipped to a circle on the center of the screen.
    # App icon with an icon background: This should be 960×960 pixels, and fit within a circle
    # 640 pixels in diameter.
    # App icon without an icon background: This should be 1152×1152 pixels, and fit within a circle
    # 768 pixels in diameter.
    #image: assets/android12splash.png

    # Splash screen background color.
    #color: "#42a5f5"

    # App icon background color.
    #icon_background_color: "#111111"

    # The branding property allows you to specify an image used as branding in the splash screen.
    #branding: assets/dart.png

    # The image_dark, color_dark, icon_background_color_dark, and branding_dark set values that
    # apply when the device is in dark mode. If they are not specified, the app will use the
    # parameters from above.
    #image_dark: assets/android12splash-invert.png
    #color_dark: "#042a49"
    #icon_background_color_dark: "#eeeeee"

  # The android, ios and web parameters can be used to disable generating a splash screen on a given
  # platform.
  #android: false
  #ios: false
  #web: false

  # Platform specific images can be specified with the following parameters, which will override
  # the respective parameter.  You may specify all, selected, or none of these parameters:
  #color_android: "#42a5f5"
  #color_dark_android: "#042a49"
  #color_ios: "#42a5f5"
  #color_dark_ios: "#042a49"
  #color_web: "#42a5f5"
  #color_dark_web: "#042a49"
  #image_android: assets/splash-android.png
  #image_dark_android: assets/splash-invert-android.png
  #image_ios: assets/splash-ios.png
  #image_dark_ios: assets/splash-invert-ios.png
  #image_web: assets/splash-web.png
  #image_dark_web: assets/splash-invert-web.png
  #background_image_android: "assets/background-android.png"
  #background_image_dark_android: "assets/dark-background-android.png"
  #background_image_ios: "assets/background-ios.png"
  #background_image_dark_ios: "assets/dark-background-ios.png"
  #background_image_web: "assets/background-web.png"
  #background_image_dark_web: "assets/dark-background-web.png"
  #branding_android: assets/brand-android.png
  #branding_dark_android: assets/dart_dark-android.png
  #branding_ios: assets/brand-ios.png
  #branding_dark_ios: assets/dart_dark-ios.png

  # The position of the splash image can be set with android_gravity, ios_content_mode, and
  # web_image_mode parameters.  All default to center.
  #
  # android_gravity can be one of the following Android Gravity (see
  # https://developer.android.com/reference/android/view/Gravity): bottom, center,
  # center_horizontal, center_vertical, clip_horizontal, clip_vertical, end, fill, fill_horizontal,
  # fill_vertical, left, right, start, or top.
  #android_gravity: center
  #
  # ios_content_mode can be one of the following iOS UIView.ContentMode (see
  # https://developer.apple.com/documentation/uikit/uiview/contentmode): scaleToFill,
  # scaleAspectFit, scaleAspectFill, center, top, bottom, left, right, topLeft, topRight,
  # bottomLeft, or bottomRight.
  #ios_content_mode: center
  #
  # web_image_mode can be one of the following modes: center, contain, stretch, and cover.
  #web_image_mode: center

  # The screen orientation can be set in Android with the android_screen_orientation parameter.
  # Valid parameters can be found here:
  # https://developer.android.com/guide/topics/manifest/activity-element#screen
  #android_screen_orientation: sensorLandscape

  # To hide the notification bar, use the fullscreen parameter.  Has no effect in web since web
  # has no notification bar.  Defaults to false.
  # NOTE: Unlike Android, iOS will not automatically show the notification bar when the app loads.
  #       To show the notification bar, add the following code to your Flutter app:
  #       WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();
  #       SystemChrome.setEnabledSystemUIOverlays([SystemUiOverlay.bottom, SystemUiOverlay.top]);
  #fullscreen: true

  # If you have changed the name(s) of your info.plist file(s), you can specify the filename(s)
  # with the info_plist_files parameter.  Remove only the # characters in the three lines below,
  # do not remove any spaces:
  #info_plist_files:
  #  - 'ios/Runner/Info-Debug.plist'
  #  - 'ios/Runner/Info-Release.plist'

2. Run the package

After adding your settings, run the following command in the terminal:

flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create

When the package finishes running, your splash screen is ready.

To specify the YAML file location just add --path with the command in the terminal:

flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create --path=path/to/my/file.yaml

3. Set up app initialization (optional)

By default, the splash screen will be removed when Flutter has drawn the first frame. If you would like the splash screen to remain while your app initializes, you can use the preserve() and remove() methods together. Pass the preserve() method the value returned from WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized() to keep the splash on screen. Later, when your app has initialized, make a call to remove() to remove the splash screen.

import 'package:flutter_native_splash/flutter_native_splash.dart';

void main() {
  WidgetsBinding widgetsBinding = WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();
  FlutterNativeSplash.preserve(widgetsBinding: widgetsBinding);
  runApp(const MyApp());
}

// whenever your initialization is completed, remove the splash screen:
    FlutterNativeSplash.remove();

NOTE: If you do not need to use the preserve() and remove() methods, you can place the flutter_native_splash dependency in the dev_dependencies section of pubspec.yaml.

4. Support the package (optional)

If you find this package useful, you can support it for free by giving it a thumbs up at the top of this page. Here's another option to support the package:

Android 12+ Support

Android 12 has a new method of adding splash screens, which consists of a window background, icon, and the icon background. Note that a background image is not supported.

Be aware of the following considerations regarding these elements:

1: image parameter. By default, the launcher icon is used:

  • App icon without an icon background, as shown on the left: This should be 1152×1152 pixels, and fit within a circle 768 pixels in diameter.
  • App icon with an icon background, as shown on the right: This should be 960×960 pixels, and fit within a circle 640 pixels in diameter.

2: icon_background_color is optional, and is useful if you need more contrast between the icon and the window background.

3: One-third of the foreground is masked.

4: color the window background consists of a single opaque color.

PLEASE NOTE: The splash screen may not appear when you launch the app from Android Studio on API 31. However, it should appear when you launch by clicking on the launch icon in Android. This seems to be resolved in API 32+.

PLEASE NOTE: There are a number of reports that non-Google launchers do not display the launch image correctly. If the launch image does not display correctly, please try the Google launcher to confirm that this package is working.

PLEASE NOTE: The splash screen does not appear when you launch the app from a notification. Apparently this is the intended behavior on Android 12: core-splashscreen Icon not shown when cold launched from notification.

Flavor Support

If you have a project setup that contains multiple flavors or environments, and you created more than one flavor this would be a feature for you.

Instead of maintaining multiple files and copy/pasting images, you can now, using this tool, create different splash screens for different environments.

Pre-requirements

In order to use the new feature, and generate the desired splash images for you app, a couple of changes are required.

If you want to generate just one flavor and one file you would use either options as described in Step 1. But in order to setup the flavors, you will then be required to move all your setup values to the flutter_native_splash.yaml file, but with a prefix.

Let's assume for the rest of the setup that you have 3 different flavors, Production, Acceptance, Development.

First this you will need to do is to create a different setup file for all 3 flavors with a suffix like so:

flutter_native_splash-production.yaml
flutter_native_splash-acceptance.yaml
flutter_native_splash-development.yaml

You would setup those 3 files the same way as you would the one, but with different assets depending on which environment you would be generating. For example (Note: these are just examples, you can use whatever setup you need for your project that is already supported by the package):

# flutter_native_splash-development.yaml
flutter_native_splash:
  color: "#ffffff"
  image: assets/logo-development.png
  branding: assets/branding-development.png
  color_dark: "#121212"
  image_dark: assets/logo-development.png
  branding_dark: assets/branding-development.png

  android_12:
    image: assets/logo-development.png
    icon_background_color: "#ffffff"
    image_dark: assets/logo-development.png
    icon_background_color_dark: "#121212"

  web: false

# flutter_native_splash-acceptance.yaml
flutter_native_splash:
  color: "#ffffff"
  image: assets/logo-acceptance.png
  branding: assets/branding-acceptance.png
  color_dark: "#121212"
  image_dark: assets/logo-acceptance.png
  branding_dark: assets/branding-acceptance.png

  android_12:
    image: assets/logo-acceptance.png
    icon_background_color: "#ffffff"
    image_dark: assets/logo-acceptance.png
    icon_background_color_dark: "#121212"

  web: false

# flutter_native_splash-production.yaml
flutter_native_splash:
  color: "#ffffff"
  image: assets/logo-production.png
  branding: assets/branding-production.png
  color_dark: "#121212"
  image_dark: assets/logo-production.png
  branding_dark: assets/branding-production.png

  android_12:
    image: assets/logo-production.png
    icon_background_color: "#ffffff"
    image_dark: assets/logo-production.png
    icon_background_color_dark: "#121212"

  web: false

Great, now comes the fun part running the new command!

The new command is:

# If you have a flavor called production you would do this:
flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create --flavor production

# For a flavor with a name staging you would provide it's name like so:
flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create --flavor staging

# And if you have a local version for devs you could do that:
flutter pub run flutter_native_splash:create --flavor development

Android setup

You're done! No, really, Android doesn't need any additional setup.

Note: If it didn't work, please make sure that your flavors are named the same as your config files, otherwise the setup will not work.

iOS setup

iOS is a bit tricky, so hang tight, it might look scary but most of the steps are just a single click, explained as much as possible to lower the possibility of mistakes.

When you run the new command, you will need to open xCode and follow the steps bellow:

Assumption

  • In order for this setup to work, you would already have 3 different schemes setup; production, acceptance and development.

Preparation

  • Open the iOS Flutter project in Xcode (open the Runner.xcworkspace)
  • Find the newly created Storyboard files at the same location where the original is {project root}/ios/Runner/Base.lproj
  • Select all of them and drag and drop into Xcode, directly to the left hand side where the current LaunchScreen.storyboard is located already
  • After you drop your files there Xcode will ask you to link them, make sure you select 'Copy if needed'
  • This part is done, you have linked the newly created storyboards in your project.

xCode

Xcode still doesn't know how to use them, so we need to specify for all the current flavors (schemes) which file to use and to use that value inside the Info.plist file.

  • Open the iOS Flutter project in Xcode (open the Runner.xcworkspace)
  • Click the Runner project in the top left corner (usually the first item in the list)
  • In the middle part of the screen, on the left side, select the Runner target
  • On the top part of the screen select Build Settings
  • Make sure that 'All' and 'Combined' are selected
  • Next to 'Combine' you have a '+' button, press it and select 'Add User-Defined Setting'
  • Once you do that Xcode will create a new variable for you to name. Suggestion is to name it LAUNCH_SCREEN_STORYBOARD
  • Once you do that, you will have the option to define a specific name for each flavor (scheme) that you have defined in the project. Make sure that you input the exact name of the LaunchScreen.storyboard that was created by this tool
    • Example: If you have a flavor Development, there is a Storyboard created name LaunchScreenDevelopment.storyboard, please add that name (without the storyboard part) to the variable value next to the flavor value
  • After you finish with that, you need to update Info.plist file to link the newly created variable so that it's used correctly
  • Open the Info.plist file
  • Find the entry called 'Launch screen interface file base name'
  • The default value is 'LaunchScreen', change that to the variable name that you create previously. If you follow these steps exactly, it would be LAUNCH_SCREEN_STORYBOARD, so input this $(LAUNCH_SCREEN_STORYBOARD)
  • And your done!

Congrats you finished your setup for multiple flavors,

FAQs

I got the error "A splash screen was provided to Flutter, but this is deprecated."

This message is not related to this package but is related to a change in how Flutter handles splash screens in Flutter 2.5. It is caused by having the following code in your android/app/src/main/AndroidManifest.xml, which was included by default in previous versions of Flutter:

<meta-data
 android:name="io.flutter.embedding.android.SplashScreenDrawable"
 android:resource="@drawable/launch_background"
 />

The solution is to remove the above code. Note that this will also remove the fade effect between the native splash screen and your app.

Are animations/lottie/GIF images supported?

Not at this time. PRs are always welcome!

I got the error AAPT: error: style attribute 'android:attr/windowSplashScreenBackground' not found

This attribute is only found in Android 12, so if you are getting this error, it means your project is not fully set up for Android 12. Did you update your app's build configuration?

I see a flash of the wrong splash screen on iOS

This is caused by an iOS splash caching bug, which can be solved by uninstalling your app, powering off your device, power back on, and then try reinstalling.

I see a white screen between splash screen and app

  1. It may be caused by an iOS splash caching bug, which can be solved by uninstalling your app, powering off your device, power back on, and then try reinstalling.
  2. It may be caused by the delay due to initialization in your app. To solve this, put any initialization code in the removeAfter method.

Can I base light/dark mode on app settings?

No. This package creates a splash screen that is displayed before Flutter is loaded. Because of this, when the splash screen loads, internal app settings are not available to the splash screen. Unfortunately, this means that it is impossible to control light/dark settings of the splash from app settings.

Notes

If the splash screen was not updated correctly on iOS or if you experience a white screen before the splash screen, run flutter clean and recompile your app. If that does not solve the problem, delete your app, power down the device, power up the device, install and launch the app as per this StackOverflow thread.

This package modifies launch_background.xml and styles.xml files on Android, LaunchScreen.storyboard and Info.plist on iOS, and index.html on Web. If you have modified these files manually, this plugin may not work properly. Please open an issue if you find any bugs.

How it works

Android

  • Your splash image will be resized to mdpi, hdpi, xhdpi, xxhdpi and xxxhdpi drawables.
  • An <item> tag containing a <bitmap> for your splash image drawable will be added in launch_background.xml
  • Background color will be added in colors.xml and referenced in launch_background.xml.
  • Code for full screen mode toggle will be added in styles.xml.
  • Dark mode variants are placed in drawable-night, values-night, etc. resource folders.

iOS

  • Your splash image will be resized to @3x and @2x images.
  • Color and image properties will be inserted in LaunchScreen.storyboard.
  • The background color is implemented by using a single-pixel png file and stretching it to fit the screen.
  • Code for hidden status bar toggle will be added in Info.plist.

Web

  • A web/splash folder will be created for splash screen images and CSS files.
  • Your splash image will be resized to 1x, 2x, 3x, and 4x sizes and placed in web/splash/img.
  • The splash style sheet will be added to the app's web/index.html, as well as the HTML for the splash pictures.

Acknowledgments

This package was originally created by Henrique Arthur and it is currently maintained by Jon Hanson.

Bugs or Requests

If you encounter any problems feel free to open an issue. If you feel the library is missing a feature, please raise a ticket. Pull request are also welcome.


Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add flutter_native_splash

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  flutter_native_splash: ^2.2.19

Alternatively, your editor might support flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:flutter_native_splash/flutter_native_splash.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:flutter_native_splash/flutter_native_splash.dart';

void main() {
  WidgetsBinding widgetsBinding = WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();
  FlutterNativeSplash.preserve(widgetsBinding: widgetsBinding);
  runApp(const MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  const MyApp({super.key});

  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
      ),
      home: const MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  const MyHomePage({super.key, required this.title});

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  State<MyHomePage> createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  void initState() {
    super.initState();
    initialization();
  }

  void initialization() async {
    // This is where you can initialize the resources needed by your app while
    // the splash screen is displayed.  Remove the following example because
    // delaying the user experience is a bad design practice!
    // ignore_for_file: avoid_print
    print('ready in 3...');
    await Future.delayed(const Duration(seconds: 1));
    print('ready in 2...');
    await Future.delayed(const Duration(seconds: 1));
    print('ready in 1...');
    await Future.delayed(const Duration(seconds: 1));
    print('go!');
    FlutterNativeSplash.remove();
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            const Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headlineMedium,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: const Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Download Details:
 

Author: jonbhanson
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/jonbhanson/flutter_native_splash 
License: MIT license

#flutter #ios #android 

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Web Monster

Web Monster

1677108125

Creating a Responsive Blog with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript

Are you looking to build a professional-looking blog with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript? In this video 

tutorial, we'll walk you through the process of designing and developing a blog from scratch, step-by-step. 

 

From creating the layout of your blog with HTML and CSS to adding interactivity and functionality with JavaScript, 

we'll cover everything you need to know to create a fully functional blog. Whether you're a blogger, 

web developer, or simply looking to learn new skills, this tutorial is for you! 

We'll also provide some tips and tricks along the way to help you optimize your blog for search engines, improve your website's accessibility, and enhance the user experience. 

🔔 Subscribe for more! 

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHI9Mo7HCSlqum1UMP2APFQ

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

🔗 Source code 

https://upfiles.com/KO0VqqK

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

☝ Start developing the project (base files + images) 

- Click on the UpFiles link 

- Click the green button (code) 

- Click Download ZIP 

- Extract the project to the desired location 

📂Assets 

Icons: https://boxicon.com/

 Fonts: https://fonts.google.com/

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

 ðŸ”¥ Follow me! 

Facebook 

https://bit.ly/3IMfk04

 Instagram 

https://bit.ly/3GHoQyT

 Twitter 

https://bit.ly/3IOBEqc

 Linkedin 

https://bit.ly/3INnwNY

 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Tags: 

#responsiveportfolio #portfoliohtmlcssjs #webmonster #html #css #javascript #webdesign #website #react #blog, #HTML #CSS #JavaScript #web_development #responsive_design #accessibility #user_experience #tutorial. 

 

So, if you're ready to start building your own blog, this video is the perfect place to start. Be sure to like this video and subscribe to our channel for more web development tutorials and tips!

 

Link of The Video :

https://youtu.be/BqgWIel4uuU

Saurabh Kumar

Saurabh Kumar

1671267560

Personal Portfolio Website Using Html Css and Javascript

#HTML #CSS #JavaScript 

In this tutorial we are going to make a personal Portfolio in this website there are six section Home, About, Services,Portfolio , Skills, and Contact the main features of this is dark/light mode function

 âˆŽ Download Source codes - https://www.thesimplifieddev.com/make-a-personal-portfolio-website

Features : -

  • Fully Responsive 
  • Dark mode/light mode
  • Browser compatibility
  • Social Media Icon
  • and many more

#css  #html  #javascript