CATG: A Concolic Testing Engine for Java

CATG

CATG is a concolic unit testing engine for Java programs. The implementation uses ASM for instrumentation. ASM instrumentation instruments (see janala.instrument.) class files at runtime and dumps (see janala.logger.) to a file a log of all instructions executed by the program and all values loaded from local stacks and heaps. A concolic execution engine (see janala.interpreters.*) then takes the log and performs both symbolic and concrete interpretation of the logged instructions.

You must have java, gradle, cvc4 (http://cvc4.cs.nyu.edu/downloads/), and python 2.7 in your PATH. Two extra jar files are needed to run the tool. Create a lib directory in the root directory and download the following jar files

place them in the lib directory. Then invoke

gradle build

and

gradle integrationTest

To run the the full integration tests, use

./setup.sh  # This builds CATG and copy it to lib/
python testall.py

To run tests and see coverage report, use

gradle build
gradle jacocoTestReport

This runs the tests using online concolic execution. To run tests with offline concolic execution, use

python --offline testall.py

If you want to generate tests on a Java class file having a main method, you need to use the concolic.py script. For example, the following command generates test inputs for the class tests.Testme (the java source of this class can be found in src/integration/java/tests/Testme.java.

python concolic.py --coverage 100 tests.Testme

Usage

python janala/concolic.py -h usage: concolic.py [-h] [--offline] [-v] [-c] [-D D] maxIterations className [arguments [arguments ...]]

positional arguments:

maxIterations   Maximum number of times the program under test can be
              executed.
className       Java class to be tested.
arguments       Arguments passed to the program under test.

optional arguments:

-h, --help      show this help message and exit
--offline       Perform concolic testing offline. An intermediate trace file
              is generated during the execution of the program. offilne
              mode results in 2X slowdown that non-offline mode
-v, --verbose   Print commands that are executed.
-c, --coverage  Compute detailed coverage by rerunning tests.
-D D            JVM options

Download Details:
Author: ksen007
Source Code: https://github.com/ksen007/janala2
License: BSD-2-Clause license

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CATG: A Concolic Testing Engine for Java
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7 Test Frameworks To Follow in 2021 for Java/Fullstack Developers

It is time to learn new test frameworks in 2021 to improve your code quality and decrease the time of your testing phase. Let’s explore 6 options for devs.

It is time to learn new test frameworks to improve your code quality and decrease the time of your testing phase. I have selected six testing frameworks that sound promising. Some have existed for quite a long time but I have not heard about them before.

At the end of the article, please tell me what you think about them and what your favorite ones are.

Robot Framework

Robot Framework is a generic open-source automation framework. It can be used for test automation and robotic process automation (RPA).

Robot Framework is open and extensible and can be integrated with virtually any other tool to create powerful and flexible automation solutions. Being open-source also means that Robot Framework is free to use without licensing costs.

The RoboFramework is a framework** to write test cases and automation processes.** It means that it may replace** your classic combo Selenium + Cucumber + Gherkins**. To be more precise, the Cucumber Gherkins custom implementation you wrote will be handled by RoboFramework and Selenium invoked below.

For the Java developers, this framework can be executed with Maven or Gradle (but less mature for the latter solution).

#java #testing #test #java framework #java frameworks #testing and developing #java testing #robot framework #test framework #2021

Tyrique  Littel

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How to Install OpenJDK 11 on CentOS 8

What is OpenJDK?

OpenJDk or Open Java Development Kit is a free, open-source framework of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (or Java SE). It contains the virtual machine, the Java Class Library, and the Java compiler. The difference between the Oracle OpenJDK and Oracle JDK is that OpenJDK is a source code reference point for the open-source model. Simultaneously, the Oracle JDK is a continuation or advanced model of the OpenJDK, which is not open source and requires a license to use.

In this article, we will be installing OpenJDK on Centos 8.

#tutorials #alternatives #centos #centos 8 #configuration #dnf #frameworks #java #java development kit #java ee #java environment variables #java framework #java jdk #java jre #java platform #java sdk #java se #jdk #jre #open java development kit #open source #openjdk #openjdk 11 #openjdk 8 #openjdk runtime environment

Samanta  Moore

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Going Beyond Java 8: Local Variable Type Inference (var) - DZone Java

According to some surveys, such as JetBrains’s great survey, Java 8 is currently the most used version of Java, despite being a 2014 release.

What you are reading is one in a series of articles titled ‘Going beyond Java 8,’ inspired by the contents of my book, Java for Aliens. These articles will guide you step-by-step through the most important features introduced to the language, starting from version 9. The aim is to make you aware of how important it is to move forward from Java 8, explaining the enormous advantages that the latest versions of the language offer.

In this article, we will talk about the most important new feature introduced with Java 10. Officially called local variable type inference, this feature is better known as the **introduction of the word **var. Despite the complicated name, it is actually quite a simple feature to use. However, some observations need to be made before we can see the impact that the introduction of the word var has on other pre-existing characteristics.

#java #java 11 #java 10 #java 12 #var #java 14 #java 13 #java 15 #verbosity

Tamia  Walter

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Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Samanta  Moore

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Spring Boot and Java 16 Records

In this article, we will discuss Java 16’s newest feature, Records. Then we will apply this knowledge and use it in conjunction with a Spring Boot application.

On March 16th, 2021, Java 16 was GA. With this new release, tons of new exciting features have been added. Check out the release notes to know more about these changes in detail. This article’s focus will be on Java Records, which got delivered with JEP 395. Records were first introduced in JDK 14 as a preview feature proposed by JEP 359, and with JDK 15, they remained in preview with JEP 384. However, with JDK 16, Records are no longer in preview.

I have picked Records because they are definitely the most favored feature added in Java 16, according to this Twitter poll by Java Champion Mala Gupta.

I also conducted a similar survey, but it was focused on features from Java 8 onwards. The results were not unexpected, as Java 8 is still widely used. Very unfortunate, though, as tons of new features and improvements are added to newer Java versions. But in terms of features, Java 8 was definitely a game-changer from a developer perspective.

So let’s discuss what the fuss is about Java Records.

#java #springboot #java programming #records #java tutorials #java programmer #java records #java 16