Reid  Rohan

Reid Rohan

1656919208

Netvis: D3.js-based tool To Visualize Network Communication

NetVis

NetVis is a highly customizable javascript framework for building interactive network visualizations:

Visualize any network activity by describing your network events in a straightforward JSON-based NetVis format detailing network nodes, events and messages.

Convert your server logs / network trace files to NetVis format and quickly visualize them. Generic nature of the tool means support for visualizing communication in any existing protocols, including IP, TCP, HTTP, TSL, BitCoin or IPFS as well as a pefrect tool for developing new network protocols.

Browse and traverse your network model with the d3-based graph visualization and time playback controls (play/pause/ffwd/rwind/speed) for events.

Customize the looks and appearance easily by overwriting the default View handlers in plain javascript. NetVis maintains the form and function customization separate. Specifying custom colors and tags for nodes and messages, or things like depicting the nodes on the georgaphical map is super simple.

NetVis is built by the IPFS (ipfs.io, github.com/jbenet/ipfs) and Filecoin (filecoin.io) team.

What can NetVis do for me?

Here is an example of the use case:

  1. Live nodes implementing protocols run, generating a real sequence of events. They store this sequence in one or many log files.
  2. The log files are consolidated into one netvis history.
  3. The history is fed into a simulator, which runs the visualization.

This means that the live nodes / producers need not emit netvis exactly; we can have a processing step in the pipeline that converts whatever the native protocol logs are into netvis. (for example, combining two differet entries, announcing an outgoing + incoming packet, into one single netvis message entry)

And it also means that simulators need not ingest netvis directly, but can also be processed to fit their purposes better. This makes netvis a middle-format that seeks to ensure all the necessary elements are present, and that both the producer and consumer programs handle them correctly.

netvis pipeline:

live nodes --> logs --> netvis logs --> simulator input --> simulator

NetVis format

See the specififcation draft.

Here is an example of a NetVis file:

  [
    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.077817100Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"nodeEntered",
      "name": "Earth"
    },

    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.477817180Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"messageSent",
      "destinationNode": "Qmd9uGaZ6vKTES5nezVyCZDP2zJzdii2EXWiCbyGYq1tZX",
      "message":
      {
          "request_id": "c655d844aed528caabfad155408ee5832ba64d78",
          "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.477817180Z",
          "protocol": "IPFS 0.1",
          "type": "join",
          "contents": "{\"body\":\"Hello Jupiter!This is Earth, bow to our might!\"}"
      }
    },

    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:02.000000003Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"messageReceived",
      "sourceNode": "Qmd9uGaZ6vKTES5nezVyCZDP2zJzdii2EXWiCbyGYq1tZX",
      "message":
      {
          "request_id": "a001c4d79b323808729ecfe673d84048e1725b39a96049dce2241dbd11d6abf9",
          "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.900000003Z",
          "protocol": "IPFS 0.1",
          "type": "lol",
          "contents": "lol wat"
      }
    }
  ]

We see an example of simple network activity where a node "Earth" sends a message to "Jupiter" and get a response.

Note that while the Earth node is defined with a nodeEntered event, Jupiter is only introduced implicitely, by being mentioned. That is acceptable, NetVis tries to deduce things as much as possible.

Other

Also see:

  • DESIGNDOC.md - netvis project design and API doc
  • netvis.md netvis network log file format specification
  • ROADMAP.md, project development roadmap
  • DEVELOPING.md, internal designdoc. If you are considering contributing, or just want to see how things work internally, awesome! That would be a good place to start.

( good place to start is the showcasing page.)

Author: dborzov
Source Code: https://github.com/dborzov/netvis 
License: MIT license

#javascript #d3 #network #protocol 

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Buddha Community

Netvis: D3.js-based tool To Visualize Network Communication

NBB: Ad-hoc CLJS Scripting on Node.js

Nbb

Not babashka. Node.js babashka!?

Ad-hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Status

Experimental. Please report issues here.

Goals and features

Nbb's main goal is to make it easy to get started with ad hoc CLJS scripting on Node.js.

Additional goals and features are:

  • Fast startup without relying on a custom version of Node.js.
  • Small artifact (current size is around 1.2MB).
  • First class macros.
  • Support building small TUI apps using Reagent.
  • Complement babashka with libraries from the Node.js ecosystem.

Requirements

Nbb requires Node.js v12 or newer.

How does this tool work?

CLJS code is evaluated through SCI, the same interpreter that powers babashka. Because SCI works with advanced compilation, the bundle size, especially when combined with other dependencies, is smaller than what you get with self-hosted CLJS. That makes startup faster. The trade-off is that execution is less performant and that only a subset of CLJS is available (e.g. no deftype, yet).

Usage

Install nbb from NPM:

$ npm install nbb -g

Omit -g for a local install.

Try out an expression:

$ nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6

And then install some other NPM libraries to use in the script. E.g.:

$ npm install csv-parse shelljs zx

Create a script which uses the NPM libraries:

(ns script
  (:require ["csv-parse/lib/sync$default" :as csv-parse]
            ["fs" :as fs]
            ["path" :as path]
            ["shelljs$default" :as sh]
            ["term-size$default" :as term-size]
            ["zx$default" :as zx]
            ["zx$fs" :as zxfs]
            [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn (path/resolve "."))

(prn (term-size))

(println (count (str (fs/readFileSync *file*))))

(prn (sh/ls "."))

(prn (csv-parse "foo,bar"))

(prn (zxfs/existsSync *file*))

(zx/$ #js ["ls"])

Call the script:

$ nbb script.cljs
"/private/tmp/test-script"
#js {:columns 216, :rows 47}
510
#js ["node_modules" "package-lock.json" "package.json" "script.cljs"]
#js [#js ["foo" "bar"]]
true
$ ls
node_modules
package-lock.json
package.json
script.cljs

Macros

Nbb has first class support for macros: you can define them right inside your .cljs file, like you are used to from JVM Clojure. Consider the plet macro to make working with promises more palatable:

(defmacro plet
  [bindings & body]
  (let [binding-pairs (reverse (partition 2 bindings))
        body (cons 'do body)]
    (reduce (fn [body [sym expr]]
              (let [expr (list '.resolve 'js/Promise expr)]
                (list '.then expr (list 'clojure.core/fn (vector sym)
                                        body))))
            body
            binding-pairs)))

Using this macro we can look async code more like sync code. Consider this puppeteer example:

(-> (.launch puppeteer)
      (.then (fn [browser]
               (-> (.newPage browser)
                   (.then (fn [page]
                            (-> (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
                                (.then #(.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"}))
                                (.catch #(js/console.log %))
                                (.then #(.close browser)))))))))

Using plet this becomes:

(plet [browser (.launch puppeteer)
       page (.newPage browser)
       _ (.goto page "https://clojure.org")
       _ (-> (.screenshot page #js{:path "screenshot.png"})
             (.catch #(js/console.log %)))]
      (.close browser))

See the puppeteer example for the full code.

Since v0.0.36, nbb includes promesa which is a library to deal with promises. The above plet macro is similar to promesa.core/let.

Startup time

$ time nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'
6
nbb -e '(+ 1 2 3)'   0.17s  user 0.02s system 109% cpu 0.168 total

The baseline startup time for a script is about 170ms seconds on my laptop. When invoked via npx this adds another 300ms or so, so for faster startup, either use a globally installed nbb or use $(npm bin)/nbb script.cljs to bypass npx.

Dependencies

NPM dependencies

Nbb does not depend on any NPM dependencies. All NPM libraries loaded by a script are resolved relative to that script. When using the Reagent module, React is resolved in the same way as any other NPM library.

Classpath

To load .cljs files from local paths or dependencies, you can use the --classpath argument. The current dir is added to the classpath automatically. So if there is a file foo/bar.cljs relative to your current dir, then you can load it via (:require [foo.bar :as fb]). Note that nbb uses the same naming conventions for namespaces and directories as other Clojure tools: foo-bar in the namespace name becomes foo_bar in the directory name.

To load dependencies from the Clojure ecosystem, you can use the Clojure CLI or babashka to download them and produce a classpath:

$ classpath="$(clojure -A:nbb -Spath -Sdeps '{:aliases {:nbb {:replace-deps {com.github.seancorfield/honeysql {:git/tag "v2.0.0-rc5" :git/sha "01c3a55"}}}}}')"

and then feed it to the --classpath argument:

$ nbb --classpath "$classpath" -e "(require '[honey.sql :as sql]) (sql/format {:select :foo :from :bar :where [:= :baz 2]})"
["SELECT foo FROM bar WHERE baz = ?" 2]

Currently nbb only reads from directories, not jar files, so you are encouraged to use git libs. Support for .jar files will be added later.

Current file

The name of the file that is currently being executed is available via nbb.core/*file* or on the metadata of vars:

(ns foo
  (:require [nbb.core :refer [*file*]]))

(prn *file*) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

(defn f [])
(prn (:file (meta #'f))) ;; "/private/tmp/foo.cljs"

Reagent

Nbb includes reagent.core which will be lazily loaded when required. You can use this together with ink to create a TUI application:

$ npm install ink

ink-demo.cljs:

(ns ink-demo
  (:require ["ink" :refer [render Text]]
            [reagent.core :as r]))

(defonce state (r/atom 0))

(doseq [n (range 1 11)]
  (js/setTimeout #(swap! state inc) (* n 500)))

(defn hello []
  [:> Text {:color "green"} "Hello, world! " @state])

(render (r/as-element [hello]))

Promesa

Working with callbacks and promises can become tedious. Since nbb v0.0.36 the promesa.core namespace is included with the let and do! macros. An example:

(ns prom
  (:require [promesa.core :as p]))

(defn sleep [ms]
  (js/Promise.
   (fn [resolve _]
     (js/setTimeout resolve ms))))

(defn do-stuff
  []
  (p/do!
   (println "Doing stuff which takes a while")
   (sleep 1000)
   1))

(p/let [a (do-stuff)
        b (inc a)
        c (do-stuff)
        d (+ b c)]
  (prn d))
$ nbb prom.cljs
Doing stuff which takes a while
Doing stuff which takes a while
3

Also see API docs.

Js-interop

Since nbb v0.0.75 applied-science/js-interop is available:

(ns example
  (:require [applied-science.js-interop :as j]))

(def o (j/lit {:a 1 :b 2 :c {:d 1}}))

(prn (j/select-keys o [:a :b])) ;; #js {:a 1, :b 2}
(prn (j/get-in o [:c :d])) ;; 1

Most of this library is supported in nbb, except the following:

  • destructuring using :syms
  • property access using .-x notation. In nbb, you must use keywords.

See the example of what is currently supported.

Examples

See the examples directory for small examples.

Also check out these projects built with nbb:

API

See API documentation.

Migrating to shadow-cljs

See this gist on how to convert an nbb script or project to shadow-cljs.

Build

Prequisites:

  • babashka >= 0.4.0
  • Clojure CLI >= 1.10.3.933
  • Node.js 16.5.0 (lower version may work, but this is the one I used to build)

To build:

  • Clone and cd into this repo
  • bb release

Run bb tasks for more project-related tasks.

Download Details:
Author: borkdude
Download Link: Download The Source Code
Official Website: https://github.com/borkdude/nbb 
License: EPL-1.0

#node #javascript

Reid  Rohan

Reid Rohan

1656919208

Netvis: D3.js-based tool To Visualize Network Communication

NetVis

NetVis is a highly customizable javascript framework for building interactive network visualizations:

Visualize any network activity by describing your network events in a straightforward JSON-based NetVis format detailing network nodes, events and messages.

Convert your server logs / network trace files to NetVis format and quickly visualize them. Generic nature of the tool means support for visualizing communication in any existing protocols, including IP, TCP, HTTP, TSL, BitCoin or IPFS as well as a pefrect tool for developing new network protocols.

Browse and traverse your network model with the d3-based graph visualization and time playback controls (play/pause/ffwd/rwind/speed) for events.

Customize the looks and appearance easily by overwriting the default View handlers in plain javascript. NetVis maintains the form and function customization separate. Specifying custom colors and tags for nodes and messages, or things like depicting the nodes on the georgaphical map is super simple.

NetVis is built by the IPFS (ipfs.io, github.com/jbenet/ipfs) and Filecoin (filecoin.io) team.

What can NetVis do for me?

Here is an example of the use case:

  1. Live nodes implementing protocols run, generating a real sequence of events. They store this sequence in one or many log files.
  2. The log files are consolidated into one netvis history.
  3. The history is fed into a simulator, which runs the visualization.

This means that the live nodes / producers need not emit netvis exactly; we can have a processing step in the pipeline that converts whatever the native protocol logs are into netvis. (for example, combining two differet entries, announcing an outgoing + incoming packet, into one single netvis message entry)

And it also means that simulators need not ingest netvis directly, but can also be processed to fit their purposes better. This makes netvis a middle-format that seeks to ensure all the necessary elements are present, and that both the producer and consumer programs handle them correctly.

netvis pipeline:

live nodes --> logs --> netvis logs --> simulator input --> simulator

NetVis format

See the specififcation draft.

Here is an example of a NetVis file:

  [
    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.077817100Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"nodeEntered",
      "name": "Earth"
    },

    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.477817180Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"messageSent",
      "destinationNode": "Qmd9uGaZ6vKTES5nezVyCZDP2zJzdii2EXWiCbyGYq1tZX",
      "message":
      {
          "request_id": "c655d844aed528caabfad155408ee5832ba64d78",
          "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.477817180Z",
          "protocol": "IPFS 0.1",
          "type": "join",
          "contents": "{\"body\":\"Hello Jupiter!This is Earth, bow to our might!\"}"
      }
    },

    {
      "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:02.000000003Z",
      "loggerID":"QmdqaPCyuyAD2DNGGVTEdUmH33sBF62YpSM7oWi1CoCkm8",
      "level": "info",
      "event":"messageReceived",
      "sourceNode": "Qmd9uGaZ6vKTES5nezVyCZDP2zJzdii2EXWiCbyGYq1tZX",
      "message":
      {
          "request_id": "a001c4d79b323808729ecfe673d84048e1725b39a96049dce2241dbd11d6abf9",
          "time": "2014-11-12T11:34:01.900000003Z",
          "protocol": "IPFS 0.1",
          "type": "lol",
          "contents": "lol wat"
      }
    }
  ]

We see an example of simple network activity where a node "Earth" sends a message to "Jupiter" and get a response.

Note that while the Earth node is defined with a nodeEntered event, Jupiter is only introduced implicitely, by being mentioned. That is acceptable, NetVis tries to deduce things as much as possible.

Other

Also see:

  • DESIGNDOC.md - netvis project design and API doc
  • netvis.md netvis network log file format specification
  • ROADMAP.md, project development roadmap
  • DEVELOPING.md, internal designdoc. If you are considering contributing, or just want to see how things work internally, awesome! That would be a good place to start.

( good place to start is the showcasing page.)

Author: dborzov
Source Code: https://github.com/dborzov/netvis 
License: MIT license

#javascript #d3 #network #protocol 

Fannie  Zemlak

Fannie Zemlak

1597932000

D3.js Examples for Advanced Uses - Custom Visualization

In the previous article D3-Force Directed Graph Layout Optimization in Nebula Graph Studio, we have discussed the advantages that D3.js has over other open source visualization libraries in custom graph and the flexible operations on the document object model (DOM) with D3 js. Given the customizability of the D3.js, is it possible to achieve whatever I want by using it? In this article, I will show you how to take full advantage of the flexibility of D3.js to realize on-demand functions which are not supported by D3.js itself.

Building the D3-Force Directed Graph

Here I won’t elaborate on the principle of the particle physical movement module of the d3-force. You can refer to our previous post if you are interested in this topic. Instead, I will focus on the practice of visualization in this article.

Now let me show you how I developed some new functions with the help of D3.js to better analyze the graph databases. Firstly, let’s build a simple relationship network with the d3-force directed graph.

Shell

1

this.force = d3

2

        .forceSimulation()

3

        // Allocate coordinates for the vertices

4

        .nodes(data.vertexes)

5

        // Link

6

        .force('link', linkForce)

7

        // For setting the center of gravity of the system

8

        .force('center', d3.forceCenter(width / 2, height / 2))

9

        // The gravity

10

        .force('charge', d3.forceManyBody().strength(-20))

11

        // The collision force, for preventing the vertices from overlapping

12

        .force('collide',d3.forceCollide().radius(60).iterations(2));

We can get the following vertices and relationships graph with the preceding code.

vertices and relationships

The preceding figure is a screenshot of the exploration tab of the graph visualization tool, Nebula Graph Studio. There you can select a certain vertex as the starting point of exploration by finding other vertices that are associated with it. For example, in this figure, vertex 100 and vertex 200 are connected with a single directed follow relation.

The problem is, if I have a super vertex which have thousands of edges, or if I want to display multi-hop query results, then the visual graph needs to display vertices and edges in huge density. It is also difficult to locate a specific vertex. Chances are users want to analyze only part of the data in the graph instead of the whole graph. Deleting the selected data will be a great solution to this scenario. You just delete the unwanted data and keep what you want.

Deleting the Selected

Before introducing how this function is implemented, let me begin with the native APIs provided by D3.js. Yes, I mean the enter() mentioned in the previous post and exit() I didn’t cover last time. Here are some descriptions from the documentation:

_When binding data, it’s likely that the array has more (or less) elements than the DOM elements. Fortunately D3 can help in adding and removing DOM elements using the _.enter_ and __.exit_. _If the array is longer than the selection there’s a shortfall of DOM elements and we need to add elements with __enter_. _If the array is shorter than the selection there’s a surplus of DOM elements and we need to remove elements with __exit_There are three cases in data binding:

• A shortfall of DOM elements

• A surplus of DOM elements

• The array is equal with the DOM elements

According to the documentation, it seems simple to implement the “deleting the selected” function. I was so optimistic that I thought simply operating on the data level was enough. Thus I deleted some vertices directly from the vertices data, then removed the extra element with the d3.select(this.nodeRef).exit().remove() API. Now let’s check the result of this operation:

Operation results

The targeted vertices are deleted as expected. However, other vertices are messed up because the colors and properties of the vertices are inconsistent with the current DOM vertices. Why? I checked the documentation more carefully and was inspired by an idea. Why not print the exit().remove() vertices out to see which vertices are removed?

Sure enough my guess has been confirmed. It’s the length change of the listening element that triggers the enter() and exit() function. That is to say, if two elements are taken out, the exit() will be triggered. But it won’t process the data you want to delete. Instead, it processes the last two vertices of the current data. In another word, enter() and exit() are triggered by the data length. However, take exit() as example, when D3.js detects any data length changes, say N, it will cut all the elements between the last N and the last element. On the contrary, enter() will add N pieces of data after the last element in the array.

Therefore, although the vertices are deleted from the previously returned data (apparently they are not the last element in the current array), the d3.select(this.nodeRef).exit() will locate the last element in the existing graph. This is totally a mess. So how to deal with this issue?

The D3.js recommends that you solve this problem with the officially provided merge function. But in our case, since we know the IDs of the vertices to be deleted, we operated directly on the DOM.

Here’s my simple yet effective solution. Since the exit() API can’t meet our requirements, I will process the vertices to be deleted separately. First I need to locate the DOM where the deleting operation is actually performed. To achieve this, I need to bind an ID to each vertex when rendering. Then I traverse. Find the corresponding DOM of the deleted vertices based on their ID. Following is my code:

#data visualization #d3.js #graph visualization #nebula graph

Hire Dedicated Node.js Developers - Hire Node.js Developers

If you look at the backend technology used by today’s most popular apps there is one thing you would find common among them and that is the use of NodeJS Framework. Yes, the NodeJS framework is that effective and successful.

If you wish to have a strong backend for efficient app performance then have NodeJS at the backend.

WebClues Infotech offers different levels of experienced and expert professionals for your app development needs. So hire a dedicated NodeJS developer from WebClues Infotech with your experience requirement and expertise.

So what are you waiting for? Get your app developed with strong performance parameters from WebClues Infotech

For inquiry click here: https://www.webcluesinfotech.com/hire-nodejs-developer/

Book Free Interview: https://bit.ly/3dDShFg

#hire dedicated node.js developers #hire node.js developers #hire top dedicated node.js developers #hire node.js developers in usa & india #hire node js development company #hire the best node.js developers & programmers

Gordon  Taylor

Gordon Taylor

1656186780

A time based / event series interactive visualization using d3.js

EventDrops

EventDrops is a time based / event series interactive visualization tool powered by D3.js.

EventDrops example

If you want to pan and zoom on previous data on your own, here is the demo.

Installation

EventDrops is provided as an npm package. Grab it using the tool of your choice:

yarn add event-drops
npm install --save event-drops

Note you don't need this step if you don't use any module bundler.

Since version 1.0, event-drops follows semantic versionning. Hence, we recommend checking your package.json file and ensure that event-drops version is preceded by a carret:

{
    "event-drops": "^1.0.0"
}

This way, you'll get all bug fixes and non breaking new features.

Usage

Without a Module Bundler

If you don't use any module bundler such as Webpack, we recommend using EventDrop script available on unpkg.com. Grabbing last versions of the library is as simple as:

<link href="https://unpkg.com/event-drops/dist/style.css" rel="stylesheet" />

<script src="https://unpkg.com/d3"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/event-drops"></script>

Then, the code is similar to the one with module bundler (see next paragraph), except you are not forced to specify D3 configuration parameter.

With a Module Bundler

If you use a module bundler, you can import EventDrops the following way:

import * as d3 from 'd3/build/d3';

import eventDrops from 'event-drops';

const chart = eventDrops({ d3 });

const repositoriesData = [
    {
        name: 'admin-on-rest',
        data: [{ date: new Date('2014/09/15 14:21:31') } /* ... */],
    },
    {
        name: 'event-drops',
        data: [{ date: new Date('2014/09/15 13:24:57') } /* ... */],
    },
    {
        name: 'sedy',
        data: [{ date: new Date('2014/09/15 13:25:12') } /* ... */],
    },
];

d3
    .select('#eventdrops-demo')
    .data([repositoriesData])
    .call(chart);

You can either use D3 as a specific import (specifying it in first argument of eventDrops call), or use the global one. By default, it fallbacks to a global defined d3.

Interface

eventDrops function takes as a single argument a configuration object, detailed in the:

Configuration Reference

In addition to this configuration object, it also exposes some public members allowing you to customize your application based on filtered data:

  • scale() provides the horizontal scale, allowing you to retrieve bounding dates thanks to .scale().domain(),
  • filteredData() returns an object with both data and fullData keys containing respectively bounds filtered data and full dataset.
  • draw(config, scale) redraws chart using given configuration and d3.scaleTime scale
  • destroy() execute this function before to removing the chart from DOM. It prevents some memory leaks due to event listeners.
  • currentBreakpointLabel returns current breakpoint (for instance small) among a list of breakpoints.

Hence, if you want to display number of displayed data and time bounds as in the demo, you can use the following code:

const updateCommitsInformation = chart => {
    const filteredData = chart
        .filteredData()
        .reduce((total, repo) => total.concat(repo.data), []);

    numberCommitsContainer.textContent = filteredData.length;
    zoomStart.textContent = humanizeDate(chart.scale().domain()[0]);
    zoomEnd.textContent = humanizeDate(chart.scale().domain()[1]);
};

Contributing

If you want to contribute to EventDrops, first, thank you!

To launch the project locally, grab this repository, install its dependencies, and launch the demo:

git clone git@github.com:marmelab/EventDrops.git
cd EventDrops
make install
make run

Demo will then be available on http://localhost:8080. Source files are watched automatically. Changing one file would automagically reload your browser.

When you are satisfied with your changes, ensure you didn't break anything launching tests:

make test

Finally, if everything is fine, you can then create a pull request.

Feel free to ask some help on GitHub issue tracker. The core team would be glad to help you to contribute.

Author: Marmelab
Source Code: https://github.com/marmelab/EventDrops 
License: MIT license

#javascript #d3 #visualization