The Complete PHP MySQL Professional Course with 5 Projects

The Complete PHP MySQL Professional Course with 5 Projects

The Complete PHP MySQL Professional Course with 5 Projects

Description
Have you ever wonder why their are so many PHP Mysql Courses but they offer very little practical skills. Sometimes its difficult for beginners to understand the long project right after learning basics due to lack of practice.Furthermore, big courses just give presentation to projects they never ever let students see their actual content. For example the basic videos, Free starter content etc. However this course is Scam-Free course. Students can watch more than 2 hour of initial content free of cost to decide weather to buy this course or not.

This course is designed in more logical way from easy to complex modules step by step. Here is description of the course

Road Map:

Building Blocks Fundamentals 5 Hour 30 mints of Content

Projects:

Regular Expressions 25 mints
Complete Contact Form + Email 1 Hour of Content
Dynamic Web Pages (Directory Project) 1 Hour of Content
CMS Based Employee Management CRUD 2 Hour + 30 minutes of Content
CMS + Admin Panel with Stunning blog + FREE Bootstrap 4.2.1 12 Hour of Content
This course will focus on all the Fundamentals , Building blocks and Advance Concepts of PHP in complete details which are essentials for beginners. In this Course students will build project after every section to see the real world representation of PHP.

Bonuses:

Getting Started with Bootstrap 4 FrameWork from scratch without using any Bootstrap Template
Latest Bootstrap 4.2.1 Essentials Practically in a Project
Using PHP Sessions in a more sophisticated way and pass information easily on different modules of Project
Full Coding Exercises
Login Logout Admin System
Tips / Tricks
Code Re-usability
Strong Security Techniques on Public Pages
PDO layer for Database Operations
Enhancing UI UX in admin Panel so that the Admin can manage the different Components of CMS / Blog easily
Enhancing UI UX in Public Panel so that the Public / Users can easily interact with the different Functionalities of Blog easily.
Using PHP Sessions in a more sophisticated way and pass information easily on different modules of Project
Login Logout Admin System
URL Tracking
Font Awesome
PHP 5.6 and 7 Supports
Admin Info Update
Now if you want to learn PHP and start your professional career, Take this course now

This course is for complete beginners and for those who want to build projects in PHP.

Who this course is for:

Complete Beginners
PHP Aspirants
Designers who want to Start Back-End Programming
College Students
Basic knowledge
No Knowledge required of PHP. This course will teach students everything about PHP from Scratch
Basic HTML
PC of-course :)
What will you learn
All PHP Fundamentals and Building Blocks with practical implementation in Projects
Form Validation with most Secure way using Regular Expressions
Making web pages dynamic with the variety of PHP Techniques
Employee Management System CRUD Application in PHP From Scartch
Complete CMS ( Content Management System) with Admin-Panel
Getting Started with Bootstrap 4 FrameWork from scratch without using any Bootstrap Template
Using PHP Sessions in a more sophisticated way and pass information easily on different modules of Project
Stunning Blog with Commenting functionality
Powerful Web Forms which will be Free of Hack
Build Professional CRUD
CMS Based Projects
Full Coding Exercises
Login Logout Admin System
Tips / Tricks
Sending Email using PHP
Bootstrap 4.2.1
PDO
URL Tracking
Security Techniques on Public pages
Font Awsome
To continue:

PhP MySQL Projects

PhP MySQL Projects

Simpliv LLC, a platform for learning and teaching online courses. We basically focus on online learning which helps to learn business concepts, software technology to develop personal and professional goals through video library by recognized industry experts and trainers.

Description
PHP Projects in Urdu is a comprehensive course. It has five PHP projects in Urdu. Each project is created from scratch. You will get source code of each project as well. The list of 5 projects is as under:

Project 1: Find and Replace Application
Project 2: Building an Email Marketing Application
Project 3: Creating a Contact Form
Project 4: Building a Search Engine For Database
Project 5: Building a PHP Quiz Application
As this is an intermediate level course so it has some requisites as well

This is a Urdu/Hindi video course

Who this Course is for:

Anyone who wants to learn Web development
Who wants to become a PHP Developer
Basic knowledge
You must have basic knowledge about PHP and Mysql
You must be able to write HTML and CSS as well
What will you learn
How to Find and Replace Application
How to Build an Email Marketing Application
How to Create a Contact Form
How to Build a Search Engine For Database
How to Build a PHP Quiz Application
To continue:

Advantages of Hiring PHP Developer for your Website Project

Advantages of Hiring PHP Developer for your Website Project

PHP - Hypertext pre-processor, a scripting language used by many people in developing web pages, but most of us are unaware even of the full form. To train someone and make them learn this whole language is as difficult and time-consuming as it is...

PHP - Hypertext pre-processor, a scripting language used by many people in developing web pages, but most of us are unaware even of the full form. To train someone and make them learn this whole language is as difficult and time-consuming as it is to learn the language yourself. That’s why PHP developers are there to make your life easy. This article will give us the advantages and requirements of Hire PHP Developer for our very own website project.

First of all, let us understand the value the right developer brings to the project and why it is important for your business.

A website is a major component of any company/business and is very important for its face value, the way it represents the company on the internet is critical for any business to succeed. This is the reason why companies are looking for PHP developers who can develop their webpage.

If you're planning to do an online business, your PHP programmer will be the first person to transfer your thinking onto the webpage. You should, therefore, employ developers from PHP to make your hypothetical idea a reality.

With this software programming language, PHP developers all-around can easily build website frameworks, web content management systems, web template systems, and various other web-based designs.

Some of the reasons why we need to outsource these developers are:

Not everyone is the best in each field, all of us have our specific skills and talents hence, PHP developers are also the best at what they do. The time and money spent on the training of the in house employees would be saved if the professional PHP developers are hired. Instead of multitasking, if the employees were to focus on what they’re good at it would increase productivity too.

The PHP developers would be much more professional than the in-house workers. It would lead to the seriousness of work. Hence, on-time delivery is guaranteed with hired PHP developers.

In addition to these benefits, you would also be able to track your project through every stage in constant communication with your online team. These advantages make it incredibly popular and smart to hire a PHP developer.

The PHP developers have in-depth knowledge of PHP, HTML and various frameworks in terms of technical capabilities. Hiring PHP developers are advised to give your website a professional look based on PHP.

Much of web success depends on the involvement of social media. The developer can add to your social networking pages a feature that explicitly redirects visitors. In addition, SEO experts also suggest better connections to the website's social network.

Just like a tailor stitches our dresses according to our preferences and is ready to make last-minute changes. A PHP developer will also be available at the nick of your call to make the website just the way you want it to be and have a customized solution for every problem.

Read also: Why & How to Hire Dedicated PHP Developer

At some point in your business, you’re going to have problems regarding your webpage due to the rapidly changing technology, instead of struggling with ideas like these and not being able to come up with an appropriate solution a PHP web developer could help us with our problems just like any technician would help us with the problems we face in our offices or any architect would help us with designing the structure of a building or any interior designer would help us with setting up our home. The PHP development company are hubs of workers who would help us overcome these problems and are always there.

Source by

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Laravel 5.8 Tutorial: Build your First CRUD App with Laravel and MySQL (PHP 7.1+)

Originally published at techiediaries.com on 12 Mar 2019

Throughout this tutorial for beginners you'll learn to use Laravel 5.8 - the latest version of one of the most popular PHP frameworks - to create a CRUD web application with a MySQL database from scratch and step by step starting with the installation of Composer (PHP package manager) to implementing and serving your application.

Note: Laravel 5.8 is recently released and this tutorial is upgraded to the latest version.
Also read: Laravel 5.8 REST CRUD API Tutorial - Build a CRM [PART 1]: Eloquent Models and Relationships
Laravel 5.8 New Features

Let's start our tutorial by going through the most important features introduced in this version.

  • The hasOneThrough Eloquent relationship.
  • Better email validation,
  • Auto-Discovery Of Model Policies provided that the model and policy follow standard Laravel naming conventions
  • DynamoDB cache and session drivers,
  • Added support for PHPUnit 8.0 for unit testing,
  • Added support for Carbon 2.0, an easy to use PHP API extension for DateTime,
  • Added support Pheanstalk 4.0: a pure PHP 5.3+ client for the beanstalkd workqueue, etc.

The Laravel 5.8 version has also corrected numeroous bugs and introduced many improvements of the Artisan CLI.

Check out the official docs for details features of Laravel 5.8

Prerequisites

This tutorial assumes you have PHP and MySQL installed on your system. Follow the instructions for your operating system to install both of them.

You also need to be familiar with Linux/macOS bash where we'll be executing the commands in this tutorial.

Familiarly with PHP is required since Laravel is based on PHP.

For development I will be using a Ubuntu 16.04 machine so the commands in this tutorial are targeting this system but you should be able to follow this tutorial in any operating system you use.

Installing PHP 7.1

Laravel v5.8 requires PHP 7.1 or above so you need the latest version of PHP installed on your system. The process is straightforward on most systems.

On Ubuntu, you can follow these instructions.

First add the ondrej/php PPA which contains the latest version of PHP:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ondrej/php
$ sudo apt-get update

Next, install PHP 7.1 using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php7.1

If you are using Ubuntu 18.04, PHP 7.2 is included in the default Ubuntu repository for 18.04 so you should be able to install it using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php
This tutorial is tested with PHP 7.1 but you can also use more recent versions like PHP 7.2 or PHP 7.3

Installing the Required PHP 7.1 Modules

Laravel requires a bunch of modules. You can install them using the following command:

$ sudo apt-get install php7.1 php7.1-cli php7.1-common php7.1-json php7.1-opcache php7.1-mysql php7.1-mbstring php7.1-mcrypt php7.1-zip php7.1-fpm php7.1-xml
Installing PHP Composer

Let's start our journey by install Composer, The PHP package manager.

Navigate in your home directory, then download the installer from the official website using curl:

$ cd ~
$ curl -sS https://getcomposer.org/installer -o composer-setup.php

You can then install composer globally on your system by using the following command:

$ sudo php composer-setup.php --install-dir=/usr/local/bin --filename=composer

As of this writing Composer 1.8 will be installed on your system. You can make sure your installation works as expected by running composer in your terminal:

$ composer

You should get the following output:

   ______
  / ____/___  ____ ___  ____  ____  ________  _____
 / /   / __ \/ __ `__ \/ __ \/ __ \/ ___/ _ \/ ___/
/ /___/ /_/ / / / / / / /_/ / /_/ (__  )  __/ /
\____/\____/_/ /_/ /_/ .___/\____/____/\___/_/
                    /_/
Composer version 1.8.0 2018-12-03 10:31:16

Usage:
command [options] [arguments]

Options:
-h, --help Display this help message
-q, --quiet Do not output any message
-V, --version Display this application version
--ansi Force ANSI output
--no-ansi Disable ANSI output
-n, --no-interaction Do not ask any interactive question
--profile Display timing and memory usage information
--no-plugins Whether to disable plugins.
-d, --working-dir=WORKING-DIR If specified, use the given directory as working directory.
-v|vv|vvv, --verbose Increase the verbosity of messages: 1 for normal output, 2 for more verbose output and 3 for debug

For more information check out this tutorial.

If you've successfully installed Composer in your system, you are ready to create a Laravel 5.8 project.

Installing and Creating a Laravel 5.8 Project

In this section we'll introduce Laravel and then proceed it to install and create a Laravel 5.8 project.

About Laravel

Laravel docs describe it as:

Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. We believe development must be an enjoyable and creative experience to be truly fulfilling. Laravel attempts to take the pain out of development by easing common tasks used in the majority of web projects, such as:
  • Simple, fast routing engine.
  • Powerful dependency injection container.
  • Multiple back-ends for session and cache storage.
  • Expressive, intuitive database ORM.
  • Database agnostic schema migrations.
  • Robust background job processing.
  • Real-time event broadcasting.
Laravel is accessible, yet powerful, providing tools needed for large, robust applications.

Generating a Laravel 5.8 project is easy and straightforward. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ composer create-project  --prefer-dist  laravel/laravel laravel-first-crud-app

This will install laravel/laravel v5.8.3.

Note: Make sure you have PHP 7.1 installed on your system. Otherwise, composer will use Laravel 5.5 for your project.

You can verify the installed version in your project using:

$ cd laravel-first-crud-app
$ php artisan -V
Laravel Framework 5.8.19
Installing the Front-End Dependencies

In your generated project, you can see that a package.json file is generated which includes many front-end libraries that can be used by your project:

  • axios,
  • bootstrap,
  • cross-env,
  • jquery,
  • laravel-mix,
  • lodash,
  • popper.js,
  • resolve-url-loader,
  • sass,
  • sass-loader,
  • vue.
Note: You can use your preferred libraries with Laravel not specifically the ones added to package.json.
The package.json file in your Laravel project includes a few packages such as vue and axios to help you get started building your JavaScript application.
It also includes bootstrap to help you get started with Bootstrap for styling your UI.
It include Laravel Mix to help you compile your SASS files to plain CSS.

You need to use npm to install the front-end dependencies:

$ npm install

After running this command a node_modules folder will be created and the dependencies will be installed into it.

Note: You need to have Node.js and npm installed on your system before you can install the front-end dependencies.
Creating a MySQL Database

Let's now create a MySQL database that we'll use to persist dat ain our Laravel application. In your terminal, run the following command to run the mysql client:

$ mysql -u root -p

When prompted, enter the password for your MySQL server when you've installed it.

Next, run the following SQL statement to create a db database:

mysql> create database db;

Open the .env file and update the credentials to access your MySQL database:

DB_CONNECTION=mysql
DB_HOST=127.0.0.1
DB_PORT=3306
DB_DATABASE=db
DB_USERNAME=root
DB_PASSWORD=******

You need to enter the database name, the username and password.

At this point, you can run the migrate command to create your database and a bunch of SQL tables needed by Laravel:

$ php artisan migrate
Note: You can run the migrate command at any other points of your development to add other SQL tables in your database or to later your database if you need to add any changes later.
Creating your First Laravel Model

Laravel uses the MVC architectural pattern to organize your application in three decoupled parts:

  • The Model which encapsulates the data access layer,
  • The View which encapsulates the representation layer,
  • Controller which encapsulates the code to control the application and communicates with the model and view layers.

Wikipedia defines MVC as:

Model–view–controller is an architectural pattern commonly used for developing user interfacesthat divides an application into three interconnected parts. This is done to separate internal representations of information from the ways information is presented to and accepted from the user.

Now, let's create our first Laravel Model. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ php artisan make:model Contact --migration

This will create a Contact model and a migration file. In the terminal, we get an output similar to:

Model created successfully.
Created Migration: 2019_01_27_193840_create_contacts_table

Open the database/migrations/xxxxxx_create_contacts_table migration file and update it accordingly:

<?php

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Schema;
use Illuminate\Database\Schema\Blueprint;
use Illuminate\Database\Migrations\Migration;

class CreateContactsTable extends Migration
{
/**
* Run the migrations.
*
* @return void
*/
public function up()
{
Schema::create('contacts', function (Blueprint $table) {
$table->increments('id');
$table->timestamps();
$table->string('first_name');
$table->string('last_name');
$table->string('email');
$table->string('job_title');
$table->string('city');
$table->string('country');
});
}

/**
 * Reverse the migrations.
 *
 * @return void
 */
public function down()
{
    Schema::dropIfExists('contacts');
}

}

We added the first_namelast_nameemailjob_titlecity and country fields in the contacts table.

You can now create the contacts table in the database using the following command:

$ php artisan migrate

Now, let's look at our Contact model, which will be used to interact with the contacts database table. Open the app/Contact.php and update it:

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Contact extends Model
{
protected $fillable = [
'first_name',
'last_name',
'email',
'city',
'country',
'job_title'
];
}

Creating the Controller and Routes

After creating the model and migrated our database. Let's now create the controller and the routes for working with the Contact model. In your terminal, run the following command:

$ php artisan make:controller ContactController --resource
Laravel resource routing assigns the typical "CRUD" routes to a controller with a single line of code. For example, you may wish to create a controller that handles all HTTP requests for "photos" stored by your application. Using the make:controller Artisan command, we can quickly create such a controller:
This command will generate a controller at app/Http/Controllers/PhotoController.php. The controller will contain a method for each of the available resource operations.

Open the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file. This is the initial content:

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers;

use Illuminate\Http\Request;

class ContactController extends Controller
{
/**
* Display a listing of the resource.
*
* @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
*/
public function index()
{
//
}

/**
 * Show the form for creating a new resource.
 *
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function create()
{
    //
}

/**
 * Store a newly created resource in storage.
 *
 * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function store(Request $request)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Display the specified resource.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function show($id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Show the form for editing the specified resource.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function edit($id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Update the specified resource in storage.
 *
 * @param  \Illuminate\Http\Request  $request
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function update(Request $request, $id)
{
    //
}

/**
 * Remove the specified resource from storage.
 *
 * @param  int  $id
 * @return \Illuminate\Http\Response
 */
public function destroy($id)
{
    //
}

}

The ContactController class extends Controller class available from Laravel and defines a bunch of methods which will be used to do the CRUD operations against the Contact model.

You can read the role of the method on the comment above it.

Now we need to provide implementations for these methods.

But before that, let's add routing. Open the routes/web.php file and update it accordingly:

<?php
Route::get('/', function () {
return view('welcome');
});

Route::resource('contacts', 'ContactController');

Using the resource() static method of Route, you can create multiple routes to expose multiple actions on the resource.

These routes are mapped to various ContactController methods which will need to implement in the next section:

  • GET/contacts, mapped to the index() method,
  • GET /contacts/create, mapped to the create() method,
  • POST /contacts, mapped to the store() method,
  • GET /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the show() method,
  • GET /contacts/{contact}/edit, mapped to the edit() method,
  • PUT/PATCH /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the update() method,
  • DELETE /contacts/{contact}, mapped to the destroy() method.

These routes are used to serve HTML templates and also as API endpoints for working with the Contactmodel.

Note: If you want to create a controller that will only expose a RESTful API, you can use the apiResource method to exclude the routes that are used to serve the HTML templates:
Route::apiResource('contacts', 'ContactController');
Implementing the CRUD Operations

Let's now implement the controller methods alongside the views.

C: Implementing the Create Operation and Adding a Form

The ContactController includes the store() method that maps to the POST /contacts API endpoint which will be used to create a contact in the database and the create() that maps to the GET /contacts/create route which will be used to serve the HTML form used to submit the contact to POST /contacts API endpoint.

Let's implement these two methods.

Re-open the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file and start by importing the Contactmodel:

use App\Contact;

Next, locate the store() method and update it accordingly:

    public function store(Request $request)
{
$request->validate([
'first_name'=>'required',
'last_name'=>'required',
'email'=>'required'
]);

    $contact = new Contact([
        'first_name' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('first_name'),
        'last_name' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('last_name'),
        'email' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('email'),
        'job_title' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('job_title'),
        'city' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('city'),
        'country' =&gt; $request-&gt;get('country')
    ]);
    $contact-&gt;save();
    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact saved!');
}

Next, locate the create() method and update it:

    public function create()
{
return view('contacts.create');
}

The create() function makes use of the view() method to return the create.blade.php template which needs to be present in the resources/views folder.

Before creating the create.blade.php template we need to create a base template that will be extended by the create template and all the other templates that will create later in this tutorial.

In the resources/views folder, create a base.blade.php file:

$ cd resources/views
$ touch base.blade.php

Open the resources/views/base.blade.php file and add the following blade template:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
<title>Laravel 5.8 & MySQL CRUD Tutorial</title>
<link href="{{ asset('css/app.css') }}" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
</head>
<body>
<div class="container">
@yield('main')
</div>
<script src="{{ asset('js/app.js') }}" type="text/js"></script>
</body>
</html>

Now, let's create the create.blade.php template. First, create a contacts folder in the views folder:

$ mkdir contacts

Next, create the template

$ cd contacts
$ touch create.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/create.blade.php file and add the following code:

@extends('base')

@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-8 offset-sm-2">
<h1 class="display-3">Add a contact</h1>
<div>
@if ($errors->any())
<div class="alert alert-danger">
<ul>
@foreach ($errors->all() as $error)
<li>{{ $error }}</li>
@endforeach
</ul>
</div><br />
@endif
<form method="post" action="{{ route('contacts.store') }}">
@csrf
<div class="form-group">
<label for="first_name">First Name:</label>
<input type="text" class="form-control" name="first_name"/>
</div>

      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="last_name"&gt;Last Name:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="last_name"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;

      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="email"&gt;Email:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="email"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="city"&gt;City:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="city"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="country"&gt;Country:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="country"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;
      &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
          &lt;label for="job_title"&gt;Job Title:&lt;/label&gt;
          &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="job_title"/&gt;
      &lt;/div&gt;                         
      &lt;button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary-outline"&gt;Add contact&lt;/button&gt;
  &lt;/form&gt;

</div>
</div>
</div>
@endsection

This is a screenshot of our create form!

Fill out the form and click on the Add contact button to create a contact in the database. You should be redirected to /contacts route which doesn't have a view associated to it yet.

R: Implementing the Read Operation and Getting Data

Next, let's implement the read operation to get and display contacts data from our MySQL database.

Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the index() method and update it:

    public function index()
{
$contacts = Contact::all();

    return view('contacts.index', compact('contacts'));
}

Next, you need to create the the index template. Create a resources/views/contacts.index.blade.phpfile:

$ touch index.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/index.blade.php file and add the following code:

@extends('base')

@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-12">
<h1 class="display-3">Contacts</h1>
<table class="table table-striped">
<thead>
<tr>
<td>ID</td>
<td>Name</td>
<td>Email</td>
<td>Job Title</td>
<td>City</td>
<td>Country</td>
<td colspan = 2>Actions</td>
</tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
@foreach($contacts as $contact)
<tr>
<td>{{$contact->id}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->first_name}} {{$contact->last_name}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->email}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->job_title}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->city}}</td>
<td>{{$contact->country}}</td>
<td>
<a href="{{ route('contacts.edit',$contact->id)}}" class="btn btn-primary">Edit</a>
</td>
<td>
<form action="{{ route('contacts.destroy', $contact->id)}}" method="post">
@csrf
@method('DELETE')
<button class="btn btn-danger" type="submit">Delete</button>
</form>
</td>
</tr>
@endforeach
</tbody>
</table>
<div>
</div>
@endsection

U: Implementing the Update Operation

Next, we need to implement the update operation. Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the edit($id) method and update it:

    public function edit($id)
{
$contact = Contact::find($id);
return view('contacts.edit', compact('contact'));
}

Next, you need to implement the update() method:

    public function update(Request $request, $id)
{
$request->validate([
'first_name'=>'required',
'last_name'=>'required',
'email'=>'required'
]);

    $contact = Contact::find($id);
    $contact-&gt;first_name =  $request-&gt;get('first_name');
    $contact-&gt;last_name = $request-&gt;get('last_name');
    $contact-&gt;email = $request-&gt;get('email');
    $contact-&gt;job_title = $request-&gt;get('job_title');
    $contact-&gt;city = $request-&gt;get('city');
    $contact-&gt;country = $request-&gt;get('country');
    $contact-&gt;save();

    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact updated!');
}

Now, you need to add the edit template. Inside the resources/views/contacts/, create an edit.blade.php file:

$ touch edit.blade.php

Open the resources/views/contacts/edit.blade.php file and add this code:

@extends('base')
@section('main')
<div class="row">
<div class="col-sm-8 offset-sm-2">
<h1 class="display-3">Update a contact</h1>

    @if ($errors-&gt;any())
    &lt;div class="alert alert-danger"&gt;
        &lt;ul&gt;
            @foreach ($errors-&gt;all() as $error)
            &lt;li&gt;{{ $error }}&lt;/li&gt;
            @endforeach
        &lt;/ul&gt;
    &lt;/div&gt;
    &lt;br /&gt; 
    @endif
    &lt;form method="post" action="{{ route('contacts.update', $contact-&gt;id) }}"&gt;
        @method('PATCH') 
        @csrf
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;

            &lt;label for="first_name"&gt;First Name:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="first_name" value={{ $contact-&gt;first_name }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;

        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="last_name"&gt;Last Name:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="last_name" value={{ $contact-&gt;last_name }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;

        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="email"&gt;Email:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="email" value={{ $contact-&gt;email }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="city"&gt;City:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="city" value={{ $contact-&gt;city }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="country"&gt;Country:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="country" value={{ $contact-&gt;country }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;div class="form-group"&gt;
            &lt;label for="job_title"&gt;Job Title:&lt;/label&gt;
            &lt;input type="text" class="form-control" name="job_title" value={{ $contact-&gt;job_title }} /&gt;
        &lt;/div&gt;
        &lt;button type="submit" class="btn btn-primary"&gt;Update&lt;/button&gt;
    &lt;/form&gt;
&lt;/div&gt;

</div>
@endsection

U: Implementing the Delete Operation

Finally, we'll proceed to implement the delete operation. Go to the app/Http/Controllers/ContactController.php file, locate the destroy() method and update it accordingly:

    public function destroy($id)
{
$contact = Contact::find($id);
$contact->delete();

    return redirect('/contacts')-&gt;with('success', 'Contact deleted!');
}

You can notice that when we redirect to the /contacts route in our CRUD API methods, we also pass a success message but it doesn't appear in our index template. Let's change that!

Go to the resources/views/contacts/index.blade.php file and add the following code:

<div class="col-sm-12">

@if(session()->get('success'))
<div class="alert alert-success">
{{ session()->get('success') }}
</div>
@endif
</div>

We also need to add a button to takes us to the create form. Add this code below the header:

    <div>
<a style="margin: 19px;" href="{{ route('contacts.create')}}" class="btn btn-primary">New contact</a>
</div>

This is a screenshot of the page after we created a contact:

Conclusion

We've reached the end of this tutorial. We created a CRUD application with Laravel 5.8, PHP 7.1 and MySQL.

Hope you enjoyed the tutorial and see you in the next one!


Originally published at techiediaries.com on 12 Mar 2019

=====================================

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