Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole

1566891692

Building full-stack web apps with Go, Vecty and WebAssembly

Many of us have heard of — and maybe written — full-stack web applications. We do them in a variety of different ways, but the common denominator is usually JavaScript and Node.js.

Today, we’re going to break with that tradition and write a complete web applicationfront end and backend – without writing a line of JavaScript. We’ll be comparing the developer experience to JavaScript along the way, but we’re going to be only writing Go for this entire project.

We’ll learn how to build a single page link shortener application with just Go, and we’ll end up with working code that shows it in action.

Prerequisites

Today, we’re going to be focusing on Go so make sure you’ve installed the tooling on your machine. I’m going to assume you have basic knowledge of Go, but check out the free Tour of Go to brush up (or learn!) if you need to.

All the shell commands that I’m going to be showing work on a Mac, but should also work on most Linux systems (including WSL!).

Finally, make sure to clone the repository with the code for this article.

And then you’re good to go, let’s get started!

Getting started

First, we’re going to get the application running locally.

Coming from Webpack and surrounding technologies — which you’d use to build a web app with JavaScript — building and running this application is embarrassingly easy. There’s a front-end and a backend part (more on that below), and you compile both of them with the go tool, which requires no configuration.

First, run the backend server:

$ go run .

Next, build the front end in a new terminal window:

$ cd frontend
$ GOOS=js GOARCH=wasm go build -o ../public/frontend.wasm

Finally, go to https://localhost:8081 in your browser to see the app in action.

How this all works

Like most web apps, our link shortener has a front-end and backend piece. In our app, the backend is just a static server written in Go. All of the magic is in the front-end directory, so let’s start there!

If you’re familiar with React or the DOM, you’ll recognize a lot of the concepts we’ll cover. If not, this stuff will come naturally.

We’re using a new Go framework called Vecty to organize our application. Vecty forces you to break down your app into components and arrange them into a tree. The whole scheme is really similar to HTML and the DOM or React.

Here’s what our app’s high-level components would look like if they were HTML:

  • A h2 for the title of the page
  • A form to enter the link to shorten
  • A div to hold the shortened link (this value is dynamically updated as the user types the link into the above)
  • An a to save the short link

Vecty components are so similar to React that they look like the Go equivalent of JSX, except that they have more parentheses.

Let’s zoom in on one and see how it works. Here’s the code for the form component:

elem.Form(
    elem.Input(vecty.Markup(
        event.Input(func(e *vecty.Event) {
            short := uuid.NewV4().String()[0:5]
            h.shortened = short
            vecty.Rerender(h)
        }),
    )),
)

First, elem.Form and elem.Input on lines 1 and 2 are for the <form> and <input> tags, respectively. Those are both Go functions that take one or more arguments. Each argument is something that goes between the opening and closing HTML tags. For example, the stuff we pass to elem.Form goes in between <form> and </form>. This is what the above Go code would look like in HTML:

<form>
    <input>
    </input>
</form>

Pretty simple, right?

The last piece of code we didn’t look at is that event.Input function. This is an event handler just like in HTML/JavaScript. This function takes in another function, which in this case is roughly an onchange handler. Just like you’d expect, that *vecty.Event argument the handler takes in is roughly the same as the JavaScript event.

The logic to actually shorten the link is all inside this handler, and it’s fairly simple. Here is that code commented thoroughly:

// First, make a new UUID and take the first 5 characters of it.
// This will be our new shortcode
short := uuid.NewV4().String()[0:5]
// Next, write the shortcode to a variable. This variable is shared
// with the <div>, so when we re-render this component, the <div> will
// get updated
h.shortened = short
// Finally, re-render the component so that the <div> gets the new shortcode.
// Unlike React, there's no automatic diff functionality. We tell Vecty
// explicitly which components to re-render.
vecty.Rerender(h)

You get web assembly for free

Vecty can scale to big applications because of this component structure, and we can scale our app as big as we want by adding more components as needed. For example, we can add a component above our current top-level to dynamically route to different sub-components based on the URL. This would be similar to some of the popular react-router implementations.

One final thing to keep in mind is that WASM is not HTML, it’s a full departure from the DOM and everything HTML.

I compared all the components in the last section to HTML tags, but they aren’t! That’s where the big difference between Vecty / WASM and React comes in. We’re compiling our Go code straight to WASM, which represents these components differently from the DOM.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, you get some big benefits from using Go and Vecty to build apps:

  1. You get to think in terms of components and nesting, just like with React and the DOM
  2. You can write as much dynamic logic as you want, right next to your components, all in pure Go
  3. You can share code between the server and client, similar to writing a React client and a Node.js server
  4. You get to take advantage of WASM
  5. Or you can compile your Vecty code to HTML too if you want! That’s a whole other article

Thanks for reading

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter

Further reading about WebAssembly

WebAssembly: The Future of JS and a Multi-Language Web

Using WebAssembly With Node.js

Get started with WebAssembly using JavaScript

WebAssembly for Web Developers

What is WebAssembly?

Speed, Speed, Speed: JavaScript vs C++ vs WebAssembly

WebAssembly Disrupting JavaScript

WebAssembly: Expectation vs. Reality

#webassembly #go #web-development #mobile-apps

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Building full-stack web apps with Go, Vecty and WebAssembly
Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1595059664

How long does it take to develop/build an app?

With more of us using smartphones, the popularity of mobile applications has exploded. In the digital era, the number of people looking for products and services online is growing rapidly. Smartphone owners look for mobile applications that give them quick access to companies’ products and services. As a result, mobile apps provide customers with a lot of benefits in just one device.

Likewise, companies use mobile apps to increase customer loyalty and improve their services. Mobile Developers are in high demand as companies use apps not only to create brand awareness but also to gather information. For that reason, mobile apps are used as tools to collect valuable data from customers to help companies improve their offer.

There are many types of mobile applications, each with its own advantages. For example, native apps perform better, while web apps don’t need to be customized for the platform or operating system (OS). Likewise, hybrid apps provide users with comfortable user experience. However, you may be wondering how long it takes to develop an app.

To give you an idea of how long the app development process takes, here’s a short guide.

App Idea & Research

app-idea-research

_Average time spent: two to five weeks _

This is the initial stage and a crucial step in setting the project in the right direction. In this stage, you brainstorm ideas and select the best one. Apart from that, you’ll need to do some research to see if your idea is viable. Remember that coming up with an idea is easy; the hard part is to make it a reality.

All your ideas may seem viable, but you still have to run some tests to keep it as real as possible. For that reason, when Web Developers are building a web app, they analyze the available ideas to see which one is the best match for the targeted audience.

Targeting the right audience is crucial when you are developing an app. It saves time when shaping the app in the right direction as you have a clear set of objectives. Likewise, analyzing how the app affects the market is essential. During the research process, App Developers must gather information about potential competitors and threats. This helps the app owners develop strategies to tackle difficulties that come up after the launch.

The research process can take several weeks, but it determines how successful your app can be. For that reason, you must take your time to know all the weaknesses and strengths of the competitors, possible app strategies, and targeted audience.

The outcomes of this stage are app prototypes and the minimum feasible product.

#android app #frontend #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #web development #android app development #app development #app development for ios and android #app development process #ios and android app development #ios app development #stages in app development

Aria Barnes

Aria Barnes

1625490702

Is Full-Stack Developer A Vaccine For Startups?

There's a wise old saying: "Working with a full stack developer can lead to better technology solutions." And in recent years, this saying has proven to be true for many startups.

In the last few years, we have heard a lot about full-stack developers.

We know that a full-stack developer is a person who has complete knowledge of the different layers involved in application development. Whether you are dealing with the front or back end or working in the business layer, they take care of everything with ease.

But did you wonder why a full-stack developer is so important for a startup? 

This blog will answer all such queries. So let's get started.

The Demand for Full-Stack Developers

As per a development report published recently, it was seen that there had been a 206% increase in demand for full-stack developers from 2018 to 2020. This is because more companies seek multifaceted skills. 


Full-stack developers or a full-stack development company are able to take care of all the development needs of your project. So whether it's front-end or back-end development or enterprise layer development, they are competent to work on everything. You can always hire full-stack developers for your business needs.

What can a Full-Stack Developer Do?

In terms of software development, there are front-end developers and back-end developers. Front-end developers create the interface, while backend developers design the software. 

A full-stack developer can do everything. They take care of application design, server-side scripting, client-side coding, coding, administration, database creation, and any other project development needs.

The following are the responsibilities of a full stack developer that you hire:

  • Manage web development

  • Code applications and programs

  • Solve problems

  • Coordinate with other team members and developers

  • Think about testing techniques for web applications

In short, a full-stack developer has a strong understanding of the technologies that determine how a website looks, functions, and functions. The said developer must have a working knowledge of HTML, JavaScript, CSS, PHP, Angular, Ruby, MySQL, Node, MongoDB, Apache, etc. The knowledge to work with animations and design will add a bonus point to a candidate's portfolio.

Over time, the skills required for full-stack development have expanded and evolved. Long ago, the LAMP stack included Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. It is more than MEAN and beyond today. 

Currently, a typical mean stack development service provides developers who can perform front-end development using JavaScript, HTML, CSS, and other JS frameworks; for the backend, they use Express and Node, and for databases, they follow MySQL and MongoDB.

Top Reasons to Hire Full-Stack Developers

  • Effective troubleshooting

When hiring a full-stack developer, companies are always looking for candidates who are capable of solving a problem. Full-stack developers are competent to handle all aspects of the project. They prove to be a practical solution for startups that are not willing to spend more money on many developers.

  • Wide range of technology skills

The main reason companies choose full-stack developers for their projects is their potential rather than their knowledge. Over time, companies teach them the skills they want them to have. In this way, in a few years, they learn different technological skills as the company expands.

  • Executive and management skills

Companies like to have people with business experience on board. A full-stack developer has the knowledge and expertise to work on the front-end, backend, and media architecture layers. This means that they are capable of performing better than an individual front-end or backend developer.

  • Economic

As full-stack developers can develop all aspects of a project, it is not necessary to form a team of experts. They will easily handle the project without help from anyone. This will save the right amount of money for the recruiting team.

  • Faster development process

Full-stack developers know different technologies, tools, and techniques. This means that when they take the project, they will be able to complete it faster. They will spend less time discussing and collaborating with the team on the project.

Benefits of Full-Stack Developers for Startups and Small Businesses

  • Established developers

Full-stack developers have enough experience to create outstanding features for the final product, which will be able to excite the market. They have the ability to build a complete product from scratch. If you want to gain some benefits from your product, you will have to collaborate with these experts. Remember that not all developers are capable of handling the project from a 360-degree perspective.

  • Versatility

A full-stack developer is able to work equally well on the front-end and the backend of a website or application. Front-end developers write code using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS, which are able to control the appearance of the solution and how it interacts with the browser and users. Backend developers write code that connects the website or application with other content management systems. A full-stack developer is capable of handling both tasks. They are focused on meeting customer expectations and finding solutions on their own.

 

  • Vast experience

Full-stack developers take on different web projects. This has helped them gain in-depth knowledge of various technologies and the experience to find quick solutions in web and application development. Such understanding and knowledge improve the performance of the project and its reception in the market.

  • The largest photograph

The main advantage of choosing a full-stack developer for your project is that they will come up with the complete structure of the project and offer their valuable input to the project as needed. Their services go beyond project development to maintain and optimize existing solutions.

  • Upgrades

Web design plays a crucial role in whether most people love or reject a website. Full-stack developers will make sure that the website is pretty user-friendly. They keep up with trends and technological innovations. To make sure their clients get the best interactive and responsive website, the developers implement intelligent features in their projects.

  • Troubleshooting issues

Full-stack developers have complete knowledge and experience of the different stages and aspects of website development. They are skilled enough to identify problems that may arise during the development of the project. They will propose long-term solutions to ensure that the website or application works optimally based on their findings.

  • All-inclusive

In addition to leading your web project and enabling enhancements to it, full-stack developers move to the level of representing your product to stakeholders or your company at conferences. They can move quickly from one operation to another with ease, streamlining the development process.

  • Economic

If you are on a tight budget but want to create a fantastic website, then you should consider hiring full developers for the job. You can even think about having a remote full-stack developer for the project. As such, a developer is capable of handling all aspects of project development; you won't have to hire different people for the job. This will save you a lot of money.

  • Delivery time

It will be easy for developers to share responsibilities among the team and coordinate with each other for better project progress. This will result in faster delivery of the project.

  • Project ownership

When you hire full-stack developers for your project, you can be sure that they will take care of everything. Such a developer will be able to develop MVP from start to finish. If you hire a full-stack developer in the middle of the project, even then, you'll find a way to join the flow seamlessly. Such a developer will work towards quality control of the design project.

 

 

Summing Up

So these were the advantages of hiring a full-stack developer. I hope you have noted the changes that a full-stack developer can bring to the table and in your company. However, working with a full-stack developer is the best way to work with a top full-stack development company in India.

It is a good idea that full-stack development companies bring to your projects are phenomenal and groundbreaking due to the expertise and experience that full-stack development companies bring to your projects.

If you have any other queries or suggestions, feel free to comment below.

Original source

#full stack developers #hire full stack developers #full stack development #mean stack development service #hire full stack developer india #hire full stack developer

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Rachel Cole

Rachel Cole

1566891692

Building full-stack web apps with Go, Vecty and WebAssembly

Many of us have heard of — and maybe written — full-stack web applications. We do them in a variety of different ways, but the common denominator is usually JavaScript and Node.js.

Today, we’re going to break with that tradition and write a complete web applicationfront end and backend – without writing a line of JavaScript. We’ll be comparing the developer experience to JavaScript along the way, but we’re going to be only writing Go for this entire project.

We’ll learn how to build a single page link shortener application with just Go, and we’ll end up with working code that shows it in action.

Prerequisites

Today, we’re going to be focusing on Go so make sure you’ve installed the tooling on your machine. I’m going to assume you have basic knowledge of Go, but check out the free Tour of Go to brush up (or learn!) if you need to.

All the shell commands that I’m going to be showing work on a Mac, but should also work on most Linux systems (including WSL!).

Finally, make sure to clone the repository with the code for this article.

And then you’re good to go, let’s get started!

Getting started

First, we’re going to get the application running locally.

Coming from Webpack and surrounding technologies — which you’d use to build a web app with JavaScript — building and running this application is embarrassingly easy. There’s a front-end and a backend part (more on that below), and you compile both of them with the go tool, which requires no configuration.

First, run the backend server:

$ go run .

Next, build the front end in a new terminal window:

$ cd frontend
$ GOOS=js GOARCH=wasm go build -o ../public/frontend.wasm

Finally, go to https://localhost:8081 in your browser to see the app in action.

How this all works

Like most web apps, our link shortener has a front-end and backend piece. In our app, the backend is just a static server written in Go. All of the magic is in the front-end directory, so let’s start there!

If you’re familiar with React or the DOM, you’ll recognize a lot of the concepts we’ll cover. If not, this stuff will come naturally.

We’re using a new Go framework called Vecty to organize our application. Vecty forces you to break down your app into components and arrange them into a tree. The whole scheme is really similar to HTML and the DOM or React.

Here’s what our app’s high-level components would look like if they were HTML:

  • A h2 for the title of the page
  • A form to enter the link to shorten
  • A div to hold the shortened link (this value is dynamically updated as the user types the link into the above)
  • An a to save the short link

Vecty components are so similar to React that they look like the Go equivalent of JSX, except that they have more parentheses.

Let’s zoom in on one and see how it works. Here’s the code for the form component:

elem.Form(
    elem.Input(vecty.Markup(
        event.Input(func(e *vecty.Event) {
            short := uuid.NewV4().String()[0:5]
            h.shortened = short
            vecty.Rerender(h)
        }),
    )),
)

First, elem.Form and elem.Input on lines 1 and 2 are for the <form> and <input> tags, respectively. Those are both Go functions that take one or more arguments. Each argument is something that goes between the opening and closing HTML tags. For example, the stuff we pass to elem.Form goes in between <form> and </form>. This is what the above Go code would look like in HTML:

<form>
    <input>
    </input>
</form>

Pretty simple, right?

The last piece of code we didn’t look at is that event.Input function. This is an event handler just like in HTML/JavaScript. This function takes in another function, which in this case is roughly an onchange handler. Just like you’d expect, that *vecty.Event argument the handler takes in is roughly the same as the JavaScript event.

The logic to actually shorten the link is all inside this handler, and it’s fairly simple. Here is that code commented thoroughly:

// First, make a new UUID and take the first 5 characters of it.
// This will be our new shortcode
short := uuid.NewV4().String()[0:5]
// Next, write the shortcode to a variable. This variable is shared
// with the <div>, so when we re-render this component, the <div> will
// get updated
h.shortened = short
// Finally, re-render the component so that the <div> gets the new shortcode.
// Unlike React, there's no automatic diff functionality. We tell Vecty
// explicitly which components to re-render.
vecty.Rerender(h)

You get web assembly for free

Vecty can scale to big applications because of this component structure, and we can scale our app as big as we want by adding more components as needed. For example, we can add a component above our current top-level to dynamically route to different sub-components based on the URL. This would be similar to some of the popular react-router implementations.

One final thing to keep in mind is that WASM is not HTML, it’s a full departure from the DOM and everything HTML.

I compared all the components in the last section to HTML tags, but they aren’t! That’s where the big difference between Vecty / WASM and React comes in. We’re compiling our Go code straight to WASM, which represents these components differently from the DOM.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, you get some big benefits from using Go and Vecty to build apps:

  1. You get to think in terms of components and nesting, just like with React and the DOM
  2. You can write as much dynamic logic as you want, right next to your components, all in pure Go
  3. You can share code between the server and client, similar to writing a React client and a Node.js server
  4. You get to take advantage of WASM
  5. Or you can compile your Vecty code to HTML too if you want! That’s a whole other article

Thanks for reading

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

Follow us on Facebook | Twitter

Further reading about WebAssembly

WebAssembly: The Future of JS and a Multi-Language Web

Using WebAssembly With Node.js

Get started with WebAssembly using JavaScript

WebAssembly for Web Developers

What is WebAssembly?

Speed, Speed, Speed: JavaScript vs C++ vs WebAssembly

WebAssembly Disrupting JavaScript

WebAssembly: Expectation vs. Reality

#webassembly #go #web-development #mobile-apps

Hire Full Stack Developers

If you are looking for a full-stack mobile developer for your web or mobile app development needs?

Hire Full Stack Developers to develop any type of web, mobile, or desktop applications from start-to-end. HourlyDeveloper.io full-stack programmers know their way around different tiers of software development, servers, databases, APIs, MVC, and hosting environments among others.

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