Announcing OpenJDK for Windows 10 on ARM | Java at Microsoft

Last year Microsoft announced the acquisition of jClarity to optimize Java™ workloads on Azure. This kicked off the beginning of our Java Engineering Group in Microsoft’s Developer Division, helping deliver on the vision of any developer, any app, and any platform.

Today, our team is excited to share that it has completed the first phase of porting OpenJDK™ for Windows 10 on Arm® (AArch64) based devices, and now we are in the process of upstreaming the initial changes to the OpenJDK project. The port, led by Monica Beckwith with support from Ludovic Henry and other engineers from the team and partners, has been submitted to the OpenJDK project in partnership with Red Hat. An Early Access binary is available via our GitHub project, and developers are welcome to download and try it.

Read Monica’s message to the OpenJDK mailing list.

Microsoft has seen great enthusiasm in the market and the increased adoption of ARM64 architecture on laptops, and recently on servers. With much higher energy efficiency, the use of ARM64 can drastically reduce the cost of data centers and extend the battery life of personal devices. For many workloads and user preferences, Windows is the OS of choice, and because of that, the Java Engineering Group moved forward with this port to support those users.

While still not 100% feature complete, this port is based on the OpenJDK tip branch (16+) and can run most workloads, including SPEC SERT – after our contributions towards the new platform combination gets accepted – and all of the SPEC Java suites. Developers can start developing Java on Windows 10 ARM64 compatible laptops, like the Surface Pro X, with the core Java extensions on the recently-announced Visual Studio Code for Windows ARM64 along with traditional tools like Apache Maven, Gradle, and others – check out the VS Code for Java May Update. More details on the current limitations of the port, and roadmap, can be found on Monica’s message to the OpenJDK project, and on the GitHub repo’s README.

While optimizing Java for Azure remains one of our core goals, it is crucial to share that we are involved in other initiatives to make the Java platform even better on areas besides the Cloud. Microsoft in itself is heavily invested in Java as it can be seen from this slide below, recently presented by Martijn Verburg at this year’s Microsoft Build session “Modern Java for Cloud Developers.”

#java #open source #arm #arm64 #openjdk #windows

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Announcing OpenJDK for Windows 10 on ARM | Java at Microsoft
Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1600135200

How to Install OpenJDK 11 on CentOS 8

What is OpenJDK?

OpenJDk or Open Java Development Kit is a free, open-source framework of the Java Platform, Standard Edition (or Java SE). It contains the virtual machine, the Java Class Library, and the Java compiler. The difference between the Oracle OpenJDK and Oracle JDK is that OpenJDK is a source code reference point for the open-source model. Simultaneously, the Oracle JDK is a continuation or advanced model of the OpenJDK, which is not open source and requires a license to use.

In this article, we will be installing OpenJDK on Centos 8.

#tutorials #alternatives #centos #centos 8 #configuration #dnf #frameworks #java #java development kit #java ee #java environment variables #java framework #java jdk #java jre #java platform #java sdk #java se #jdk #jre #open java development kit #open source #openjdk #openjdk 11 #openjdk 8 #openjdk runtime environment

Announcing OpenJDK for Windows 10 on ARM | Java at Microsoft

Last year Microsoft announced the acquisition of jClarity to optimize Java™ workloads on Azure. This kicked off the beginning of our Java Engineering Group in Microsoft’s Developer Division, helping deliver on the vision of any developer, any app, and any platform.

Today, our team is excited to share that it has completed the first phase of porting OpenJDK™ for Windows 10 on Arm® (AArch64) based devices, and now we are in the process of upstreaming the initial changes to the OpenJDK project. The port, led by Monica Beckwith with support from Ludovic Henry and other engineers from the team and partners, has been submitted to the OpenJDK project in partnership with Red Hat. An Early Access binary is available via our GitHub project, and developers are welcome to download and try it.

Read Monica’s message to the OpenJDK mailing list.

Microsoft has seen great enthusiasm in the market and the increased adoption of ARM64 architecture on laptops, and recently on servers. With much higher energy efficiency, the use of ARM64 can drastically reduce the cost of data centers and extend the battery life of personal devices. For many workloads and user preferences, Windows is the OS of choice, and because of that, the Java Engineering Group moved forward with this port to support those users.

While still not 100% feature complete, this port is based on the OpenJDK tip branch (16+) and can run most workloads, including SPEC SERT – after our contributions towards the new platform combination gets accepted – and all of the SPEC Java suites. Developers can start developing Java on Windows 10 ARM64 compatible laptops, like the Surface Pro X, with the core Java extensions on the recently-announced Visual Studio Code for Windows ARM64 along with traditional tools like Apache Maven, Gradle, and others – check out the VS Code for Java May Update. More details on the current limitations of the port, and roadmap, can be found on Monica’s message to the OpenJDK project, and on the GitHub repo’s README.

While optimizing Java for Azure remains one of our core goals, it is crucial to share that we are involved in other initiatives to make the Java platform even better on areas besides the Cloud. Microsoft in itself is heavily invested in Java as it can be seen from this slide below, recently presented by Martijn Verburg at this year’s Microsoft Build session “Modern Java for Cloud Developers.”

#java #open source #arm #arm64 #openjdk #windows

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1620458875

Going Beyond Java 8: Local Variable Type Inference (var) - DZone Java

According to some surveys, such as JetBrains’s great survey, Java 8 is currently the most used version of Java, despite being a 2014 release.

What you are reading is one in a series of articles titled ‘Going beyond Java 8,’ inspired by the contents of my book, Java for Aliens. These articles will guide you step-by-step through the most important features introduced to the language, starting from version 9. The aim is to make you aware of how important it is to move forward from Java 8, explaining the enormous advantages that the latest versions of the language offer.

In this article, we will talk about the most important new feature introduced with Java 10. Officially called local variable type inference, this feature is better known as the **introduction of the word **var. Despite the complicated name, it is actually quite a simple feature to use. However, some observations need to be made before we can see the impact that the introduction of the word var has on other pre-existing characteristics.

#java #java 11 #java 10 #java 12 #var #java 14 #java 13 #java 15 #verbosity

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1600959600

Microsoft to Contribute to Java on Windows and Mac ARM

Microsoft, Azul, and other community members are collaborating to port OpenJDK to MacOS and Windows on the AArch64 chipset. This work coincides with the upcoming availability of ARM-based Macs and aims to have a supported OpenJDK build in approximate alignment to market availability and adoption of the new chip.

“Azul is building an Aarch64 port for MacOS, has drafted a JEP for the work, will do the work in the open as much as possible (limited by Apple’s developer kit early access rules), and will contribute the complete work upstream to be included in e.g. OpenJDK 16 or 17. Once we land this upstream, we also intend to build OpenJDK 11 and 8 variants and make sure developers and users have free binary OpenJDK distros available that will work on ARM-based Mac,” explains Gil Tene, CTO of Azul, which maintains the freely available Zulu build of OpenJDK across many platforms.

#arm #microsoft #java #development #news

Samanta  Moore

Samanta Moore

1620462686

Spring Boot and Java 16 Records

In this article, we will discuss Java 16’s newest feature, Records. Then we will apply this knowledge and use it in conjunction with a Spring Boot application.

On March 16th, 2021, Java 16 was GA. With this new release, tons of new exciting features have been added. Check out the release notes to know more about these changes in detail. This article’s focus will be on Java Records, which got delivered with JEP 395. Records were first introduced in JDK 14 as a preview feature proposed by JEP 359, and with JDK 15, they remained in preview with JEP 384. However, with JDK 16, Records are no longer in preview.

I have picked Records because they are definitely the most favored feature added in Java 16, according to this Twitter poll by Java Champion Mala Gupta.

I also conducted a similar survey, but it was focused on features from Java 8 onwards. The results were not unexpected, as Java 8 is still widely used. Very unfortunate, though, as tons of new features and improvements are added to newer Java versions. But in terms of features, Java 8 was definitely a game-changer from a developer perspective.

So let’s discuss what the fuss is about Java Records.

#java #springboot #java programming #records #java tutorials #java programmer #java records #java 16