Debbie Clay

Debbie Clay

1574366935

Getting Started with Docker - Docker Fundamentals tutorial

This tutorial will explain the fundamentals of Docker and start you with some basic usage.

Table of Contents

  • What is Docker?
  • Installation
  • Creating Your First Docker Image
  • Conclusion

What is Docker?

Docker is open source software to pack, ship and run any application as a lightweight container. Containers are completely hardware and platform independent so you don’t have to worry about whether what you are creating will run everywhere.

In the past virtual machines have been used to accomplish many if these same goals. However, Docker containers are smaller and have far less overhead than VMs. VMs are not portable as different VM runtime environments are very different. Docker containers are extremely portable. Finally, VMs were not built with software developers in mind; they contain no concept of versioning, and logging/monitoring is very difficult. Docker images, on the other hand, are built from layers that can be version controlled. Docker has logging functionality readily available for use.

You might be wondering what could go into a “container”. Well, anything! You can isolate pieces of your system into separate containers. You could potentially have a container for nginx, a container for MongoDB, and one for Redis. Containers are very easy to setup. Major projects like nginx, MongoDB, and Redis all offer free Docker images for you to use; you can install and run any of these containers with just one shell command. This is much easier than using a virtual machine (even with something like Vagrant).

Installation

Installing Docker is very easy. Visit the official Docker installation page and follow the instructions tailored for your operating system. There are simple installers for both Mac OS X and Windows.

After you’ve installed Docker, open the terminal and type the following:


$ docker info

If your installation worked, you will see a bunch of information about your Docker installation. If not, you will need to revisit the install docs.

Creating Your First Docker Image

Every Docker container is an “instance” of a Docker image. There is a massive library of pre-built Docker images. However, in order to really understand Docker, you should create an image as an exercise.

Let’s create a Docker image for running Redis. Redis is an easy to use in-memory key/value store. It is commonly used as an object cache for many different platforms across many different environments and programming languages.

Remember how I said Docker images are built from layers? Well, every Docker image has to start with a base layer. Common base layers are Ubuntu and CentOS. Let’s use Ubuntu. (In production I would use Debian since it is much smaller.)

The following command will start a Docker container based on the Ubuntu:latest image. :latest is called the image tag and in this case refers to the latest version of Ubuntu. If you don’t have the image locally, it will download it first. The container will be started in a bash terminal. Run the following:


$ docker run --name my-redis -it ubuntu:latest bash

-it let’s us interact with our container via the command line. --name just gives us a convenient way to reference our container. You should now be inside your container in a bash terminal seeing something like this:


$ root@ed35631e96f9

As you can see, you are logged in as root to the container so no need for sudo. The Ubuntu base image is very bare bones. An important stratey for creating Docker images is keeping them as light as possible. Therefore you have to install a lot of things you normally just have. First, let’s install wget:


$ apt-get update
$ apt-get install wget

We need a few other things to build Redis from source and run it:


$ apt-get install build-essential tcl8.5

Now let’s install Redis:


$ wget http://download.redis.io/releases/redis-stable.tar.gz
$ tar xzf redis-stable.tar.gz
$ cd redis-stable
$ make
$ make install
$ ./utils/install_server.sh

This downloads the newest version of Redis, builds it from source, and runs the installer. You will need to answer some configuration questions. Just use all the defaults. Now start Redis by running the following (it might already be started):


$ service redis_6379 start

You now have Redis started in a Docker container. The next step is saving your image. We want to be able to save the image as it is so we can distribute it and use it elsewhere.

Note: this container is an example, and is missing some things to make it truly usable such as port mapping. We will make a production ready image in the next section.

Exit your container by running:


$ exit

Note that your container is now stopped since you exited bash. You can easily configure containers to run in the background though.

Run the following command:


$ docker ps -a

This command shows us all of our docker containers, running or stopped. See the container tagged with my-redis. That’s the one we created! Now let’s commit our container as an image:


$ docker commit -m "Added Redis" -a "Your Name" my-redis tlovett1/my-redis:latest

This command compiles our container’s changes into an image. -m specifies a commit message, and -a let’s us specify an author. tlovett/my-redis:latest is formatted author/name:version. Author refers to your username on Docker Hub. If you don’t want to push your image to the Docker Hub, then this doesn’t matter, and you can use anything you want. If you do, you will need to create an account and use docker push to push the image upstream.

Docker commit creates an image containing the changes we made to the original Ubuntu image. This makes distributing Docker containers super fast since people won’t have to re-download layers (such as Ubuntu:latest) that they already have. In a container, every time you run a command, add a file or directory, create an environmental variable, etc. a new layer is created. Docker commit groups these layers into an image. When distributing Docker images, you should carefully optimize your layers to keep them as small as possible. This tutorial does not cover layer optimization.

You might be thinking that this is somewhat messy since your container is basically a black box. What if you want to redo your image? Would you have to write down the steps to reproduce the entire thing? What if you wanted to recreate your image from CentOS instead of Ubuntu? Your thinking would be correct. Creating Docker images in this way is not the best idea. Instead you should use Dockerfiles.

Your First Dockerfile

A Dockerfile is a set of instructions written as a shell script for creating a Docker image. Let’s create a Dockerfile that generates an image like the one we just created manually but with some important additions.

Create a file called Dockerfile. Paste the following into the new file:


FROM ubuntu:latest
RUN apt-get update
RUN apt-get install -y wget
RUN apt-get install -y build-essential tcl8.5
RUN wget http://download.redis.io/releases/redis-stable.tar.gz
RUN tar xzf redis-stable.tar.gz
RUN cd redis-stable && make && make install
RUN ./redis-stable/utils/install_server.sh
EXPOSE 6379
ENTRYPOINT  ["redis-server"]

There are some special things in this Dockerfile. FROM tells Docker which image to start from. As you can see, we are starting with Ubuntu. RUN simply runs a shell command. EXPOSE opens up a port to be publically accessible. 6379 is the standard Redis port. ENTRYPOINT designates the command or application to be run when a container is created. In this case whenever a container is created from our image, redis-server will be run.

Now that we’ve written our Dockerfile, let’s build an image from it. Run the following command from within the folder of your Dockerfile:


$ docker build -t redis .

This command will create an image tagged redis from your Dockerfile.

Finally, let’s create a running container from our image. Run the following command:


$ docker run -d -p 6379:6379 redis

That’s it! Now you have Redis up-and-running on your machine.This container/image is production ready.

Conclusion

Docker is a powerful tool for creating and running distributable, lightweight applications both locally and in production.

There are many tools and services available to be used in Docker. For example, Dockunit is a tool powered by Docker that lets you test your software across any environment. This tutorial has just scratched the surface of the Docker world.

#Docker #devops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Getting Started with Docker - Docker Fundamentals tutorial
Shubham Ankit

Shubham Ankit

1657081614

How to Automate Excel with Python | Python Excel Tutorial (OpenPyXL)

How to Automate Excel with Python

In this article, We will show how we can use python to automate Excel . A useful Python library is Openpyxl which we will learn to do Excel Automation

What is OPENPYXL

Openpyxl is a Python library that is used to read from an Excel file or write to an Excel file. Data scientists use Openpyxl for data analysis, data copying, data mining, drawing charts, styling sheets, adding formulas, and more.

Workbook: A spreadsheet is represented as a workbook in openpyxl. A workbook consists of one or more sheets.

Sheet: A sheet is a single page composed of cells for organizing data.

Cell: The intersection of a row and a column is called a cell. Usually represented by A1, B5, etc.

Row: A row is a horizontal line represented by a number (1,2, etc.).

Column: A column is a vertical line represented by a capital letter (A, B, etc.).

Openpyxl can be installed using the pip command and it is recommended to install it in a virtual environment.

pip install openpyxl

CREATE A NEW WORKBOOK

We start by creating a new spreadsheet, which is called a workbook in Openpyxl. We import the workbook module from Openpyxl and use the function Workbook() which creates a new workbook.

from openpyxl
import Workbook
#creates a new workbook
wb = Workbook()
#Gets the first active worksheet
ws = wb.active
#creating new worksheets by using the create_sheet method

ws1 = wb.create_sheet("sheet1", 0) #inserts at first position
ws2 = wb.create_sheet("sheet2") #inserts at last position
ws3 = wb.create_sheet("sheet3", -1) #inserts at penultimate position

#Renaming the sheet
ws.title = "Example"

#save the workbook
wb.save(filename = "example.xlsx")

READING DATA FROM WORKBOOK

We load the file using the function load_Workbook() which takes the filename as an argument. The file must be saved in the same working directory.

#loading a workbook
wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")

 

GETTING SHEETS FROM THE LOADED WORKBOOK

 

#getting sheet names
wb.sheetnames
result = ['sheet1', 'Sheet', 'sheet3', 'sheet2']

#getting a particular sheet
sheet1 = wb["sheet2"]

#getting sheet title
sheet1.title
result = 'sheet2'

#Getting the active sheet
sheetactive = wb.active
result = 'sheet1'

 

ACCESSING CELLS AND CELL VALUES

 

#get a cell from the sheet
sheet1["A1"] <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A1 >

  #get the cell value
ws["A1"].value 'Segment'

#accessing cell using row and column and assigning a value
d = ws.cell(row = 4, column = 2, value = 10)
d.value
10

 

ITERATING THROUGH ROWS AND COLUMNS

 

#looping through each row and column
for x in range(1, 5):
  for y in range(1, 5):
  print(x, y, ws.cell(row = x, column = y)
    .value)

#getting the highest row number
ws.max_row
701

#getting the highest column number
ws.max_column
19

There are two functions for iterating through rows and columns.

Iter_rows() => returns the rows
Iter_cols() => returns the columns {
  min_row = 4, max_row = 5, min_col = 2, max_col = 5
} => This can be used to set the boundaries
for any iteration.

Example:

#iterating rows
for row in ws.iter_rows(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in row:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

  #iterating columns
for col in ws.iter_cols(min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 3):
  for cell in col:
  print(cell) <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.A3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.B3 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C2 >
  <
  Cell 'Sheet1'.C3 >

To get all the rows of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.rows and to get all the columns of the worksheet we use the method worksheet.columns. Similarly, to iterate only through the values we use the method worksheet.values.


Example:

for row in ws.values:
  for value in row:
  print(value)

 

WRITING DATA TO AN EXCEL FILE

Writing to a workbook can be done in many ways such as adding a formula, adding charts, images, updating cell values, inserting rows and columns, etc… We will discuss each of these with an example.

 

CREATING AND SAVING A NEW WORKBOOK

 

#creates a new workbook
wb = openpyxl.Workbook()

#saving the workbook
wb.save("new.xlsx")

 

ADDING AND REMOVING SHEETS

 

#creating a new sheet
ws1 = wb.create_sheet(title = "sheet 2")

#creating a new sheet at index 0
ws2 = wb.create_sheet(index = 0, title = "sheet 0")

#checking the sheet names
wb.sheetnames['sheet 0', 'Sheet', 'sheet 2']

#deleting a sheet
del wb['sheet 0']

#checking sheetnames
wb.sheetnames['Sheet', 'sheet 2']

 

ADDING CELL VALUES

 

#checking the sheet value
ws['B2'].value
null

#adding value to cell
ws['B2'] = 367

#checking value
ws['B2'].value
367

 

ADDING FORMULAS

 

We often require formulas to be included in our Excel datasheet. We can easily add formulas using the Openpyxl module just like you add values to a cell.
 

For example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']

ws['A9'] = '=SUM(A2:A8)'

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

The above program will add the formula (=SUM(A2:A8)) in cell A9. The result will be as below.

image

 

MERGE/UNMERGE CELLS

Two or more cells can be merged to a rectangular area using the method merge_cells(), and similarly, they can be unmerged using the method unmerge_cells().

For example:
Merge cells

#merge cells B2 to C9
ws.merge_cells('B2:C9')
ws['B2'] = "Merged cells"

Adding the above code to the previous example will merge cells as below.

image

UNMERGE CELLS

 

#unmerge cells B2 to C9
ws.unmerge_cells('B2:C9')

The above code will unmerge cells from B2 to C9.

INSERTING AN IMAGE

To insert an image we import the image function from the module openpyxl.drawing.image. We then load our image and add it to the cell as shown in the below example.

Example:

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.drawing.image
import Image

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("new1.xlsx")
ws = wb['Sheet']
#loading the image(should be in same folder)
img = Image('logo.png')
ws['A1'] = "Adding image"
#adjusting size
img.height = 130
img.width = 200
#adding img to cell A3

ws.add_image(img, 'A3')

wb.save("new2.xlsx")

Result:

image

CREATING CHARTS

Charts are essential to show a visualization of data. We can create charts from Excel data using the Openpyxl module chart. Different forms of charts such as line charts, bar charts, 3D line charts, etc., can be created. We need to create a reference that contains the data to be used for the chart, which is nothing but a selection of cells (rows and columns). I am using sample data to create a 3D bar chart in the below example:

Example

import openpyxl
from openpyxl
import Workbook
from openpyxl.chart
import BarChart3D, Reference, series

wb = openpyxl.load_workbook("example.xlsx")
ws = wb.active

values = Reference(ws, min_col = 3, min_row = 2, max_col = 3, max_row = 40)
chart = BarChart3D()
chart.add_data(values)
ws.add_chart(chart, "E3")
wb.save("MyChart.xlsx")

Result
image


How to Automate Excel with Python with Video Tutorial

Welcome to another video! In this video, We will cover how we can use python to automate Excel. I'll be going over everything from creating workbooks to accessing individual cells and stylizing cells. There is a ton of things that you can do with Excel but I'll just be covering the core/base things in OpenPyXl.

⭐️ Timestamps ⭐️
00:00 | Introduction
02:14 | Installing openpyxl
03:19 | Testing Installation
04:25 | Loading an Existing Workbook
06:46 | Accessing Worksheets
07:37 | Accessing Cell Values
08:58 | Saving Workbooks
09:52 | Creating, Listing and Changing Sheets
11:50 | Creating a New Workbook
12:39 | Adding/Appending Rows
14:26 | Accessing Multiple Cells
20:46 | Merging Cells
22:27 | Inserting and Deleting Rows
23:35 | Inserting and Deleting Columns
24:48 | Copying and Moving Cells
26:06 | Practical Example, Formulas & Cell Styling

📄 Resources 📄
OpenPyXL Docs: https://openpyxl.readthedocs.io/en/stable/ 
Code Written in This Tutorial: https://github.com/techwithtim/ExcelPythonTutorial 
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/TechWithTim/featured 

#python 

Bongani  Ngema

Bongani Ngema

1670346000

How to Create & Add Content - Images, Text To Modern SharePoint Pages

Description

Requirement is to create Modern pages with content, which includes images and text. 

The Content is in SharePoint List. The pages are created from a Page Template.

To get Text part from Page template, use below PowerShell,

#get page textpart instance id
$parts=Get-PnPPageComponent -Page <pagename.aspx>

Execute the below PowerShell to create pages with HTML content from SharePoint List.

$logFile = "Logs\LogFile.log"
Start - Transcript - Path $logFile - Append
#Variables
$libName = "Site Pages"
$siteURL = "https://tenant.sharepoint.com/"
$contentType = "Group and Division Page"
$listname = "Content"
$sectionCategoy = "Our organisation"
#End
Try {
    #Connect to PnP Online
    $connection = Connect - PnPOnline - Url $siteURL - UseWebLogin - ReturnConnection - WarningAction Ignore
    #Get items from Content list
    $items = Get - PnPListItem - List $listName - PageSize 100
    foreach($item in $items) {
        if ($null - ne $item["Title"] - and $null - ne $item["Content"]) {
            #Get Page webparts instance Id
            #$parts = Get - PnPPageComponent - Page PageTemplate.aspx
            # load the page template
            $template = Get - PnPClientSidePage - Identity "Templates/Division-page-template"
            #Get page name
            $fullFileName = $item["Title"].Replace(" ", "_") + ".aspx"
            #Create fileURL
            $fileURL = $siteURL + $libName + "/" + $fullFileName
            # save a new SharePoint Page based on the Page Template
            $template.Save($fullFileName)
            $page = Get - PnPPage - Identity $fullFileName
            $htmlToInject = $item["Content"]
            $htmlToInject = $htmlToInject.TrimStart('{"Html":"').TrimEnd('"}') - replace([regex]::Escape('\n')), '' - replace([regex]::Escape('<a href=\')),' < a href = ' -replace ([regex]:: Escape('\
                        ">')),'" > ' -replace ([regex]::Escape(' & bull; % 09 ')),'
                        ' -replace '
                        https:
                        /*','https://'
            #Set PnP Page Text

            Set-PnPPageTextPart -Page $page -InstanceId "9fab3ce6-0638-4008-a9b9-cf2b784245b5" -Text $htmlToInject


            #publish page
            Set-PnPPage -Identity $fullFileName -Title $item["Title"] -ContentType $contentType -Publish

            #get site pages library
            $sitepagelist= Get-PnPList -Identity 'Site Pages'
            #get page Id and page Item to update section category
            $pageItem=Get-PnPListItem -List $sitepagelist -Id $page.PageId
            Set-PnPListItem -Values @{"SectionCategory" = $sectionCategoy} -List $sitepagelist -Identity $pageItem

        }
        else
        {
            Write-Host "Title or Content has no value"
        }
    }
}
Catch {
    Write-Host "Error: $($_.Exception.Message)" -Foregroundcolor Red
}
Stop-Transcript

Original article source at: https://www.c-sharpcorner.com/

#sharepoint #image #text 

Willie  Beier

Willie Beier

1596728880

Tutorial: Getting Started with R and RStudio

In this tutorial we’ll learn how to begin programming with R using RStudio. We’ll install R, and RStudio RStudio, an extremely popular development environment for R. We’ll learn the key RStudio features in order to start programming in R on our own.

If you already know how to use RStudio and want to learn some tips, tricks, and shortcuts, check out this Dataquest blog post.

Table of Contents

#data science tutorials #beginner #r tutorial #r tutorials #rstats #tutorial #tutorials

Iliana  Welch

Iliana Welch

1597368540

Docker Tutorial for Beginners 8 - Build and Run C++ Applications in a Docker Container

Docker is an open platform that allows use package, develop, run, and ship software applications in different environments using containers.
In this course We will learn How to Write Dockerfiles, Working with the Docker Toolbox, How to Work with the Docker Machine, How to Use Docker Compose to fire up multiple containers, How to Work with Docker Kinematic, Push images to Docker Hub, Pull images from a Docker Registery, Push stacks of servers to Docker Hub.
How to install Docker on Mac.

#docker tutorial #c++ #docker container #docker #docker hub #devopstools

Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1659453850

Twitter.jl: Julia Package to Access Twitter API

Twitter.jl

A Julia package for interacting with the Twitter API.

Twitter.jl is a Julia package to work with the Twitter API v1.1. Currently, only the REST API methods are supported; streaming API endpoints aren't implemented at this time.

All functions have required arguments for those parameters required by Twitter and an options keyword argument to provide a Dict{String, String} of optional parameters Twitter API documentation. Most function calls will return either a Dict or an Array <: TwitterType. Bad requests will return the response code from the API (403, 404, etc).

DataFrame methods are defined for functions returning composite types: Tweets, Places, Lists, and Users.

Authentication

Before one can make use of this package, you must create an application on the Twitter's Developer Platform.

Once your application is approved, you can access your dashboard/portal to grab your authentication credentials from the "Details" tab of the application.

Note that you will also want to ensure that your App has Read / Write OAuth access in order to post tweets. You can find out more about this on Stack Overflow.

Installation

To install this package, enter ] on the REPL to bring up Julia's package manager. Then add the package:

julia> ]
(v1.7) pkg> add Twitter

Tip: Press Ctrl+C to return to the julia> prompt.

Usage

To run Twitter.jl, enter the following command in your Julia REPL

julia> using Twitter

Then the a global variable has to be declared with the twitterauth function. This function holds the consumer_key(API Key), consumer_secret(API Key Secret), oauth_token(Access Token), and oauth_secret(Access Token Secret) respectively.

twitterauth("6nOtpXmf...", # API Key
            "sES5Zlj096S...", # API Key Secret
            "98689850-Hj...", # Access Token
            "UroqCVpWKIt...") # Access Token Secret
  • Ensure you put your credentials in an env file to avoid pushing your secrets to the public 🙀.

Note: This package does not currently support OAuth authentication.

Code examples

See runtests.jl for example function calls.

using Twitter, Test
using JSON, OAuth

# set debugging
ENV["JULIA_DEBUG"]=Twitter

twitterauth(ENV["CONSUMER_KEY"], ENV["CONSUMER_SECRET"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN"], ENV["ACCESS_TOKEN_SECRET"])

#get_mentions_timeline
mentions_timeline_default = get_mentions_timeline()
tw = mentions_timeline_default[1]
tw_df = DataFrame(mentions_timeline_default)
@test 0 <= length(mentions_timeline_default) <= 20
@test typeof(mentions_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}
@test typeof(tw) == Tweets
@test size(tw_df)[2] == 30

#get_user_timeline
user_timeline_default = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "randyzwitch")
@test typeof(user_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_home_timeline
home_timeline_default = get_home_timeline()
@test typeof(home_timeline_default) == Vector{Tweets}

#get_single_tweet_id
get_tweet_by_id = get_single_tweet_id(id = "434685122671939584")
@test typeof(get_tweet_by_id) == Tweets

#get_search_tweets
duke_tweets = get_search_tweets(q = "#Duke", count = 200)
@test typeof(duke_tweets) <: Dict

#test sending/deleting direct messages
#commenting out because Twitter API changed. Come back to fix
# send_dm = post_direct_messages_send(text = "Testing from Julia, this might disappear later $(time())", screen_name = "randyzwitch")
# get_single_dm = get_direct_messages_show(id = send_dm.id)
# destroy = post_direct_messages_destroy(id = send_dm.id)
# @test typeof(send_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(get_single_dm) == Tweets
# @test typeof(destroy) == Tweets

#creating/destroying friendships
add_friend = post_friendships_create(screen_name = "kyrieirving")

unfollow = post_friendships_destroy(screen_name = "kyrieirving")
unfollow_df = DataFrame(unfollow)
@test typeof(add_friend) == Users
@test typeof(unfollow) == Users
@test size(unfollow_df)[2] == 40

# create a cursor for follower ids
follow_cursor_test = get_followers_ids(screen_name = "twitter", count = 10_000)
@test length(follow_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a cursor for friend ids - use barackobama because he follows a lot of accounts!
friend_cursor_test = get_friends_ids(screen_name = "BarackObama", count = 10_000)
@test length(friend_cursor_test["ids"]) == 10_000

# create a test for home timelines
home_t = get_home_timeline(count = 2)
@test length(home_t) > 1

# TEST of cursoring functionality on user timelines
user_t = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400)
@test length(user_t) == 400
# get the minimum ID of the tweets returned (the earliest)
minid = minimum(x.id for x in user_t);

# now iterate until you hit that tweet: should return 399
# WARNING: current versions of julia cannot use keywords in macros? read here: https://github.com/JuliaLang/julia/pull/29261
# eventually replace since_id = minid
tweets_since = get_user_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 400, since_id = 1001808621053898752, include_rts=1)

@test length(tweets_since)>=399

# testing get_mentions_timeline
mentions = get_mentions_timeline(screen_name = "stefanjwojcik", count = 300) 
@test length(mentions) >= 50 #sometimes API doesn't return number requested (twitter API specifies count is the max returned, may be much lower)
@test Tweets<:typeof(mentions[1])

# testing retweets_of_me
my_rts = get_retweets_of_me(count = 300)
@test Tweets<:typeof(my_rts[1])

Want to contribute?

Contributions are welcome! Kindly refer to the contribution guidelines.

Linux: Build Status 

CodeCov: codecov

Author: Randyzwitch
Source Code: https://github.com/randyzwitch/Twitter.jl 
License: View license

#julia #api #twitter