Using Typescript with Modern React (i.e. Hooks, Context, Suspense)

Adding TypeScript to a modern React project with Hooks (useState, useContext, useEffect) and code splitting with lazy.

In this course you will learn how to add typescript to a create-react-app project as well as adding it to a react project from scratch with webpack and babel. You will learn a bit about react hooks, (useState, useContext, useReducer and useEffect), in a react typescript project as well as using suspense to lazy load a component. We will also attempt to recreate redux, (or the redux principles) with useReducer and Context.

This course is at an intermediate/advance level and assumes you have used React and Redux before, however you don't need to know any typescript for this.

What you’ll learn:

  • How to use Typescript with their modern React project
  • Understand how to set up typescript with create-react-app as well as babel and webpack
  • Feel comfortable using hooks for state and lifecycle
  • Are there any course requirements or prerequisites?
  • Have a basic understanding of Javascript and React
  • Be comfortable using the terminal or command prompt

#typescript #react #javascript #webdev 

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Using Typescript with Modern React (i.e. Hooks, Context, Suspense)
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

What are hooks in React JS? - INFO AT ONE

In this article, you will learn what are hooks in React JS? and when to use react hooks? React JS is developed by Facebook in the year 2013. There are many students and the new developers who have confusion between react and hooks in react. Well, it is not different, react is a programming language and hooks is a function which is used in react programming language.
Read More:- https://infoatone.com/what-are-hooks-in-react-js/

#react #hooks in react #react hooks example #react js projects for beginners #what are hooks in react js? #when to use react hooks

Using Typescript with Modern React (i.e. Hooks, Context, Suspense)

Adding TypeScript to a modern React project with Hooks (useState, useContext, useEffect) and code splitting with lazy.

In this course you will learn how to add typescript to a create-react-app project as well as adding it to a react project from scratch with webpack and babel. You will learn a bit about react hooks, (useState, useContext, useReducer and useEffect), in a react typescript project as well as using suspense to lazy load a component. We will also attempt to recreate redux, (or the redux principles) with useReducer and Context.

This course is at an intermediate/advance level and assumes you have used React and Redux before, however you don't need to know any typescript for this.

What you’ll learn:

  • How to use Typescript with their modern React project
  • Understand how to set up typescript with create-react-app as well as babel and webpack
  • Feel comfortable using hooks for state and lifecycle
  • Are there any course requirements or prerequisites?
  • Have a basic understanding of Javascript and React
  • Be comfortable using the terminal or command prompt

#typescript #react #javascript #webdev 

Verdie  Murray

Verdie Murray

1636236360

How to add Cypress for Create React App with TypeScript

In this lesson we look at how to add #cypress with code coverage support for a Create #React App application with #TypeScript.

In the end you will have a developer flow that can save you a bunch of time in testing effort 

#react-native #react #cypress #typescript 

Juana  O'Keefe

Juana O'Keefe

1602571080

Persist and Remember Page Scroll Position, i.e. window.scrollY Using React Hooks

This post is mirrored on my blog, chrisfrew.in.

In a recent project, I was tasked with maintaining scroll position between pages. At first, I was certain the solution would have to be a complex one, where we would have to listen to scroll event listeners (always a critical task in terms of performance and efficiency), and share a complex state of various page scroll positions (the value of window.scrollY) for everything to work properly.

In the end, leveraging both localStorage and some advanced abilities of React hooks resulted in a rather elegant solution.

I’m happy to share it with you.

Let’s go!

Requirements

  1. First, we need to remember the window.scrollY value per page - this can be solved with localStorage. We’ll pass a page key to identify which localStorage variable has the scrollY value we need to rehydrate.
  2. We only need to store the scroll position when the user leaves that page. This is where I realized that there was no event listener required. No need to listen to the scroll event to complete this functionality! (Already a huge plus). The ‘trick’, if you will, is leveraging React’s useEffect return value, which can be a function, i.e., a useEffect call can have the following form:
useEffect(() => {
    // ...some effect code here...
    return () => {
        // this code fires on unmount! Perfect for our use case!
    }
})
  1. Finally, and maybe the most tricky one: we should only rehydrate the page scroll position after the full content for the page has loaded. For example, if we are loading a bunch of tiles or pictures (or anything really that ends up in the DOM) from an async process, we wait to make sure that data is set in the DOM before restoring our scrollY position. Therefore, our hook should also be able to accept a parameter which is boolean type. I called it setCondition. We’ll only call window.scrollTo if that setCondition variable is true.

#typescript #software-development #javascript #react #react-hook #react native