Carmen  Grimes

Carmen Grimes

1609223103

Setting up Cron Jobs in Deno

In this short guide, you can learn what a cron job is and how to set up cron jobs in Deno to automate tasks.

Automation can save time by improving and streamlining processes and repetitive tasks. In a unix-like system, you can automate tasks using cron jobs.

What is a cron job?

A cron job is a unix term for a system process (cron) that allows you to schedule tasks to run at a later date under a specified set of privileges. Essentially, it’s a scheduler that enables applications to schedule a job to run automatically at a certain date or time. In this article, we’ll integrate a cron job into a Deno application.

#deno #javascript #typescript #developer #programming

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Setting up Cron Jobs in Deno
Hermann  Frami

Hermann Frami

1651383480

A Simple Wrapper Around Amplify AppSync Simulator

This serverless plugin is a wrapper for amplify-appsync-simulator made for testing AppSync APIs built with serverless-appsync-plugin.

Install

npm install serverless-appsync-simulator
# or
yarn add serverless-appsync-simulator

Usage

This plugin relies on your serverless yml file and on the serverless-offline plugin.

plugins:
  - serverless-dynamodb-local # only if you need dynamodb resolvers and you don't have an external dynamodb
  - serverless-appsync-simulator
  - serverless-offline

Note: Order is important serverless-appsync-simulator must go before serverless-offline

To start the simulator, run the following command:

sls offline start

You should see in the logs something like:

...
Serverless: AppSync endpoint: http://localhost:20002/graphql
Serverless: GraphiQl: http://localhost:20002
...

Configuration

Put options under custom.appsync-simulator in your serverless.yml file

| option | default | description | | ------------------------ | -------------------------- | ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- | --------- | | apiKey | 0123456789 | When using API_KEY as authentication type, the key to authenticate to the endpoint. | | port | 20002 | AppSync operations port; if using multiple APIs, the value of this option will be used as a starting point, and each other API will have a port of lastPort + 10 (e.g. 20002, 20012, 20022, etc.) | | wsPort | 20003 | AppSync subscriptions port; if using multiple APIs, the value of this option will be used as a starting point, and each other API will have a port of lastPort + 10 (e.g. 20003, 20013, 20023, etc.) | | location | . (base directory) | Location of the lambda functions handlers. | | refMap | {} | A mapping of resource resolutions for the Ref function | | getAttMap | {} | A mapping of resource resolutions for the GetAtt function | | importValueMap | {} | A mapping of resource resolutions for the ImportValue function | | functions | {} | A mapping of external functions for providing invoke url for external fucntions | | dynamoDb.endpoint | http://localhost:8000 | Dynamodb endpoint. Specify it if you're not using serverless-dynamodb-local. Otherwise, port is taken from dynamodb-local conf | | dynamoDb.region | localhost | Dynamodb region. Specify it if you're connecting to a remote Dynamodb intance. | | dynamoDb.accessKeyId | DEFAULT_ACCESS_KEY | AWS Access Key ID to access DynamoDB | | dynamoDb.secretAccessKey | DEFAULT_SECRET | AWS Secret Key to access DynamoDB | | dynamoDb.sessionToken | DEFAULT_ACCESS_TOKEEN | AWS Session Token to access DynamoDB, only if you have temporary security credentials configured on AWS | | dynamoDb.* | | You can add every configuration accepted by DynamoDB SDK | | rds.dbName | | Name of the database | | rds.dbHost | | Database host | | rds.dbDialect | | Database dialect. Possible values (mysql | postgres) | | rds.dbUsername | | Database username | | rds.dbPassword | | Database password | | rds.dbPort | | Database port | | watch | - *.graphql
- *.vtl | Array of glob patterns to watch for hot-reloading. |

Example:

custom:
  appsync-simulator:
    location: '.webpack/service' # use webpack build directory
    dynamoDb:
      endpoint: 'http://my-custom-dynamo:8000'

Hot-reloading

By default, the simulator will hot-relad when changes to *.graphql or *.vtl files are detected. Changes to *.yml files are not supported (yet? - this is a Serverless Framework limitation). You will need to restart the simulator each time you change yml files.

Hot-reloading relies on watchman. Make sure it is installed on your system.

You can change the files being watched with the watch option, which is then passed to watchman as the match expression.

e.g.

custom:
  appsync-simulator:
    watch:
      - ["match", "handlers/**/*.vtl", "wholename"] # => array is interpreted as the literal match expression
      - "*.graphql"                                 # => string like this is equivalent to `["match", "*.graphql"]`

Or you can opt-out by leaving an empty array or set the option to false

Note: Functions should not require hot-reloading, unless you are using a transpiler or a bundler (such as webpack, babel or typescript), un which case you should delegate hot-reloading to that instead.

Resource CloudFormation functions resolution

This plugin supports some resources resolution from the Ref, Fn::GetAtt and Fn::ImportValue functions in your yaml file. It also supports some other Cfn functions such as Fn::Join, Fb::Sub, etc.

Note: Under the hood, this features relies on the cfn-resolver-lib package. For more info on supported cfn functions, refer to the documentation

Basic usage

You can reference resources in your functions' environment variables (that will be accessible from your lambda functions) or datasource definitions. The plugin will automatically resolve them for you.

provider:
  environment:
    BUCKET_NAME:
      Ref: MyBucket # resolves to `my-bucket-name`

resources:
  Resources:
    MyDbTable:
      Type: AWS::DynamoDB::Table
      Properties:
        TableName: myTable
      ...
    MyBucket:
      Type: AWS::S3::Bucket
      Properties:
        BucketName: my-bucket-name
    ...

# in your appsync config
dataSources:
  - type: AMAZON_DYNAMODB
    name: dynamosource
    config:
      tableName:
        Ref: MyDbTable # resolves to `myTable`

Override (or mock) values

Sometimes, some references cannot be resolved, as they come from an Output from Cloudformation; or you might want to use mocked values in your local environment.

In those cases, you can define (or override) those values using the refMap, getAttMap and importValueMap options.

  • refMap takes a mapping of resource name to value pairs
  • getAttMap takes a mapping of resource name to attribute/values pairs
  • importValueMap takes a mapping of import name to values pairs

Example:

custom:
  appsync-simulator:
    refMap:
      # Override `MyDbTable` resolution from the previous example.
      MyDbTable: 'mock-myTable'
    getAttMap:
      # define ElasticSearchInstance DomainName
      ElasticSearchInstance:
        DomainEndpoint: 'localhost:9200'
    importValueMap:
      other-service-api-url: 'https://other.api.url.com/graphql'

# in your appsync config
dataSources:
  - type: AMAZON_ELASTICSEARCH
    name: elasticsource
    config:
      # endpoint resolves as 'http://localhost:9200'
      endpoint:
        Fn::Join:
          - ''
          - - https://
            - Fn::GetAtt:
                - ElasticSearchInstance
                - DomainEndpoint

Key-value mock notation

In some special cases you will need to use key-value mock nottation. Good example can be case when you need to include serverless stage value (${self:provider.stage}) in the import name.

This notation can be used with all mocks - refMap, getAttMap and importValueMap

provider:
  environment:
    FINISH_ACTIVITY_FUNCTION_ARN:
      Fn::ImportValue: other-service-api-${self:provider.stage}-url

custom:
  serverless-appsync-simulator:
    importValueMap:
      - key: other-service-api-${self:provider.stage}-url
        value: 'https://other.api.url.com/graphql'

Limitations

This plugin only tries to resolve the following parts of the yml tree:

  • provider.environment
  • functions[*].environment
  • custom.appSync

If you have the need of resolving others, feel free to open an issue and explain your use case.

For now, the supported resources to be automatically resovled by Ref: are:

  • DynamoDb tables
  • S3 Buckets

Feel free to open a PR or an issue to extend them as well.

External functions

When a function is not defined withing the current serverless file you can still call it by providing an invoke url which should point to a REST method. Make sure you specify "get" or "post" for the method. Default is "get", but you probably want "post".

custom:
  appsync-simulator:
    functions:
      addUser:
        url: http://localhost:3016/2015-03-31/functions/addUser/invocations
        method: post
      addPost:
        url: https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/posts
        method: post

Supported Resolver types

This plugin supports resolvers implemented by amplify-appsync-simulator, as well as custom resolvers.

From Aws Amplify:

  • NONE
  • AWS_LAMBDA
  • AMAZON_DYNAMODB
  • PIPELINE

Implemented by this plugin

  • AMAZON_ELASTIC_SEARCH
  • HTTP
  • RELATIONAL_DATABASE

Relational Database

Sample VTL for a create mutation

#set( $cols = [] )
#set( $vals = [] )
#foreach( $entry in $ctx.args.input.keySet() )
  #set( $regex = "([a-z])([A-Z]+)")
  #set( $replacement = "$1_$2")
  #set( $toSnake = $entry.replaceAll($regex, $replacement).toLowerCase() )
  #set( $discard = $cols.add("$toSnake") )
  #if( $util.isBoolean($ctx.args.input[$entry]) )
      #if( $ctx.args.input[$entry] )
        #set( $discard = $vals.add("1") )
      #else
        #set( $discard = $vals.add("0") )
      #end
  #else
      #set( $discard = $vals.add("'$ctx.args.input[$entry]'") )
  #end
#end
#set( $valStr = $vals.toString().replace("[","(").replace("]",")") )
#set( $colStr = $cols.toString().replace("[","(").replace("]",")") )
#if ( $valStr.substring(0, 1) != '(' )
  #set( $valStr = "($valStr)" )
#end
#if ( $colStr.substring(0, 1) != '(' )
  #set( $colStr = "($colStr)" )
#end
{
  "version": "2018-05-29",
  "statements":   ["INSERT INTO <name-of-table> $colStr VALUES $valStr", "SELECT * FROM    <name-of-table> ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT 1"]
}

Sample VTL for an update mutation

#set( $update = "" )
#set( $equals = "=" )
#foreach( $entry in $ctx.args.input.keySet() )
  #set( $cur = $ctx.args.input[$entry] )
  #set( $regex = "([a-z])([A-Z]+)")
  #set( $replacement = "$1_$2")
  #set( $toSnake = $entry.replaceAll($regex, $replacement).toLowerCase() )
  #if( $util.isBoolean($cur) )
      #if( $cur )
        #set ( $cur = "1" )
      #else
        #set ( $cur = "0" )
      #end
  #end
  #if ( $util.isNullOrEmpty($update) )
      #set($update = "$toSnake$equals'$cur'" )
  #else
      #set($update = "$update,$toSnake$equals'$cur'" )
  #end
#end
{
  "version": "2018-05-29",
  "statements":   ["UPDATE <name-of-table> SET $update WHERE id=$ctx.args.input.id", "SELECT * FROM <name-of-table> WHERE id=$ctx.args.input.id"]
}

Sample resolver for delete mutation

{
  "version": "2018-05-29",
  "statements":   ["UPDATE <name-of-table> set deleted_at=NOW() WHERE id=$ctx.args.id", "SELECT * FROM <name-of-table> WHERE id=$ctx.args.id"]
}

Sample mutation response VTL with support for handling AWSDateTime

#set ( $index = -1)
#set ( $result = $util.parseJson($ctx.result) )
#set ( $meta = $result.sqlStatementResults[1].columnMetadata)
#foreach ($column in $meta)
    #set ($index = $index + 1)
    #if ( $column["typeName"] == "timestamptz" )
        #set ($time = $result["sqlStatementResults"][1]["records"][0][$index]["stringValue"] )
        #set ( $nowEpochMillis = $util.time.parseFormattedToEpochMilliSeconds("$time.substring(0,19)+0000", "yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ssZ") )
        #set ( $isoDateTime = $util.time.epochMilliSecondsToISO8601($nowEpochMillis) )
        $util.qr( $result["sqlStatementResults"][1]["records"][0][$index].put("stringValue", "$isoDateTime") )
    #end
#end
#set ( $res = $util.parseJson($util.rds.toJsonString($util.toJson($result)))[1][0] )
#set ( $response = {} )
#foreach($mapKey in $res.keySet())
    #set ( $s = $mapKey.split("_") )
    #set ( $camelCase="" )
    #set ( $isFirst=true )
    #foreach($entry in $s)
        #if ( $isFirst )
          #set ( $first = $entry.substring(0,1) )
        #else
          #set ( $first = $entry.substring(0,1).toUpperCase() )
        #end
        #set ( $isFirst=false )
        #set ( $stringLength = $entry.length() )
        #set ( $remaining = $entry.substring(1, $stringLength) )
        #set ( $camelCase = "$camelCase$first$remaining" )
    #end
    $util.qr( $response.put("$camelCase", $res[$mapKey]) )
#end
$utils.toJson($response)

Using Variable Map

Variable map support is limited and does not differentiate numbers and strings data types, please inject them directly if needed.

Will be escaped properly: null, true, and false values.

{
  "version": "2018-05-29",
  "statements":   [
    "UPDATE <name-of-table> set deleted_at=NOW() WHERE id=:ID",
    "SELECT * FROM <name-of-table> WHERE id=:ID and unix_timestamp > $ctx.args.newerThan"
  ],
  variableMap: {
    ":ID": $ctx.args.id,
##    ":TIMESTAMP": $ctx.args.newerThan -- This will be handled as a string!!!
  }
}

Requires

Author: Serverless-appsync
Source Code: https://github.com/serverless-appsync/serverless-appsync-simulator 
License: MIT License

#serverless #sync #graphql 

Hermann  Frami

Hermann Frami

1651319520

Serverless APIGateway Service Proxy

Serverless APIGateway Service Proxy

This Serverless Framework plugin supports the AWS service proxy integration feature of API Gateway. You can directly connect API Gateway to AWS services without Lambda.

Install

Run serverless plugin install in your Serverless project.

serverless plugin install -n serverless-apigateway-service-proxy

Supported AWS services

Here is a services list which this plugin supports for now. But will expand to other services in the feature. Please pull request if you are intersted in it.

  • Kinesis Streams
  • SQS
  • S3
  • SNS
  • DynamoDB
  • EventBridge

How to use

Define settings of the AWS services you want to integrate under custom > apiGatewayServiceProxies and run serverless deploy.

Kinesis

Sample syntax for Kinesis proxy in serverless.yml.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis: # partitionkey is set apigateway requestid by default
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        partitionKey: 'hardcordedkey' # use static partitionkey
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis/{myKey} # use path parameter
        method: post
        partitionKey:
          pathParam: myKey
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        partitionKey:
          bodyParam: data.myKey # use body parameter
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        partitionKey:
          queryStringParam: myKey # use query string param
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true
    - kinesis: # PutRecords
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        action: PutRecords
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    YourStream:
      Type: AWS::Kinesis::Stream
      Properties:
        ShardCount: 1

Sample request after deploying.

curl https://xxxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/kinesis -d '{"message": "some data"}'  -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

SQS

Sample syntax for SQS proxy in serverless.yml.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /sqs
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SQSQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    SQSQueue:
      Type: 'AWS::SQS::Queue'

Sample request after deploying.

curl https://xxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/sqs -d '{"message": "testtest"}' -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

Customizing request parameters

If you'd like to pass additional data to the integration request, you can do so by including your custom API Gateway request parameters in serverless.yml like so:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /queue
        method: post
        queueName: !GetAtt MyQueue.QueueName
        cors: true

        requestParameters:
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Name': "'cognitoIdentityId'"
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Value.StringValue': 'context.identity.cognitoIdentityId'
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Value.DataType': "'String'"
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.2.Name': "'cognitoAuthenticationProvider'"
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.2.Value.StringValue': 'context.identity.cognitoAuthenticationProvider'
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.2.Value.DataType': "'String'"

The alternative way to pass MessageAttribute parameters is via a request body mapping template.

Customizing request body mapping templates

See the SQS section under Customizing request body mapping templates

Customizing responses

Simplified response template customization

You can get a simple customization of the responses by providing a template for the possible responses. The template is assumed to be application/json.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /queue
        method: post
        queueName: !GetAtt MyQueue.QueueName
        cors: true
        response:
          template:
            # `success` is used when the integration response is 200
            success: |-
              { "message: "accepted" }
            # `clientError` is used when the integration response is 400
            clientError: |-
              { "message": "there is an error in your request" }
            # `serverError` is used when the integration response is 500
            serverError: |-
              { "message": "there was an error handling your request" }

Full response customization

If you want more control over the integration response, you can provide an array of objects for the response value:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /queue
        method: post
        queueName: !GetAtt MyQueue.QueueName
        cors: true
        response:
          - statusCode: 200
            selectionPattern: '2\\d{2}'
            responseParameters: {}
            responseTemplates:
              application/json: |-
                { "message": "accepted" }

The object keys correspond to the API Gateway integration response object.

S3

Sample syntax for S3 proxy in serverless.yml.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3
        method: post
        action: PutObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        key: static-key.json # use static key
        cors: true

    - s3:
        path: /s3/{myKey} # use path param
        method: get
        action: GetObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        key:
          pathParam: myKey
        cors: true

    - s3:
        path: /s3
        method: delete
        action: DeleteObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        key:
          queryStringParam: key # use query string param
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    S3Bucket:
      Type: 'AWS::S3::Bucket'

Sample request after deploying.

curl https://xxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/s3 -d '{"message": "testtest"}' -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

Customizing request parameters

Similar to the SQS support, you can customize the default request parameters serverless.yml like so:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3
        method: post
        action: PutObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        cors: true

        requestParameters:
          # if requestParameters has a 'integration.request.path.object' property you should remove the key setting
          'integration.request.path.object': 'context.requestId'
          'integration.request.header.cache-control': "'public, max-age=31536000, immutable'"

Customizing request templates

If you'd like use custom API Gateway request templates, you can do so like so:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3
        method: get
        action: GetObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        request:
          template:
            application/json: |
              #set ($specialStuff = $context.request.header.x-special)
              #set ($context.requestOverride.path.object = $specialStuff.replaceAll('_', '-'))
              {}

Note that if the client does not provide a Content-Type header in the request, ApiGateway defaults to application/json.

Customize the Path Override in API Gateway

Added the new customization parameter that lets the user set a custom Path Override in API Gateway other than the {bucket}/{object} This parameter is optional and if not set, will fall back to {bucket}/{object} The Path Override will add {bucket}/ automatically in front

Please keep in mind, that key or path.object still needs to be set at the moment (maybe this will be made optional later on with this)

Usage (With 2 Path Parameters (folder and file and a fixed file extension)):

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3/{folder}/{file}
        method: get
        action: GetObject
        pathOverride: '{folder}/{file}.xml'
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        cors: true

        requestParameters:
          # if requestParameters has a 'integration.request.path.object' property you should remove the key setting
          'integration.request.path.folder': 'method.request.path.folder'
          'integration.request.path.file': 'method.request.path.file'
          'integration.request.path.object': 'context.requestId'
          'integration.request.header.cache-control': "'public, max-age=31536000, immutable'"

This will result in API Gateway setting the Path Override attribute to {bucket}/{folder}/{file}.xml So for example if you navigate to the API Gatway endpoint /language/en it will fetch the file in S3 from {bucket}/language/en.xml

Can use greedy, for deeper Folders

The forementioned example can also be shortened by a greedy approach. Thanks to @taylorreece for mentioning this.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3/{myPath+}
        method: get
        action: GetObject
        pathOverride: '{myPath}.xml'
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        cors: true

        requestParameters:
          # if requestParameters has a 'integration.request.path.object' property you should remove the key setting
          'integration.request.path.myPath': 'method.request.path.myPath'
          'integration.request.path.object': 'context.requestId'
          'integration.request.header.cache-control': "'public, max-age=31536000, immutable'"

This will translate for example /s3/a/b/c to a/b/c.xml

Customizing responses

You can get a simple customization of the responses by providing a template for the possible responses. The template is assumed to be application/json.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - s3:
        path: /s3
        method: post
        action: PutObject
        bucket:
          Ref: S3Bucket
        key: static-key.json
        response:
          template:
            # `success` is used when the integration response is 200
            success: |-
              { "message: "accepted" }
            # `clientError` is used when the integration response is 400
            clientError: |-
              { "message": "there is an error in your request" }
            # `serverError` is used when the integration response is 500
            serverError: |-
              { "message": "there was an error handling your request" }

SNS

Sample syntax for SNS proxy in serverless.yml.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sns:
        path: /sns
        method: post
        topicName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SNSTopic', 'TopicName'] }
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    SNSTopic:
      Type: AWS::SNS::Topic

Sample request after deploying.

curl https://xxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/sns -d '{"message": "testtest"}' -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

Customizing responses

Simplified response template customization

You can get a simple customization of the responses by providing a template for the possible responses. The template is assumed to be application/json.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sns:
        path: /sns
        method: post
        topicName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SNSTopic', 'TopicName'] }
        cors: true
        response:
          template:
            # `success` is used when the integration response is 200
            success: |-
              { "message: "accepted" }
            # `clientError` is used when the integration response is 400
            clientError: |-
              { "message": "there is an error in your request" }
            # `serverError` is used when the integration response is 500
            serverError: |-
              { "message": "there was an error handling your request" }

Full response customization

If you want more control over the integration response, you can provide an array of objects for the response value:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sns:
        path: /sns
        method: post
        topicName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SNSTopic', 'TopicName'] }
        cors: true
        response:
          - statusCode: 200
            selectionPattern: '2\d{2}'
            responseParameters: {}
            responseTemplates:
              application/json: |-
                { "message": "accepted" }

The object keys correspond to the API Gateway integration response object.

Content Handling and Pass Through Behaviour customization

If you want to work with binary fata, you can not specify contentHandling and PassThrough inside the request object.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sns:
        path: /sns
        method: post
        topicName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SNSTopic', 'TopicName'] }
        request:
          contentHandling: CONVERT_TO_TEXT
          passThrough: WHEN_NO_TEMPLATES

The allowed values correspond with the API Gateway Method integration for ContentHandling and PassthroughBehavior

DynamoDB

Sample syntax for DynamoDB proxy in serverless.yml. Currently, the supported DynamoDB Operations are PutItem, GetItem and DeleteItem.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - dynamodb:
        path: /dynamodb/{id}/{sort}
        method: put
        tableName: { Ref: 'YourTable' }
        hashKey: # set pathParam or queryStringParam as a partitionkey.
          pathParam: id
          attributeType: S
        rangeKey: # required if also using sort key. set pathParam or queryStringParam.
          pathParam: sort
          attributeType: S
        action: PutItem # specify action to the table what you want
        condition: attribute_not_exists(Id) # optional Condition Expressions parameter for the table
        cors: true
    - dynamodb:
        path: /dynamodb
        method: get
        tableName: { Ref: 'YourTable' }
        hashKey:
          queryStringParam: id # use query string parameter
          attributeType: S
        rangeKey:
          queryStringParam: sort
          attributeType: S
        action: GetItem
        cors: true
    - dynamodb:
        path: /dynamodb/{id}
        method: delete
        tableName: { Ref: 'YourTable' }
        hashKey:
          pathParam: id
          attributeType: S
        action: DeleteItem
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    YourTable:
      Type: AWS::DynamoDB::Table
      Properties:
        TableName: YourTable
        AttributeDefinitions:
          - AttributeName: id
            AttributeType: S
          - AttributeName: sort
            AttributeType: S
        KeySchema:
          - AttributeName: id
            KeyType: HASH
          - AttributeName: sort
            KeyType: RANGE
        ProvisionedThroughput:
          ReadCapacityUnits: 1
          WriteCapacityUnits: 1

Sample request after deploying.

curl -XPUT https://xxxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/dynamodb/<hashKey>/<sortkey> \
 -d '{"name":{"S":"john"},"address":{"S":"xxxxx"}}' \
 -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

EventBridge

Sample syntax for EventBridge proxy in serverless.yml.

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - eventbridge:  # source and detailType are hardcoded; detail defaults to POST body
        path: /eventbridge
        method: post
        source: 'hardcoded_source'
        detailType: 'hardcoded_detailType'
        eventBusName: { Ref: 'YourBusName' }
        cors: true
    - eventbridge:  # source and detailType as path parameters
        path: /eventbridge/{detailTypeKey}/{sourceKey}
        method: post
        detailType:
          pathParam: detailTypeKey
        source:
          pathParam: sourceKey
        eventBusName: { Ref: 'YourBusName' }
        cors: true
    - eventbridge:  # source, detail, and detailType as body parameters
        path: /eventbridge/{detailTypeKey}/{sourceKey}
        method: post
        detailType:
          bodyParam: data.detailType
        source:
          bodyParam: data.source
        detail:
          bodyParam: data.detail
        eventBusName: { Ref: 'YourBusName' }
        cors: true

resources:
  Resources:
    YourBus:
      Type: AWS::Events::EventBus
      Properties:
        Name: YourEventBus

Sample request after deploying.

curl https://xxxxxxx.execute-api.us-east-1.amazonaws.com/dev/eventbridge -d '{"message": "some data"}'  -H 'Content-Type:application/json'

Common API Gateway features

Enabling CORS

To set CORS configurations for your HTTP endpoints, simply modify your event configurations as follows:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors: true

Setting cors to true assumes a default configuration which is equivalent to:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors:
          origin: '*'
          headers:
            - Content-Type
            - X-Amz-Date
            - Authorization
            - X-Api-Key
            - X-Amz-Security-Token
            - X-Amz-User-Agent
          allowCredentials: false

Configuring the cors property sets Access-Control-Allow-Origin, Access-Control-Allow-Headers, Access-Control-Allow-Methods,Access-Control-Allow-Credentials headers in the CORS preflight response. To enable the Access-Control-Max-Age preflight response header, set the maxAge property in the cors object:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors:
          origin: '*'
          maxAge: 86400

If you are using CloudFront or another CDN for your API Gateway, you may want to setup a Cache-Control header to allow for OPTIONS request to be cached to avoid the additional hop.

To enable the Cache-Control header on preflight response, set the cacheControl property in the cors object:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'YourStream' }
        cors:
          origin: '*'
          headers:
            - Content-Type
            - X-Amz-Date
            - Authorization
            - X-Api-Key
            - X-Amz-Security-Token
            - X-Amz-User-Agent
          allowCredentials: false
          cacheControl: 'max-age=600, s-maxage=600, proxy-revalidate' # Caches on browser and proxy for 10 minutes and doesnt allow proxy to serve out of date content

Adding Authorization

You can pass in any supported authorization type:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /sqs
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SQSQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        cors: true

        # optional - defaults to 'NONE'
        authorizationType: 'AWS_IAM' # can be one of ['NONE', 'AWS_IAM', 'CUSTOM', 'COGNITO_USER_POOLS']

        # when using 'CUSTOM' authorization type, one should specify authorizerId
        # authorizerId: { Ref: 'AuthorizerLogicalId' }
        # when using 'COGNITO_USER_POOLS' authorization type, one can specify a list of authorization scopes
        # authorizationScopes: ['scope1','scope2']

resources:
  Resources:
    SQSQueue:
      Type: 'AWS::SQS::Queue'

Source: AWS::ApiGateway::Method docs

Enabling API Token Authentication

You can indicate whether the method requires clients to submit a valid API key using private flag:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /sqs
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SQSQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        cors: true
        private: true

resources:
  Resources:
    SQSQueue:
      Type: 'AWS::SQS::Queue'

which is the same syntax used in Serverless framework.

Source: Serverless: Setting API keys for your Rest API

Source: AWS::ApiGateway::Method docs

Using a Custom IAM Role

By default, the plugin will generate a role with the required permissions for each service type that is configured.

You can configure your own role by setting the roleArn attribute:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /sqs
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SQSQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        cors: true
        roleArn: # Optional. A default role is created when not configured
          Fn::GetAtt: [CustomS3Role, Arn]

resources:
  Resources:
    SQSQueue:
      Type: 'AWS::SQS::Queue'
    CustomS3Role:
      # Custom Role definition
      Type: 'AWS::IAM::Role'

Customizing API Gateway parameters

The plugin allows one to specify which parameters the API Gateway method accepts.

A common use case is to pass custom data to the integration request:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /sqs
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SqsQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        cors: true
        acceptParameters:
          'method.request.header.Custom-Header': true
        requestParameters:
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Name': "'custom-Header'"
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Value.StringValue': 'method.request.header.Custom-Header'
          'integration.request.querystring.MessageAttribute.1.Value.DataType': "'String'"
resources:
  Resources:
    SqsQueue:
      Type: 'AWS::SQS::Queue'

Any published SQS message will have the Custom-Header value added as a message attribute.

Customizing request body mapping templates

Kinesis

If you'd like to add content types or customize the default templates, you can do so by including your custom API Gateway request mapping template in serverless.yml like so:

# Required for using Fn::Sub
plugins:
  - serverless-cloudformation-sub-variables

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'MyStream' }
        request:
          template:
            text/plain:
              Fn::Sub:
                - |
                  #set($msgBody = $util.parseJson($input.body))
                  #set($msgId = $msgBody.MessageId)
                  {
                      "Data": "$util.base64Encode($input.body)",
                      "PartitionKey": "$msgId",
                      "StreamName": "#{MyStreamArn}"
                  }
                - MyStreamArn:
                    Fn::GetAtt: [MyStream, Arn]

It is important that the mapping template will return a valid application/json string

Source: How to connect SNS to Kinesis for cross-account delivery via API Gateway

SQS

Customizing SQS request templates requires us to force all requests to use an application/x-www-form-urlencoded style body. The plugin sets the Content-Type header to application/x-www-form-urlencoded for you, but API Gateway will still look for the template under the application/json request template type, so that is where you need to configure you request body in serverless.yml:

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - sqs:
        path: /{version}/event/receiver
        method: post
        queueName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SqsQueue', 'QueueName'] }
        request:
          template:
            application/json: |-
              #set ($body = $util.parseJson($input.body))
              Action=SendMessage##
              &MessageGroupId=$util.urlEncode($body.event_type)##
              &MessageDeduplicationId=$util.urlEncode($body.event_id)##
              &MessageAttribute.1.Name=$util.urlEncode("X-Custom-Signature")##
              &MessageAttribute.1.Value.DataType=String##
              &MessageAttribute.1.Value.StringValue=$util.urlEncode($input.params("X-Custom-Signature"))##
              &MessageBody=$util.urlEncode($input.body)

Note that the ## at the end of each line is an empty comment. In VTL this has the effect of stripping the newline from the end of the line (as it is commented out), which makes API Gateway read all the lines in the template as one line.

Be careful when mixing additional requestParameters into your SQS endpoint as you may overwrite the integration.request.header.Content-Type and stop the request template from being parsed correctly. You may also unintentionally create conflicts between parameters passed using requestParameters and those in your request template. Typically you should only use the request template if you need to manipulate the incoming request body in some way.

Your custom template must also set the Action and MessageBody parameters, as these will not be added for you by the plugin.

When using a custom request body, headers sent by a client will no longer be passed through to the SQS queue (PassthroughBehavior is automatically set to NEVER). You will need to pass through headers sent by the client explicitly in the request body. Also, any custom querystring parameters in the requestParameters array will be ignored. These also need to be added via the custom request body.

SNS

Similar to the Kinesis support, you can customize the default request mapping templates in serverless.yml like so:

# Required for using Fn::Sub
plugins:
  - serverless-cloudformation-sub-variables

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /sns
        method: post
        topicName: { 'Fn::GetAtt': ['SNSTopic', 'TopicName'] }
        request:
          template:
            application/json:
              Fn::Sub:
                - "Action=Publish&Message=$util.urlEncode('This is a fixed message')&TopicArn=$util.urlEncode('#{MyTopicArn}')"
                - MyTopicArn: { Ref: MyTopic }

It is important that the mapping template will return a valid application/x-www-form-urlencoded string

Source: Connect AWS API Gateway directly to SNS using a service integration

Custom response body mapping templates

You can customize the response body by providing mapping templates for success, server errors (5xx) and client errors (4xx).

Templates must be in JSON format. If a template isn't provided, the integration response will be returned as-is to the client.

Kinesis Example

custom:
  apiGatewayServiceProxies:
    - kinesis:
        path: /kinesis
        method: post
        streamName: { Ref: 'MyStream' }
        response:
          template:
            success: |
              {
                "success": true
              }
            serverError: |
              {
                "success": false,
                "errorMessage": "Server Error"
              }
            clientError: |
              {
                "success": false,
                "errorMessage": "Client Error"
              }

Author: Serverless-operations
Source Code: https://github.com/serverless-operations/serverless-apigateway-service-proxy 
License: 

#serverless #api #aws 

Cron Job Scheduling In Laravel

Today I will show you Cron Job Scheduling In Laravel, many time we require to run some piece of code specific interval time period in laravel and we need to run manually every time but command scheduler through we can run and create cron job in laravel.

So, here i will teach you how to create cron job in laravel, and how to create custom command in laravel.

Cron Job Scheduling In Laravel

https://websolutionstuff.com/post/cron-job-scheduling-in-laravel

#cron job scheduling in laravel #laravel #scheduling #scheduler #cron #how to create cron job in laravel

Rufus Scheduler: Job Scheduler for Ruby (at, Cron, in and Every Jobs)

rufus-scheduler

Job scheduler for Ruby (at, cron, in and every jobs).

It uses threads.

Note: maybe are you looking for the README of rufus-scheduler 2.x? (especially if you're using Dashing which is stuck on rufus-scheduler 2.0.24)

Quickstart:

# quickstart.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.in '3s' do
  puts 'Hello... Rufus'
end

scheduler.join
  #
  # let the current thread join the scheduler thread
  #
  # (please note that this join should be removed when scheduling
  # in a web application (Rails and friends) initializer)

(run with ruby quickstart.rb)

Various forms of scheduling are supported:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

# ...

scheduler.in '10d' do
  # do something in 10 days
end

scheduler.at '2030/12/12 23:30:00' do
  # do something at a given point in time
end

scheduler.every '3h' do
  # do something every 3 hours
end
scheduler.every '3h10m' do
  # do something every 3 hours and 10 minutes
end

scheduler.cron '5 0 * * *' do
  # do something every day, five minutes after midnight
  # (see "man 5 crontab" in your terminal)
end

# ...

Rufus-scheduler uses fugit for parsing time strings, et-orbi for pairing time and tzinfo timezones.

non-features

Rufus-scheduler (out of the box) is an in-process, in-memory scheduler. It uses threads.

It does not persist your schedules. When the process is gone and the scheduler instance with it, the schedules are gone.

A rufus-scheduler instance will go on scheduling while it is present among the objects in a Ruby process. To make it stop scheduling you have to call its #shutdown method.

related and similar gems

  • Whenever - let cron call back your Ruby code, trusted and reliable cron drives your schedule
  • ruby-clock - a clock process / job scheduler for Ruby
  • Clockwork - rufus-scheduler inspired gem
  • Crono - an in-Rails cron scheduler
  • PerfectSched - highly available distributed cron built on Sequel and more

(please note: rufus-scheduler is not a cron replacement)

note about the 3.0 line

It's a complete rewrite of rufus-scheduler.

There is no EventMachine-based scheduler anymore.

I don't know what this Ruby thing is, where are my Rails?

I'll drive you right to the tracks.

notable changes:

  • As said, no more EventMachine-based scheduler
  • scheduler.every('100') { will schedule every 100 seconds (previously, it would have been 0.1s). This aligns rufus-scheduler with Ruby's sleep(100)
  • The scheduler isn't catching the whole of Exception anymore, only StandardError
  • The error_handler is #on_error (instead of #on_exception), by default it now prints the details of the error to $stderr (used to be $stdout)
  • Rufus::Scheduler::TimeOutError renamed to Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError
  • Introduction of "interval" jobs. Whereas "every" jobs are like "every 10 minutes, do this", interval jobs are like "do that, then wait for 10 minutes, then do that again, and so on"
  • Introduction of a lockfile: true/filename mechanism to prevent multiple schedulers from executing
  • "discard_past" is on by default. If the scheduler (its host) sleeps for 1 hour and a every '10m' job is on, it will trigger once at wakeup, not 6 times (discard_past was false by default in rufus-scheduler 2.x). No intention to re-introduce discard_past: false in 3.0 for now.
  • Introduction of Scheduler #on_pre_trigger and #on_post_trigger callback points

getting help

So you need help. People can help you, but first help them help you, and don't waste their time. Provide a complete description of the issue. If it works on A but not on B and others have to ask you: "so what is different between A and B" you are wasting everyone's time.

"hello", "please" and "thanks" are not swear words.

Go read how to report bugs effectively, twice.

Update: help_help.md might help help you.

on Gitter

You can find help via chat over at https://gitter.im/floraison/fugit. It's fugit, et-orbi, and rufus-scheduler combined chat room.

Please be courteous.

issues

Yes, issues can be reported in rufus-scheduler issues, I'd actually prefer bugs in there. If there is nothing wrong with rufus-scheduler, a Stack Overflow question is better.

faq

scheduling

Rufus-scheduler supports five kinds of jobs. in, at, every, interval and cron jobs.

Most of the rufus-scheduler examples show block scheduling, but it's also OK to schedule handler instances or handler classes.

in, at, every, interval, cron

In and at jobs trigger once.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.in '10d' do
  puts "10 days reminder for review X!"
end

scheduler.at '2014/12/24 2000' do
  puts "merry xmas!"
end

In jobs are scheduled with a time interval, they trigger after that time elapsed. At jobs are scheduled with a point in time, they trigger when that point in time is reached (better to choose a point in the future).

Every, interval and cron jobs trigger repeatedly.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

scheduler.every '3h' do
  puts "change the oil filter!"
end

scheduler.interval '2h' do
  puts "thinking..."
  puts sleep(rand * 1000)
  puts "thought."
end

scheduler.cron '00 09 * * *' do
  puts "it's 9am! good morning!"
end

Every jobs try hard to trigger following the frequency they were scheduled with.

Interval jobs trigger, execute and then trigger again after the interval elapsed. (every jobs time between trigger times, interval jobs time between trigger termination and the next trigger start).

Cron jobs are based on the venerable cron utility (man 5 crontab). They trigger following a pattern given in (almost) the same language cron uses.

 

#schedule_x vs #x

schedule_in, schedule_at, schedule_cron, etc will return the new Job instance.

in, at, cron will return the new Job instance's id (a String).

job_id =
  scheduler.in '10d' do
    # ...
  end
job = scheduler.job(job_id)

# versus

job =
  scheduler.schedule_in '10d' do
    # ...
  end

# also

job =
  scheduler.in '10d', job: true do
    # ...
  end

#schedule and #repeat

Sometimes it pays to be less verbose.

The #schedule methods schedules an at, in or cron job. It just decides based on its input. It returns the Job instance.

scheduler.schedule '10d' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::InJob

scheduler.schedule '2013/12/12 12:30' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::AtJob

scheduler.schedule '* * * * *' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::CronJob

The #repeat method schedules and returns an EveryJob or a CronJob.

scheduler.repeat '10d' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::EveryJob

scheduler.repeat '* * * * *' do; end.class
  # => Rufus::Scheduler::CronJob

(Yes, no combination here gives back an IntervalJob).

schedule blocks arguments (job, time)

A schedule block may be given 0, 1 or 2 arguments.

The first argument is "job", it's simply the Job instance involved. It might be useful if the job is to be unscheduled for some reason.

scheduler.every '10m' do |job|

  status = determine_pie_status

  if status == 'burnt' || status == 'cooked'
    stop_oven
    takeout_pie
    job.unschedule
  end
end

The second argument is "time", it's the time when the job got cleared for triggering (not Time.now).

Note that time is the time when the job got cleared for triggering. If there are mutexes involved, now = mutex_wait_time + time...

"every" jobs and changing the next_time in-flight

It's OK to change the next_time of an every job in-flight:

scheduler.every '10m' do |job|

  # ...

  status = determine_pie_status

  job.next_time = Time.now + 30 * 60 if status == 'burnt'
    #
    # if burnt, wait 30 minutes for the oven to cool a bit
end

It should work as well with cron jobs, not so with interval jobs whose next_time is computed after their block ends its current run.

scheduling handler instances

It's OK to pass any object, as long as it responds to #call(), when scheduling:

class Handler
  def self.call(job, time)
    p "- Handler called for #{job.id} at #{time}"
  end
end

scheduler.in '10d', Handler

# or

class OtherHandler
  def initialize(name)
    @name = name
  end
  def call(job, time)
    p "* #{time} - Handler #{name.inspect} called for #{job.id}"
  end
end

oh = OtherHandler.new('Doe')

scheduler.every '10m', oh
scheduler.in '3d5m', oh

The call method must accept 2 (job, time), 1 (job) or 0 arguments.

Note that time is the time when the job got cleared for triggering. If there are mutexes involved, now = mutex_wait_time + time...

scheduling handler classes

One can pass a handler class to rufus-scheduler when scheduling. Rufus will instantiate it and that instance will be available via job#handler.

class MyHandler
  attr_reader :count
  def initialize
    @count = 0
  end
  def call(job)
    @count += 1
    puts ". #{self.class} called at #{Time.now} (#{@count})"
  end
end

job = scheduler.schedule_every '35m', MyHandler

job.handler
  # => #<MyHandler:0x000000021034f0>
job.handler.count
  # => 0

If you want to keep that "block feeling":

job_id =
  scheduler.every '10m', Class.new do
    def call(job)
      puts ". hello #{self.inspect} at #{Time.now}"
    end
  end

pause and resume the scheduler

The scheduler can be paused via the #pause and #resume methods. One can determine if the scheduler is currently paused by calling #paused?.

While paused, the scheduler still accepts schedules, but no schedule will get triggered as long as #resume isn't called.

job options

name: string

Sets the name of the job.

scheduler.cron '*/15 8 * * *', name: 'Robert' do |job|
  puts "A, it's #{Time.now} and my name is #{job.name}"
end

job1 =
  scheduler.schedule_cron '*/30 9 * * *', n: 'temporary' do |job|
    puts "B, it's #{Time.now} and my name is #{job.name}"
  end
# ...
job1.name = 'Beowulf'

blocking: true

By default, jobs are triggered in their own, new threads. When blocking: true, the job is triggered in the scheduler thread (a new thread is not created). Yes, while a blocking job is running, the scheduler is not scheduling.

overlap: false

Since, by default, jobs are triggered in their own new threads, job instances might overlap. For example, a job that takes 10 minutes and is scheduled every 7 minutes will have overlaps.

To prevent overlap, one can set overlap: false. Such a job will not trigger if one of its instances is already running.

The :overlap option is considered before the :mutex option when the scheduler is reviewing jobs for triggering.

mutex: mutex_instance / mutex_name / array of mutexes

When a job with a mutex triggers, the job's block is executed with the mutex around it, preventing other jobs with the same mutex from entering (it makes the other jobs wait until it exits the mutex).

This is different from overlap: false, which is, first, limited to instances of the same job, and, second, doesn't make the incoming job instance block/wait but give up.

:mutex accepts a mutex instance or a mutex name (String). It also accept an array of mutex names / mutex instances. It allows for complex relations between jobs.

Array of mutexes: original idea and implementation by Rainux Luo

Note: creating lots of different mutexes is OK. Rufus-scheduler will place them in its Scheduler#mutexes hash... And they won't get garbage collected.

The :overlap option is considered before the :mutex option when the scheduler is reviewing jobs for triggering.

timeout: duration or point in time

It's OK to specify a timeout when scheduling some work. After the time specified, it gets interrupted via a Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError.

scheduler.in '10d', timeout: '1d' do
  begin
    # ... do something
  rescue Rufus::Scheduler::TimeoutError
    # ... that something got interrupted after 1 day
  end
end

The :timeout option accepts either a duration (like "1d" or "2w3d") or a point in time (like "2013/12/12 12:00").

:first_at, :first_in, :first, :first_time

This option is for repeat jobs (cron / every) only.

It's used to specify the first time after which the repeat job should trigger for the first time.

In the case of an "every" job, this will be the first time (modulo the scheduler frequency) the job triggers. For a "cron" job as well, the :first will point to the first time the job has to trigger, the following trigger times are then determined by the cron string.

scheduler.every '2d', first_at: Time.now + 10 * 3600 do
  # ... every two days, but start in 10 hours
end

scheduler.every '2d', first_in: '10h' do
  # ... every two days, but start in 10 hours
end

scheduler.cron '00 14 * * *', first_in: '3d' do
  # ... every day at 14h00, but start after 3 * 24 hours
end

:first, :first_at and :first_in all accept a point in time or a duration (number or time string). Use the symbol you think makes your schedule more readable.

Note: it's OK to change the first_at (a Time instance) directly:

job.first_at = Time.now + 10
job.first_at = Rufus::Scheduler.parse('2029-12-12')

The first argument (in all its flavours) accepts a :now or :immediately value. That schedules the first occurrence for immediate triggering. Consider:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

n = Time.now; p [ :scheduled_at, n, n.to_f ]

s.every '3s', first: :now do
  n = Time.now; p [ :in, n, n.to_f ]
end

s.join

that'll output something like:

[:scheduled_at, 2014-01-22 22:21:21 +0900, 1390396881.344438]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:21 +0900, 1390396881.6453865]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:24 +0900, 1390396884.648807]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:27 +0900, 1390396887.651686]
[:in, 2014-01-22 22:21:30 +0900, 1390396890.6571937]
...

:last_at, :last_in, :last

This option is for repeat jobs (cron / every) only.

It indicates the point in time after which the job should unschedule itself.

scheduler.cron '5 23 * * *', last_in: '10d' do
  # ... do something every evening at 23:05 for 10 days
end

scheduler.every '10m', last_at: Time.now + 10 * 3600 do
  # ... do something every 10 minutes for 10 hours
end

scheduler.every '10m', last_in: 10 * 3600 do
  # ... do something every 10 minutes for 10 hours
end

:last, :last_at and :last_in all accept a point in time or a duration (number or time string). Use the symbol you think makes your schedule more readable.

Note: it's OK to change the last_at (nil or a Time instance) directly:

job.last_at = nil
  # remove the "last" bound

job.last_at = Rufus::Scheduler.parse('2029-12-12')
  # set the last bound

times: nb of times (before auto-unscheduling)

One can tell how many times a repeat job (CronJob or EveryJob) is to execute before unscheduling by itself.

scheduler.every '2d', times: 10 do
  # ... do something every two days, but not more than 10 times
end

scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *', times: 31 do
  # ... do something every day at 23:00 but do it no more than 31 times
end

It's OK to assign nil to :times to make sure the repeat job is not limited. It's useful when the :times is determined at scheduling time.

scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *', times: (nolimit ? nil : 10) do
  # ...
end

The value set by :times is accessible in the job. It can be modified anytime.

job =
  scheduler.cron '0 23 * * *' do
    # ...
  end

# later on...

job.times = 10
  # 10 days and it will be over

Job methods

When calling a schedule method, the id (String) of the job is returned. Longer schedule methods return Job instances directly. Calling the shorter schedule methods with the job: true also returns Job instances instead of Job ids (Strings).

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

  job_id =
    scheduler.in '10d' do
      # ...
    end

  job =
    scheduler.schedule_in '1w' do
      # ...
    end

  job =
    scheduler.in '1w', job: true do
      # ...
    end

Those Job instances have a few interesting methods / properties:

id, job_id

Returns the job id.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do; end
job.id
  # => "in_1374072446.8923042_0.0_0"

scheduler

Returns the scheduler instance itself.

opts

Returns the options passed at the Job creation.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.opts
  # => { :tag => 'hello' }

original

Returns the original schedule.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.original
  # => '10d'

callable, handler

callable() returns the scheduled block (or the call method of the callable object passed in lieu of a block)

handler() returns nil if a block was scheduled and the instance scheduled otherwise.

# when passing a block

job =
  scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do
    # ...
  end

job.handler
  # => nil
job.callable
  # => #<Proc:0x00000001dc6f58@/home/jmettraux/whatever.rb:115>

and

# when passing something else than a block

class MyHandler
  attr_reader :counter
  def initialize
    @counter = 0
  end
  def call(job, time)
    @counter = @counter + 1
  end
end

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', MyHandler.new)

job.handler
  # => #<Method: MyHandler#call>
job.callable
  # => #<MyHandler:0x0000000163ae88 @counter=0>

source_location

Added to rufus-scheduler 3.8.0.

Returns the array [ 'path/to/file.rb', 123 ] like Proc#source_location does.

require 'rufus-scheduler'

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

job = scheduler.schedule_every('2h') { p Time.now }

p job.source_location
  # ==> [ '/home/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/test.rb', 6 ]

scheduled_at

Returns the Time instance when the job got created.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900

last_time

Returns the last time the job triggered (is usually nil for AtJob and InJob).

job = scheduler.schedule_every('10s') do; end

job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900
job.last_time
  # => nil (since we've just scheduled it)

# after 10 seconds

job.scheduled_at
  # => 2013-07-17 23:48:54 +0900 (same as above)
job.last_time
  # => 2013-07-17 23:49:04 +0900

previous_time

Returns the previous #next_time

scheduler.every('10s') do |job|
  puts "job scheduled for #{job.previous_time} triggered at #{Time.now}"
  puts "next time will be around #{job.next_time}"
  puts "."
end

last_work_time, mean_work_time

The job keeps track of how long its work was in the last_work_time attribute. For a one time job (in, at) it's probably not very useful.

The attribute mean_work_time contains a computed mean work time. It's recomputed after every run (if it's a repeat job).

next_times(n)

Returns an array of EtOrbi::EoTime instances (Time instances with a designated time zone), listing the n next occurrences for this job.

Please note that for "interval" jobs, a mean work time is computed each time and it's used by this #next_times(n) method to approximate the next times beyond the immediate next time.

unschedule

Unschedule the job, preventing it from firing again and removing it from the schedule. This doesn't prevent a running thread for this job to run until its end.

threads

Returns the list of threads currently "hosting" runs of this Job instance.

kill

Interrupts all the work threads currently running for this job instance. They discard their work and are free for their next run (of whatever job).

Note: this doesn't unschedule the Job instance.

Note: if the job is pooled for another run, a free work thread will probably pick up that next run and the job will appear as running again. You'd have to unschedule and kill to make sure the job doesn't run again.

running?

Returns true if there is at least one running Thread hosting a run of this Job instance.

scheduled?

Returns true if the job is scheduled (is due to trigger). For repeat jobs it should return true until the job gets unscheduled. "at" and "in" jobs will respond with false as soon as they start running (execution triggered).

pause, resume, paused?, paused_at

These four methods are only available to CronJob, EveryJob and IntervalJob instances. One can pause or resume such jobs thanks to these methods.

job =
  scheduler.schedule_every('10s') do
    # ...
  end

job.pause
  # => 2013-07-20 01:22:22 +0900
job.paused?
  # => true
job.paused_at
  # => 2013-07-20 01:22:22 +0900

job.resume
  # => nil

tags

Returns the list of tags attached to this Job instance.

By default, returns an empty array.

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d') do; end
job.tags
  # => []

job = scheduler.schedule_in('10d', tag: 'hello') do; end
job.tags
  # => [ 'hello' ]

[]=, [], key?, has_key?, keys, values, and entries

Threads have thread-local variables, similarly Rufus-scheduler jobs have job-local variables. Those are more like a dict with thread-safe access.

job =
  @scheduler.schedule_every '1s' do |job|
    job[:timestamp] = Time.now.to_f
    job[:counter] ||= 0
    job[:counter] += 1
  end

sleep 3.6

job[:counter]
  # => 3

job.key?(:timestamp) # => true
job.has_key?(:timestamp) # => true
job.keys # => [ :timestamp, :counter ]

Locals can be set at schedule time:

job0 =
  @scheduler.schedule_cron '*/15 12 * * *', locals: { a: 0 } do
    # ...
  end
job1 =
  @scheduler.schedule_cron '*/15 13 * * *', l: { a: 1 } do
    # ...
  end

One can fetch the Hash directly with Job#locals. Of course, direct manipulation is not thread-safe.

job.locals.entries do |k, v|
  p "#{k}: #{v}"
end

call

Job instances have a #call method. It simply calls the scheduled block or callable immediately.

job =
  @scheduler.schedule_every '10m' do |job|
    # ...
  end

job.call

Warning: the Scheduler#on_error handler is not involved. Error handling is the responsibility of the caller.

If the call has to be rescued by the error handler of the scheduler, call(true) might help:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

def s.on_error(job, err)
  if job
    p [ 'error in scheduled job', job.class, job.original, err.message ]
  else
    p [ 'error while scheduling', err.message ]
  end
rescue
  p $!
end

job =
  s.schedule_in('1d') do
    fail 'again'
  end

job.call(true)
  #
  # true lets the error_handler deal with error in the job call

AtJob and InJob methods

time

Returns when the job will trigger (hopefully).

next_time

An alias for time.

EveryJob, IntervalJob and CronJob methods

next_time

Returns the next time the job will trigger (hopefully).

count

Returns how many times the job fired.

EveryJob methods

frequency

It returns the scheduling frequency. For a job scheduled "every 20s", it's 20.

It's used to determine if the job frequency is higher than the scheduler frequency (it raises an ArgumentError if that is the case).

IntervalJob methods

interval

Returns the interval scheduled between each execution of the job.

Every jobs use a time duration between each start of their execution, while interval jobs use a time duration between the end of an execution and the start of the next.

CronJob methods

brute_frequency

An expensive method to run, it's brute. It caches its results. By default it runs for 2017 (a non leap-year).

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * *').brute_frequency
    #
    # => #<Fugit::Cron::Frequency:0x00007fdf4520c5e8
    #      @span=31536000.0, @delta_min=60, @delta_max=60,
    #      @occurrences=525600, @span_years=1.0, @yearly_occurrences=525600.0>
      #
      # Occurs 525600 times in a span of 1 year (2017) and 1 day.
      # There are least 60 seconds between "triggers" and at most 60 seconds.

  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('0 12 * * *').brute_frequency
    # => #<Fugit::Cron::Frequency:0x00007fdf451ec6d0
    #      @span=31536000.0, @delta_min=86400, @delta_max=86400,
    #      @occurrences=365, @span_years=1.0, @yearly_occurrences=365.0>
  Rufus::Scheduler.parse('0 12 * * *').brute_frequency.to_debug_s
    # => "dmin: 1D, dmax: 1D, ocs: 365, spn: 52W1D, spnys: 1, yocs: 365"
      #
      # 365 occurrences, at most 1 day between each, at least 1 day.

The CronJob#frequency method found in rufus-scheduler < 3.5 has been retired.

looking up jobs

Scheduler#job(job_id)

The scheduler #job(job_id) method can be used to look up Job instances.

  require 'rufus-scheduler'

  scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new

  job_id =
    scheduler.in '10d' do
      # ...
    end

  # later on...

  job = scheduler.job(job_id)

Scheduler #jobs #at_jobs #in_jobs #every_jobs #interval_jobs and #cron_jobs

Are methods for looking up lists of scheduled Job instances.

Here is an example:

  #
  # let's unschedule all the at jobs

  scheduler.at_jobs.each(&:unschedule)

Scheduler#jobs(tag: / tags: x)

When scheduling a job, one can specify one or more tags attached to the job. These can be used to look up the job later on.

  scheduler.in '10d', tag: 'main_process' do
    # ...
  end
  scheduler.in '10d', tags: [ 'main_process', 'side_dish' ] do
    # ...
  end

  # ...

  jobs = scheduler.jobs(tag: 'main_process')
    # find all the jobs with the 'main_process' tag

  jobs = scheduler.jobs(tags: [ 'main_process', 'side_dish' ]
    # find all the jobs with the 'main_process' AND 'side_dish' tags

Scheduler#running_jobs

Returns the list of Job instance that have currently running instances.

Whereas other "_jobs" method scan the scheduled job list, this method scans the thread list to find the job. It thus comprises jobs that are running but are not scheduled anymore (that happens for at and in jobs).

misc Scheduler methods

Scheduler#unschedule(job_or_job_id)

Unschedule a job given directly or by its id.

Scheduler#shutdown

Shuts down the scheduler, ceases any scheduler/triggering activity.

Scheduler#shutdown(:wait)

Shuts down the scheduler, waits (blocks) until all the jobs cease running.

Scheduler#shutdown(wait: n)

Shuts down the scheduler, waits (blocks) at most n seconds until all the jobs cease running. (Jobs are killed after n seconds have elapsed).

Scheduler#shutdown(:kill)

Kills all the job (threads) and then shuts the scheduler down. Radical.

Scheduler#down?

Returns true if the scheduler has been shut down.

Scheduler#started_at

Returns the Time instance at which the scheduler got started.

Scheduler #uptime / #uptime_s

Returns since the count of seconds for which the scheduler has been running.

#uptime_s returns this count in a String easier to grasp for humans, like "3d12m45s123".

Scheduler#join

Lets the current thread join the scheduling thread in rufus-scheduler. The thread comes back when the scheduler gets shut down.

#join is mostly used in standalone scheduling script (or tiny one file examples). Calling #join from a web application initializer will probably hijack the main thread and prevent the web application from being served. Do not put a #join in such a web application initializer file.

Scheduler#threads

Returns all the threads associated with the scheduler, including the scheduler thread itself.

Scheduler#work_threads(query=:all/:active/:vacant)

Lists the work threads associated with the scheduler. The query option defaults to :all.

  • :all : all the work threads
  • :active : all the work threads currently running a Job
  • :vacant : all the work threads currently not running a Job

Note that the main schedule thread will be returned if it is currently running a Job (ie one of those blocking: true jobs).

Scheduler#scheduled?(job_or_job_id)

Returns true if the arg is a currently scheduled job (see Job#scheduled?).

Scheduler#occurrences(time0, time1)

Returns a hash { job => [ t0, t1, ... ] } mapping jobs to their potential trigger time within the [ time0, time1 ] span.

Please note that, for interval jobs, the #mean_work_time is used, so the result is only a prediction.

Scheduler#timeline(time0, time1)

Like #occurrences but returns a list [ [ t0, job0 ], [ t1, job1 ], ... ] of time + job pairs.

dealing with job errors

The easy, job-granular way of dealing with errors is to rescue and deal with them immediately. The two next sections show examples. Skip them for explanations on how to deal with errors at the scheduler level.

block jobs

As said, jobs could take care of their errors themselves.

scheduler.every '10m' do
  begin
    # do something that might fail...
  rescue => e
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
    $stderr.puts e.message
    $stderr.puts e.stacktrace
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
  end
end

callable jobs

Jobs are not only shrunk to blocks, here is how the above would look like with a dedicated class.

scheduler.every '10m', Class.new do
  def call(job)
    # do something that might fail...
  rescue => e
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
    $stderr.puts e.message
    $stderr.puts e.stacktrace
    $stderr.puts '-' * 80
  end
end

TODO: talk about callable#on_error (if implemented)

(see scheduling handler instances and scheduling handler classes for more about those "callable jobs")

Rufus::Scheduler#stderr=

By default, rufus-scheduler intercepts all errors (that inherit from StandardError) and dumps abundant details to $stderr.

If, for example, you'd like to divert that flow to another file (descriptor), you can reassign $stderr for the current Ruby process

$stderr = File.open('/var/log/myapplication.log', 'ab')

or, you can limit that reassignement to the scheduler itself

scheduler.stderr = File.open('/var/log/myapplication.log', 'ab')

Rufus::Scheduler#on_error(job, error)

We've just seen that, by default, rufus-scheduler dumps error information to $stderr. If one needs to completely change what happens in case of error, it's OK to overwrite #on_error

def scheduler.on_error(job, error)

  Logger.warn("intercepted error in #{job.id}: #{error.message}")
end

On Rails, the on_error method redefinition might look like:

def scheduler.on_error(job, error)

  Rails.logger.error(
    "err#{error.object_id} rufus-scheduler intercepted #{error.inspect}" +
    " in job #{job.inspect}")
  error.backtrace.each_with_index do |line, i|
    Rails.logger.error(
      "err#{error.object_id} #{i}: #{line}")
  end
end

Callbacks

Rufus::Scheduler #on_pre_trigger and #on_post_trigger callbacks

One can bind callbacks before and after jobs trigger:

s = Rufus::Scheduler.new

def s.on_pre_trigger(job, trigger_time)
  puts "triggering job #{job.id}..."
end

def s.on_post_trigger(job, trigger_time)
  puts "triggered job #{job.id}."
end

s.every '1s' do
  # ...
end

The trigger_time is the time at which the job triggers. It might be a bit before Time.now.

Warning: these two callbacks are executed in the scheduler thread, not in the work threads (the threads where the job execution really happens).

Rufus::Scheduler#around_trigger

One can create an around callback which will wrap a job:

def s.around_trigger(job)
  t = Time.now
  puts "Starting job #{job.id}..."
  yield
  puts "job #{job.id} finished in #{Time.now-t} seconds."
end

The around callback is executed in the thread.

Rufus::Scheduler#on_pre_trigger as a guard

Returning false in on_pre_trigger will prevent the job from triggering. Returning anything else (nil, -1, true, ...) will let the job trigger.

Note: your business logic should go in the scheduled block itself (or the scheduled instance). Don't put business logic in on_pre_trigger. Return false for admin reasons (backend down, etc), not for business reasons that are tied to the job itself.

def s.on_pre_trigger(job, trigger_time)

  return false if Backend.down?

  puts "triggering job #{job.id}..."
end

Rufus::Scheduler.new options

:frequency

By default, rufus-scheduler sleeps 0.300 second between every step. At each step it checks for jobs to trigger and so on.

The :frequency option lets you change that 0.300 second to something else.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(frequency: 5)

It's OK to use a time string to specify the frequency.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(frequency: '2h10m')
  # this scheduler will sleep 2 hours and 10 minutes between every "step"

Use with care.

lockfile: "mylockfile.txt"

This feature only works on OSes that support the flock (man 2 flock) call.

Starting the scheduler with lockfile: '.rufus-scheduler.lock' will make the scheduler attempt to create and lock the file .rufus-scheduler.lock in the current working directory. If that fails, the scheduler will not start.

The idea is to guarantee only one scheduler (in a group of schedulers sharing the same lockfile) is running.

This is useful in environments where the Ruby process holding the scheduler gets started multiple times.

If the lockfile mechanism here is not sufficient, you can plug your custom mechanism. It's explained in advanced lock schemes below.

:scheduler_lock

(since rufus-scheduler 3.0.9)

The scheduler lock is an object that responds to #lock and #unlock. The scheduler calls #lock when starting up. If the answer is false, the scheduler stops its initialization work and won't schedule anything.

Here is a sample of a scheduler lock that only lets the scheduler on host "coffee.example.com" start:

class HostLock
  def initialize(lock_name)
    @lock_name = lock_name
  end
  def lock
    @lock_name == `hostname -f`.strip
  end
  def unlock
    true
  end
end

scheduler =
  Rufus::Scheduler.new(scheduler_lock: HostLock.new('coffee.example.com'))

By default, the scheduler_lock is an instance of Rufus::Scheduler::NullLock, with a #lock that returns true.

:trigger_lock

(since rufus-scheduler 3.0.9)

The trigger lock in an object that responds to #lock. The scheduler calls that method on the job lock right before triggering any job. If the answer is false, the trigger doesn't happen, the job is not done (at least not in this scheduler).

Here is a (stupid) PingLock example, it'll only trigger if an "other host" is not responding to ping. Do not use that in production, you don't want to fork a ping process for each trigger attempt...

class PingLock
  def initialize(other_host)
    @other_host = other_host
  end
  def lock
    ! system("ping -c 1 #{@other_host}")
  end
end

scheduler =
  Rufus::Scheduler.new(trigger_lock: PingLock.new('main.example.com'))

By default, the trigger_lock is an instance of Rufus::Scheduler::NullLock, with a #lock that always returns true.

As explained in advanced lock schemes, another way to tune that behaviour is by overriding the scheduler's #confirm_lock method. (You could also do that with an #on_pre_trigger callback).

:max_work_threads

In rufus-scheduler 2.x, by default, each job triggering received its own, brand new, thread of execution. In rufus-scheduler 3.x, execution happens in a pooled work thread. The max work thread count (the pool size) defaults to 28.

One can set this maximum value when starting the scheduler.

scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new(max_work_threads: 77)

It's OK to increase the :max_work_threads of a running scheduler.

scheduler.max_work_threads += 10

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton

Do not want to store a reference to your rufus-scheduler instance? Then Rufus::Scheduler.singleton can help, it returns a singleton instance of the scheduler, initialized the first time this class method is called.

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.every '10s' { puts "hello, world!" }

It's OK to pass initialization arguments (like :frequency or :max_work_threads) but they will only be taken into account the first time .singleton is called.

Rufus::Scheduler.singleton(max_work_threads: 77)
Rufus::Scheduler.singleton(max_work_threads: 277) # no effect

The .s is a shortcut for .singleton.

Rufus::Scheduler.s.every '10s' { puts "hello, world!" }

advanced lock schemes

As seen above, rufus-scheduler proposes the :lockfile system out of the box. If in a group of schedulers only one is supposed to run, the lockfile mechanism prevents schedulers that have not set/created the lockfile from running.

There are situations where this is not sufficient.

By overriding #lock and #unlock, one can customize how schedulers lock.

This example was provided by Eric Lindvall:

class ZookeptScheduler < Rufus::Scheduler

  def initialize(zookeeper, opts={})
    @zk = zookeeper
    super(opts)
  end

  def lock
    @zk_locker = @zk.exclusive_locker('scheduler')
    @zk_locker.lock # returns true if the lock was acquired, false else
  end

  def unlock
    @zk_locker.unlock
  end

  def confirm_lock
    return false if down?
    @zk_locker.assert!
  rescue ZK::Exceptions::LockAssertionFailedError => e
    # we've lost the lock, shutdown (and return false to at least prevent
    # this job from triggering
    shutdown
    false
  end
end

This uses a zookeeper to make sure only one scheduler in a group of distributed schedulers runs.

The methods #lock and #unlock are overridden and #confirm_lock is provided, to make sure that the lock is still valid.

The #confirm_lock method is called right before a job triggers (if it is provided). The more generic callback #on_pre_trigger is called right after #confirm_lock.

:scheduler_lock and :trigger_lock

(introduced in rufus-scheduler 3.0.9).

Another way of prodiving #lock, #unlock and #confirm_lock to a rufus-scheduler is by using the :scheduler_lock and :trigger_lock options.

See :trigger_lock and :scheduler_lock.

The scheduler lock may be used to prevent a scheduler from starting, while a trigger lock prevents individual jobs from triggering (the scheduler goes on scheduling).

One has to be careful with what goes in #confirm_lock or in a trigger lock, as it gets called before each trigger.

Warning: you may think you're heading towards "high availability" by using a trigger lock and having lots of schedulers at hand. It may be so if you limit yourself to scheduling the same set of jobs at scheduler startup. But if you add schedules at runtime, they stay local to their scheduler. There is no magic that propagates the jobs to all the schedulers in your pack.

parsing cronlines and time strings

(Please note that fugit does the heavy-lifting parsing work for rufus-scheduler).

Rufus::Scheduler provides a class method .parse to parse time durations and cron strings. It's what it's using when receiving schedules. One can use it directly (no need to instantiate a Scheduler).

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('1w2d')
  # => 777600.0
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('1.0w1.0d')
  # => 777600.0

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012').strftime('%c')
  # => 'Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('Sun Nov 18 16:01:00 2012 Europe/Berlin').strftime('%c %z')
  # => 'Sun Nov 18 15:01:00 2012 +0000'

Rufus::Scheduler.parse(0.1)
  # => 0.1

Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * *')
  # => #<Fugit::Cron:0x00007fb7a3045508
  #      @original="* * * * *", @cron_s=nil,
  #      @seconds=[0], @minutes=nil, @hours=nil, @monthdays=nil, @months=nil,
  #      @weekdays=nil, @zone=nil, @timezone=nil>

It returns a number when the input is a duration and a Fugit::Cron instance when the input is a cron string.

It will raise an ArgumentError if it can't parse the input.

Beyond .parse, there are also .parse_cron and .parse_duration, for finer granularity.

There is an interesting helper method named .to_duration_hash:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(60)
  # => { :m => 1 }
Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(62.127)
  # => { :m => 1, :s => 2, :ms => 127 }

Rufus::Scheduler.to_duration_hash(62.127, drop_seconds: true)
  # => { :m => 1 }

cronline notations specific to rufus-scheduler

first Monday, last Sunday et al

To schedule something at noon every first Monday of the month:

scheduler.cron('00 12 * * mon#1') do
  # ...
end

To schedule something at noon the last Sunday of every month:

scheduler.cron('00 12 * * sun#-1') do
  # ...
end
#
# OR
#
scheduler.cron('00 12 * * sun#L') do
  # ...
end

Such cronlines can be tested with scripts like:

require 'rufus-scheduler'

Time.now
  # => 2013-10-26 07:07:08 +0900
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('* * * * mon#1').next_time.to_s
  # => 2013-11-04 00:00:00 +0900

L (last day of month)

L can be used in the "day" slot:

In this example, the cronline is supposed to trigger every last day of the month at noon:

require 'rufus-scheduler'
Time.now
  # => 2013-10-26 07:22:09 +0900
Rufus::Scheduler.parse('00 12 L * *').next_time.to_s
  # => 2013-10-31 12:00:00 +0900

negative day (x days before the end of the month)

It's OK to pass negative values in the "day" slot:

scheduler.cron '0 0 -5 * *' do
  # do it at 00h00 5 days before the end of the month...
end

Negative ranges (-10--5-: 10 days before the end of the month to 5 days before the end of the month) are OK, but mixed positive / negative ranges will raise an ArgumentError.

Negative ranges with increments (-10---2/2) are accepted as well.

Descending day ranges are not accepted (10-8 or -8--10 for example).

a note about timezones

Cron schedules and at schedules support the specification of a timezone.

scheduler.cron '0 22 * * 1-5 America/Chicago' do
  # the job...
end

scheduler.at '2013-12-12 14:00 Pacific/Samoa' do
  puts "it's tea time!"
end

# or even

Rufus::Scheduler.parse("2013-12-12 14:00 Pacific/Saipan")
  # => #<Rufus::Scheduler::ZoTime:0x007fb424abf4e8 @seconds=1386820800.0, @zone=#<TZInfo::DataTimezone: Pacific/Saipan>, @time=nil>

I get "zotime.rb:41:in `initialize': cannot determine timezone from nil"

For when you see an error like:

rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:41:
  in `initialize':
    cannot determine timezone from nil (etz:nil,tnz:"中国标准时间",tzid:nil)
      (ArgumentError)
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:198:in `new'
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler/zotime.rb:198:in `now'
    from rufus-scheduler/lib/rufus/scheduler.rb:561:in `start'
    ...

It may happen on Windows or on systems that poorly hint to Ruby which timezone to use. It should be solved by setting explicitly the ENV['TZ'] before the scheduler instantiation:

ENV['TZ'] = 'Asia/Shanghai'
scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new
scheduler.every '2s' do
  puts "#{Time.now} Hello #{ENV['TZ']}!"
end

On Rails you might want to try with:

ENV['TZ'] = Time.zone.name # Rails only
scheduler = Rufus::Scheduler.new
scheduler.every '2s' do
  puts "#{Time.now} Hello #{ENV['TZ']}!"
end

(Hat tip to Alexander in gh-230)

Rails sets its timezone under config/application.rb.

Rufus-Scheduler 3.3.3 detects the presence of Rails and uses its timezone setting (tested with Rails 4), so setting ENV['TZ'] should not be necessary.

The value can be determined thanks to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tz_database_time_zones.

Use a "continent/city" identifier (for example "Asia/Shanghai"). Do not use an abbreviation (not "CST") and do not use a local time zone name (not "中国标准时间" nor "Eastern Standard Time" which, for instance, points to a time zone in America and to another one in Australia...).

If the error persists (and especially on Windows), try to add the tzinfo-data to your Gemfile, as in:

gem 'tzinfo-data'

or by manually requiring it before requiring rufus-scheduler (if you don't use Bundler):

require 'tzinfo/data'
require 'rufus-scheduler'

so Rails?

Yes, I know, all of the above is boring and you're only looking for a snippet to paste in your Ruby-on-Rails application to schedule...

Here is an example initializer:

#
# config/initializers/scheduler.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

# Let's use the rufus-scheduler singleton
#
s = Rufus::Scheduler.singleton


# Stupid recurrent task...
#
s.every '1m' do

  Rails.logger.info "hello, it's #{Time.now}"
  Rails.logger.flush
end

And now you tell me that this is good, but you want to schedule stuff from your controller.

Maybe:

class ScheController < ApplicationController

  # GET /sche/
  #
  def index

    job_id =
      Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.in '5s' do
        Rails.logger.info "time flies, it's now #{Time.now}"
      end

    render text: "scheduled job #{job_id}"
  end
end

The rufus-scheduler singleton is instantiated in the config/initializers/scheduler.rb file, it's then available throughout the webapp via Rufus::Scheduler.singleton.

Warning: this works well with single-process Ruby servers like Webrick and Thin. Using rufus-scheduler with Passenger or Unicorn requires a bit more knowledge and tuning, gently provided by a bit of googling and reading, see Faq above.

avoid scheduling when running the Ruby on Rails console

(Written in reply to gh-186)

If you don't want rufus-scheduler to trigger anything while running the Ruby on Rails console, running for tests/specs, or running from a Rake task, you can insert a conditional return statement before jobs are added to the scheduler instance:

#
# config/initializers/scheduler.rb

require 'rufus-scheduler'

return if defined?(Rails::Console) || Rails.env.test? || File.split($PROGRAM_NAME).last == 'rake'
  #
  # do not schedule when Rails is run from its console, for a test/spec, or
  # from a Rake task

# return if $PROGRAM_NAME.include?('spring')
  #
  # see https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/issues/186

s = Rufus::Scheduler.singleton

s.every '1m' do
  Rails.logger.info "hello, it's #{Time.now}"
  Rails.logger.flush
end

(Beware later version of Rails where Spring takes care pre-running the initializers. Running spring stop or disabling Spring might be necessary in some cases to see changes to initializers being taken into account.)

rails server -d

(Written in reply to https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler/issues/165 )

There is the handy rails server -d that starts a development Rails as a daemon. The annoying thing is that the scheduler as seen above is started in the main process that then gets forked and daemonized. The rufus-scheduler thread (and any other thread) gets lost, no scheduling happens.

I avoid running -d in development mode and bother about daemonizing only for production deployment.

These are two well crafted articles on process daemonization, please read them:

If, anyway, you need something like rails server -d, why not try bundle exec unicorn -D instead? In my (limited) experience, it worked out of the box (well, had to add gem 'unicorn' to Gemfile first).

executor / reloader

You might benefit from wraping your scheduled code in the executor or reloader. Read more here: https://guides.rubyonrails.org/threading_and_code_execution.html

support

see getting help above.


Author: jmettraux
Source code: https://github.com/jmettraux/rufus-scheduler
License: MIT license

#ruby 

Dylan  Iqbal

Dylan Iqbal

1561523460

Matplotlib Cheat Sheet: Plotting in Python

This Matplotlib cheat sheet introduces you to the basics that you need to plot your data with Python and includes code samples.

Data visualization and storytelling with your data are essential skills that every data scientist needs to communicate insights gained from analyses effectively to any audience out there. 

For most beginners, the first package that they use to get in touch with data visualization and storytelling is, naturally, Matplotlib: it is a Python 2D plotting library that enables users to make publication-quality figures. But, what might be even more convincing is the fact that other packages, such as Pandas, intend to build more plotting integration with Matplotlib as time goes on.

However, what might slow down beginners is the fact that this package is pretty extensive. There is so much that you can do with it and it might be hard to still keep a structure when you're learning how to work with Matplotlib.   

DataCamp has created a Matplotlib cheat sheet for those who might already know how to use the package to their advantage to make beautiful plots in Python, but that still want to keep a one-page reference handy. Of course, for those who don't know how to work with Matplotlib, this might be the extra push be convinced and to finally get started with data visualization in Python. 

You'll see that this cheat sheet presents you with the six basic steps that you can go through to make beautiful plots. 

Check out the infographic by clicking on the button below:

Python Matplotlib cheat sheet

With this handy reference, you'll familiarize yourself in no time with the basics of Matplotlib: you'll learn how you can prepare your data, create a new plot, use some basic plotting routines to your advantage, add customizations to your plots, and save, show and close the plots that you make.

What might have looked difficult before will definitely be more clear once you start using this cheat sheet! Use it in combination with the Matplotlib Gallery, the documentation.

Matplotlib 

Matplotlib is a Python 2D plotting library which produces publication-quality figures in a variety of hardcopy formats and interactive environments across platforms.

Prepare the Data 

1D Data 

>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.linspace(0, 10, 100)
>>> y = np.cos(x)
>>> z = np.sin(x)

2D Data or Images 

>>> data = 2 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> data2 = 3 * np.random.random((10, 10))
>>> Y, X = np.mgrid[-3:3:100j, -3:3:100j]
>>> U = 1 X** 2 + Y
>>> V = 1 + X Y**2
>>> from matplotlib.cbook import get_sample_data
>>> img = np.load(get_sample_data('axes_grid/bivariate_normal.npy'))

Create Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

Figure 

>>> fig = plt.figure()
>>> fig2 = plt.figure(figsize=plt.figaspect(2.0))

Axes 

>>> fig.add_axes()
>>> ax1 = fig.add_subplot(221) #row-col-num
>>> ax3 = fig.add_subplot(212)
>>> fig3, axes = plt.subplots(nrows=2,ncols=2)
>>> fig4, axes2 = plt.subplots(ncols=3)

Save Plot 

>>> plt.savefig('foo.png') #Save figures
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png',  transparent=True) #Save transparent figures

Show Plot

>>> plt.show()

Plotting Routines 

1D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> lines = ax.plot(x,y) #Draw points with lines or markers connecting them
>>> ax.scatter(x,y) #Draw unconnected points, scaled or colored
>>> axes[0,0].bar([1,2,3],[3,4,5]) #Plot vertical rectangles (constant width)
>>> axes[1,0].barh([0.5,1,2.5],[0,1,2]) #Plot horiontal rectangles (constant height)
>>> axes[1,1].axhline(0.45) #Draw a horizontal line across axes
>>> axes[0,1].axvline(0.65) #Draw a vertical line across axes
>>> ax.fill(x,y,color='blue') #Draw filled polygons
>>> ax.fill_between(x,y,color='yellow') #Fill between y values and 0

2D Data 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> im = ax.imshow(img, #Colormapped or RGB arrays
      cmap= 'gist_earth', 
      interpolation= 'nearest',
      vmin=-2,
      vmax=2)
>>> axes2[0].pcolor(data2) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> axes2[0].pcolormesh(data) #Pseudocolor plot of 2D array
>>> CS = plt.contour(Y,X,U) #Plot contours
>>> axes2[2].contourf(data1) #Plot filled contours
>>> axes2[2]= ax.clabel(CS) #Label a contour plot

Vector Fields 

>>> axes[0,1].arrow(0,0,0.5,0.5) #Add an arrow to the axes
>>> axes[1,1].quiver(y,z) #Plot a 2D field of arrows
>>> axes[0,1].streamplot(X,Y,U,V) #Plot a 2D field of arrows

Data Distributions 

>>> ax1.hist(y) #Plot a histogram
>>> ax3.boxplot(y) #Make a box and whisker plot
>>> ax3.violinplot(z)  #Make a violin plot

Plot Anatomy & Workflow 

Plot Anatomy 

 y-axis      

                           x-axis 

Workflow 

The basic steps to creating plots with matplotlib are:

1 Prepare Data
2 Create Plot
3 Plot
4 Customized Plot
5 Save Plot
6 Show Plot

>>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
>>> x = [1,2,3,4]  #Step 1
>>> y = [10,20,25,30] 
>>> fig = plt.figure() #Step 2
>>> ax = fig.add_subplot(111) #Step 3
>>> ax.plot(x, y, color= 'lightblue', linewidth=3)  #Step 3, 4
>>> ax.scatter([2,4,6],
          [5,15,25],
          color= 'darkgreen',
          marker= '^' )
>>> ax.set_xlim(1, 6.5)
>>> plt.savefig('foo.png' ) #Step 5
>>> plt.show() #Step 6

Close and Clear 

>>> plt.cla()  #Clear an axis
>>> plt.clf(). #Clear the entire figure
>>> plt.close(). #Close a window

Plotting Customize Plot 

Colors, Color Bars & Color Maps 

>>> plt.plot(x, x, x, x**2, x, x** 3)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, alpha = 0.4)
>>> ax.plot(x, y, c= 'k')
>>> fig.colorbar(im, orientation= 'horizontal')
>>> im = ax.imshow(img,
            cmap= 'seismic' )

Markers 

>>> fig, ax = plt.subplots()
>>> ax.scatter(x,y,marker= ".")
>>> ax.plot(x,y,marker= "o")

Linestyles 

>>> plt.plot(x,y,linewidth=4.0)
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= 'solid') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,ls= '--') 
>>> plt.plot(x,y,'--' ,x**2,y**2,'-.' ) 
>>> plt.setp(lines,color= 'r',linewidth=4.0)

Text & Annotations 

>>> ax.text(1,
           -2.1, 
           'Example Graph', 
            style= 'italic' )
>>> ax.annotate("Sine", 
xy=(8, 0),
xycoords= 'data', 
xytext=(10.5, 0),
textcoords= 'data', 
arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle= "->", 
connectionstyle="arc3"),)

Mathtext 

>>> plt.title(r '$sigma_i=15$', fontsize=20)

Limits, Legends and Layouts 

Limits & Autoscaling 

>>> ax.margins(x=0.0,y=0.1) #Add padding to a plot
>>> ax.axis('equal')  #Set the aspect ratio of the plot to 1
>>> ax.set(xlim=[0,10.5],ylim=[-1.5,1.5])  #Set limits for x-and y-axis
>>> ax.set_xlim(0,10.5) #Set limits for x-axis

Legends 

>>> ax.set(title= 'An Example Axes',  #Set a title and x-and y-axis labels
            ylabel= 'Y-Axis', 
            xlabel= 'X-Axis')
>>> ax.legend(loc= 'best')  #No overlapping plot elements

Ticks 

>>> ax.xaxis.set(ticks=range(1,5),  #Manually set x-ticks
             ticklabels=[3,100, 12,"foo" ])
>>> ax.tick_params(axis= 'y', #Make y-ticks longer and go in and out
             direction= 'inout', 
              length=10)

Subplot Spacing 

>>> fig3.subplots_adjust(wspace=0.5,   #Adjust the spacing between subplots
             hspace=0.3,
             left=0.125,
             right=0.9,
             top=0.9,
             bottom=0.1)
>>> fig.tight_layout() #Fit subplot(s) in to the figure area

Axis Spines 

>>> ax1.spines[ 'top'].set_visible(False) #Make the top axis line for a plot invisible
>>> ax1.spines['bottom' ].set_position(( 'outward',10))  #Move the bottom axis line outward

Have this Cheat Sheet at your fingertips

Original article source at https://www.datacamp.com

#matplotlib #cheatsheet #python