Writing the Perfect ReadeMe for Your Node Library

Writing the Perfect ReadeMe for Your Node Library

The Readme file is normally the first thing anybody sees in regards to documentation because people would find our modules through NPM’s. What’s the name of your library? Writing the Perfect Readme for Your Node Library. The structure of writing a good ReadMe file. Add a little of Markdown, sprinkle a little of MDX and you have the perfect recipe.

Add a little of Markdown, sprinkle a little of MDX and you have the perfect recipe.

There is no substitute for good documentation. The more you document the happier your users will be. There is a point, however, where you start getting diminishing returns. In other words, once you pass a threshold the more you keep documenting the less happy your users will be.

What?

Yeah, you have to find a sweet spot, just enough to explain your project but not too much to overwhelm your user. And when it comes to documenting Node.js modules, then the easiest way to do it is to create a comprehensible Readme file.

The structure of a good ReadMe file

The Readme file is normally the first thing anybody sees in regards to documentation because people would find our modules through  NPM’s page,  Yarn’s or even looking at our components on  Bit’s component marketplace.

With that in mind, there are certain things you need to take into consideration to optimize the reading experience of your potential users (i.e other developers).

What’s the name of your library?

That’s the first thing you need to show. The title of your Readme file has to be the name of your project. That’ll give the user a clear indication that they’ve found what they’re looking for.

You do that using a single # at the start of the line:

## This is the title

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