What's New In GraphQL This Week

This is a special one! Kurt goes over how he federated multiple graphql APIs for his website (https://theworst.dev) and how he added real-time functionality to a federated graph.

#graphql #api

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

What's New In GraphQL This Week
Justen  Hintz

Justen Hintz

1663559281

To-do List App with HTML, CSS and JavaScript

Learn how to create a to-do list app with local storage using HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Build a Todo list application with HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Learn the basics to JavaScript along with some more advanced features such as LocalStorage for saving data to the browser.

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
  <head>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" />
    <title>To Do List With Local Storage</title>
    <!-- Font Awesome Icons -->
    <link
      rel="stylesheet"
      href="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/font-awesome/6.2.0/css/all.min.css"
    />
    <!-- Google Fonts -->
    <link
      href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Poppins:wght@400;500&display=swap"
      rel="stylesheet"
    />
    <!-- Stylesheet -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css" />
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="container">
      <div id="new-task">
        <input type="text" placeholder="Enter The Task Here..." />
        <button id="push">Add</button>
      </div>
      <div id="tasks"></div>
    </div>
    <!-- Script -->
    <script src="script.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

CSS:

* {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
body {
  background-color: #0b87ff;
}
.container {
  width: 90%;
  max-width: 34em;
  position: absolute;
  transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
}
#new-task {
  position: relative;
  background-color: #ffffff;
  padding: 1.8em 1.25em;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  box-shadow: 0 1.25em 1.8em rgba(1, 24, 48, 0.15);
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 9fr 3fr;
  gap: 1em;
}
#new-task input {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-size: 1em;
  border: none;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #d1d3d4;
  padding: 0.8em 0.5em;
  color: #111111;
  font-weight: 500;
}
#new-task input:focus {
  outline: none;
  border-color: #0b87ff;
}
#new-task button {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-weight: 500;
  font-size: 1em;
  background-color: #0b87ff;
  color: #ffffff;
  outline: none;
  border: none;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  cursor: pointer;
}
#tasks {
  background-color: #ffffff;
  position: relative;
  padding: 1.8em 1.25em;
  margin-top: 3.8em;
  width: 100%;
  box-shadow: 0 1.25em 1.8em rgba(1, 24, 48, 0.15);
  border-radius: 0.6em;
}
.task {
  background-color: #ffffff;
  padding: 0.3em 0.6em;
  margin-top: 0.6em;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  border-bottom: 2px solid #d1d3d4;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.task span {
  font-family: "Poppins", sans-serif;
  font-size: 0.9em;
  font-weight: 400;
}
.task button {
  color: #ffffff;
  padding: 0.8em 0;
  width: 2.8em;
  border-radius: 0.3em;
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  cursor: pointer;
}
.delete {
  background-color: #fb3b3b;
}
.edit {
  background-color: #0b87ff;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: 3em;
}
.completed {
  text-decoration: line-through;
}

Javascript:

//Initial References
const newTaskInput = document.querySelector("#new-task input");
const tasksDiv = document.querySelector("#tasks");
let deleteTasks, editTasks, tasks;
let updateNote = "";
let count;

//Function on window load
window.onload = () => {
  updateNote = "";
  count = Object.keys(localStorage).length;
  displayTasks();
};

//Function to Display The Tasks
const displayTasks = () => {
  if (Object.keys(localStorage).length > 0) {
    tasksDiv.style.display = "inline-block";
  } else {
    tasksDiv.style.display = "none";
  }

  //Clear the tasks
  tasksDiv.innerHTML = "";

  //Fetch All The Keys in local storage
  let tasks = Object.keys(localStorage);
  tasks = tasks.sort();

  for (let key of tasks) {
    let classValue = "";

    //Get all values
    let value = localStorage.getItem(key);
    let taskInnerDiv = document.createElement("div");
    taskInnerDiv.classList.add("task");
    taskInnerDiv.setAttribute("id", key);
    taskInnerDiv.innerHTML = `<span id="taskname">${key.split("_")[1]}</span>`;
    //localstorage would store boolean as string so we parse it to boolean back
    let editButton = document.createElement("button");
    editButton.classList.add("edit");
    editButton.innerHTML = `<i class="fa-solid fa-pen-to-square"></i>`;
    if (!JSON.parse(value)) {
      editButton.style.visibility = "visible";
    } else {
      editButton.style.visibility = "hidden";
      taskInnerDiv.classList.add("completed");
    }
    taskInnerDiv.appendChild(editButton);
    taskInnerDiv.innerHTML += `<button class="delete"><i class="fa-solid fa-trash"></i></button>`;
    tasksDiv.appendChild(taskInnerDiv);
  }

  //tasks completed
  tasks = document.querySelectorAll(".task");
  tasks.forEach((element, index) => {
    element.onclick = () => {
      //local storage update
      if (element.classList.contains("completed")) {
        updateStorage(element.id.split("_")[0], element.innerText, false);
      } else {
        updateStorage(element.id.split("_")[0], element.innerText, true);
      }
    };
  });

  //Edit Tasks
  editTasks = document.getElementsByClassName("edit");
  Array.from(editTasks).forEach((element, index) => {
    element.addEventListener("click", (e) => {
      //Stop propogation to outer elements (if removed when we click delete eventually rhw click will move to parent)
      e.stopPropagation();
      //disable other edit buttons when one task is being edited
      disableButtons(true);
      //update input value and remove div
      let parent = element.parentElement;
      newTaskInput.value = parent.querySelector("#taskname").innerText;
      //set updateNote to the task that is being edited
      updateNote = parent.id;
      //remove task
      parent.remove();
    });
  });

  //Delete Tasks
  deleteTasks = document.getElementsByClassName("delete");
  Array.from(deleteTasks).forEach((element, index) => {
    element.addEventListener("click", (e) => {
      e.stopPropagation();
      //Delete from local storage and remove div
      let parent = element.parentElement;
      removeTask(parent.id);
      parent.remove();
      count -= 1;
    });
  });
};

//Disable Edit Button
const disableButtons = (bool) => {
  let editButtons = document.getElementsByClassName("edit");
  Array.from(editButtons).forEach((element) => {
    element.disabled = bool;
  });
};

//Remove Task from local storage
const removeTask = (taskValue) => {
  localStorage.removeItem(taskValue);
  displayTasks();
};

//Add tasks to local storage
const updateStorage = (index, taskValue, completed) => {
  localStorage.setItem(`${index}_${taskValue}`, completed);
  displayTasks();
};

//Function To Add New Task
document.querySelector("#push").addEventListener("click", () => {
  //Enable the edit button
  disableButtons(false);
  if (newTaskInput.value.length == 0) {
    alert("Please Enter A Task");
  } else {
    //Store locally and display from local storage
    if (updateNote == "") {
      //new task
      updateStorage(count, newTaskInput.value, false);
    } else {
      //update task
      let existingCount = updateNote.split("_")[0];
      removeTask(updateNote);
      updateStorage(existingCount, newTaskInput.value, false);
      updateNote = "";
    }
    count += 1;
    newTaskInput.value = "";
  }
});

Related Videos

Build a Todo list app in HTML, CSS & JavaScript | JavaScript for Beginners tutorial

Build a Todo List App in HTML, CSS & JavaScript with LocalStorage | JavaScript for Beginners

To Do List using HTML CSS JavaScript | To Do List JavaScript

Create A Todo List App in HTML CSS & JavaScript | Todo App in JavaScript

#html #css #javascript

Elm Graphql: Autogenerate Type-safe GraphQL Queries in Elm

dillonkearns/elm-graphql  

Why use this package over the other available Elm GraphQL packages? This is the only one that generates type-safe code for your entire schema. Check out this blog post, Type-Safe & Composable GraphQL in Elm, to learn more about the motivation for this library. (It's also the only type-safe library with Elm 0.18 or 0.19 support, see this discourse thread).

I built this package because I wanted to have something that:

  1. Gives you type-safe GraphQL queries (if it compiles, it's valid according to the schema),
  2. Creates decoders for you in a seamless and failsafe way, and
  3. Eliminates GraphQL features in favor of Elm language constructs where possible for a simpler UX (for example, GraphQL variables & fragments should just be Elm functions, constants, lets).

See an example in action on Ellie. See more end-to-end example code in the examples/ folder.

Overview

dillonkearns/elm-graphql is an Elm package and accompanying command-line code generator that creates type-safe Elm code for your GraphQL endpoint. You don't write any decoders for your API with dillonkearns/elm-graphql, instead you simply select which fields you would like, similar to a standard GraphQL query but in Elm. For example, this GraphQL query

query {
  human(id: "1001") {
    name
    homePlanet
  }
}

would look like this in dillonkearns/elm-graphql (the code in this example that is prefixed with StarWars is auto-generated)

import Graphql.Operation exposing (RootQuery)
import Graphql.SelectionSet as SelectionSet exposing (SelectionSet)
import StarWars.Object
import StarWars.Object.Human as Human
import StarWars.Query as Query
import StarWars.Scalar exposing (Id(..))


query : SelectionSet (Maybe HumanData) RootQuery
query =
    Query.human { id = Id "1001" } humanSelection


type alias HumanData =
    { name : String
    , homePlanet : Maybe String
    }


humanSelection : SelectionSet HumanData StarWars.Object.Human
humanSelection =
    SelectionSet.map2 HumanData
        Human.name
        Human.homePlanet

GraphQL and Elm are a perfect match because GraphQL is used to enforce the types that your API takes as inputs and outputs, much like Elm's type system does within Elm. elm-graphql simply bridges this gap by making your Elm code aware of your GraphQL server's schema. If you are new to GraphQL, graphql.org/learn/ is an excellent way to learn the basics.

After following the installation instructions to install the @dillonkearns/elm-graphql NPM package and the proper Elm packages (see the Setup section for details). Once you've installed everything, running the elm-graphql code generation tool is as simple as this:

npx elm-graphql https://elm-graphql.herokuapp.com --base StarWars --output examples/src

If headers are required, such as a Bearer Token, the --header flag can be supplied.

npx elm-graphql https://elm-graphql.herokuapp.com --base StarWars --output examples/src --header 'headerKey: header value'

Learning Resources

There is a thorough tutorial in the SelectionSet docs. SelectionSets are the core concept in this library, so I recommend reading through the whole page (it's not very long!).

The examples/ folder is another great place to start.

If you want to learn more GraphQL basics, this is a great tutorial, and a short read: graphql.org/learn/

My Elm Conf 2018 talk goes into the philosophy behind dillonkearns/elm-graphql

Types Without Borders Elm Conf Talk

(Skip to 13:06 to go straight to the dillonkearns/elm-graphql demo).

If you're wondering why code is generated a certain way, you're likely to find an answer in the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ).

There's a very helpful group of people in the #graphql channel in the Elm Slack. Don't hesitate to ask any questions about getting started, best practices, or just general GraphQL in there!

Setup

dillonkearns/elm-graphql generates Elm code that allows you to build up type-safe GraphQL requests. Here are the steps to setup dillonkearns/elm-graphql.

Add the dillonkearns/elm-graphql elm package as a dependency in your elm.json. You will also need to make sure that elm/json is a dependency of your project since the generated code has lots of JSON decoders in it.

elm install dillonkearns/elm-graphql
elm install elm/json

Install the @dillonkearns/elm-graphql command line tool through npm. This is what you will use to generate Elm code for your API. It is recommended that you save the @dillonkearns/elm-graphql command line tool as a dev dependency so that everyone on your project is using the same version.

npm install --save-dev @dillonkearns/elm-graphql
# you can now run it locally using `npx elm-graphql`,
# or by calling it through an npm script as in this project's package.json

Run the @dillonkearns/elm-graphql command line tool installed above to generate your code. If you used the --save-dev method above, you can simply create a script in your package.json like the following:

{
  "name": "star-wars-elm-graphql-project",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "scripts": {
    "api": "elm-graphql https://elm-graphql.herokuapp.com/api --base StarWars"
  }

With the above in your package.json, running npm run api will generate dillonkearns/elm-graphql code for you to call in ./src/StarWars/. You can now use the generated code as in this Ellie example or in the examples folder.

Subscriptions Support

You can do real-time APIs using GraphQL Subscriptions and dillonkearns/elm-graphql. Just wire in the framework-specific JavaScript code for opening the WebSocket connection through a port. Here's a live demo and its source code. The demo server is running Elixir/Absinthe.

Contributors

Thank you Mario Martinez (martimatix) for all your feedback, the elm-format PR, and for the incredible logo design!

Thank you Mike Stock (mikeastock) for setting up Travis CI!

Thanks for the reserved words pull request @madsflensted!

A huge thanks to @xtian for doing the vast majority of the 0.19 upgrade work! :tada:

Thank you Josh Adams (@knewter) for the code example for Subscriptions with Elixir/Absinthe wired up through Elm ports!

Thank you Romario for adding OptionalArgument.map!

Thank you Aaron White for your pull request to improve the performance and stability of the elm-format step! 🎉

Roadmap

All core features are supported. That is, you can build any query or mutation with your dillonkearns/elm-graphql-generated code, and it is guaranteed to be valid according to your server's schema.

dillonkearns/elm-graphql will generate code for you to generate subscriptions and decode the responses, but it doesn't deal with the low-level details for how to send them over web sockets. To do that, you will need to use custom code or a package that knows how to communicate over websockets (or whichever protocol) to setup a subscription with your particular framework. See this discussion for why those details are not handled by this library directly.

I would love to hear feedback if you are using GraphQL Subscriptions. In particular, I'd love to see live code examples to drive any improvements to the Subscriptions design. Please ping me on Slack, drop a message in the #graphql channel, or open up a Github issue to discuss!

I would like to investigate generating helpers to make pagination simpler for Connections (based on the Relay Cursor Connections Specification). If you have ideas on this chime in on this thread.

See the full roadmap on Trello.


Author: dillonkearns
Source Code: https://github.com/dillonkearns/elm-graphql
License: View license

#graphql 

Stephie John

1606290330

What is ASO for Android & iOS Mobile App?

App Store Optimization is all about improving the visibility of a particular Android /iOS Mobile App on the App Store. Mobile App to optimize? Then go for Best SEO Company in New Zealand

How does ASO Really Work?
ASO is the process of improving the visibility of a mobile app in an app store. Just like search engine optimization (SEO) is for websites, App Store Optimization (ASO) is for mobile apps. Specifically, app store optimization includes the process of ranking highly in an app store’s search results and top charts rankings. Lia Infraservices the Top SEO Company in New Zealand and ASO marketers agrees that ranking higher in search results and top charts rankings will drive more downloads for an app.

ASO Focus on 2 Areas:
A. Search Optimization
B. Behavioral Approach

  1. Search Optimization:
    This part of App Store Optimization focuses on adjusting the name of the app and its keywords. When it comes to SEO services in New Zealand, each app is described by keywords, packed into a 100 character string. These keywords affect search rankings. The better the keywords, the higher the possibility for the app to appear in App Store search results.

/The more often the app appears in search results = the more installs /

Note: The app name is the strongest key phrase.

5 point method to Choose Keywords:
1.Create a list of general keywords based on the app description.
2.Find the Top 5 apps that target the already selected keywords.
3.Find keywords that work best for each of the 5 apps.
4.Now you should have created quite a large list of keywords. Get rid of those which don’t fit your app.
5.Create 100 characters, a comma separated string that contains the best keywords you chose.

  1. Behavioural Approach:
    App Store Optimization is not only about adjusting towards search algorithms, it’s also about human behavior. There are several areas on the Android/iOS Mobile App Store that trigger human decisions to make an install or to abandon it. These are the most important for us:

a.Application name
b.Rating
c.Screenshots / video preview
d.App description

Is your Mobile App Optimized?
When it comes to app downloads and revenue, approach the SEO Company in New Zealand, your app will do much better almost immediately after optimization. If you are interested in learning what the other factors that influence building an organic increase of app popularity are, you should get your mobile app developed by the expert SEO agency in New Zealand. Build your Android & iOS app at Lia Infraservices at cost and time effective.

#seo company in new zealand #seo services in new zealand #seo agency in new zealand #top seo company in new zealand #best seo company in new zealand #top digital marketing company in new zealand

Best App Development Companies in New York

Are you looking for a top mobile app development company in New York? Please find a list of the Best App Development Companies in New York that help to build high-quality, Robust, high-performance mobile app with advanced technology and features at an affordable price.

#best app development companies in new york #top app development companies in new york #custom app development companies in new york #leading app development companies in new york #app development companies in new york

Delbert  Ferry

Delbert Ferry

1622105190

How to use GraphQL with Javascript – GraphQL.js tutorial

One of the fastest ways to get up and running with GraphQL is to install Apollo Server as middleware on your new or existing HTTP server.

In this short post, we demonstrate how to use Apollo Server to create a GraphQL server with Express.js using the [apollo-server-express] package. At the end, we’ll discuss the tradeoffs of this approach.

#graphql #javascript #graphql.js #graphql.js tutorial