Yvonne  Hickle

Yvonne Hickle

1662532200

A Testing Library Designed To Stub Your Network Requests Easily/Swift

OHHTTPStubs

OHHTTPStubs is a library designed to stub your network requests very easily. It can help you:

  • test your apps with fake network data (stubbed from file) and simulate slow networks, to check your application behavior in bad network conditions
  • write unit tests that use fake network data from your fixtures.

It works with NSURLConnection, NSURLSession, AFNetworking, Alamofire or any networking framework that use Cocoa's URL Loading System.


Documentation & Usage Examples

OHHTTPStubs headers are fully documented using Appledoc-like / Headerdoc-like comments in the header files. You can also read the online documentation here.

Basic example

In Objective-C

[HTTPStubs stubRequestsPassingTest:^BOOL(NSURLRequest *request) {
  return [request.URL.host isEqualToString:@"mywebservice.com"];
} withStubResponse:^HTTPStubsResponse*(NSURLRequest *request) {
  // Stub it with our "wsresponse.json" stub file (which is in same bundle as self)
  NSString* fixture = OHPathForFile(@"wsresponse.json", self.class);
  return [HTTPStubsResponse responseWithFileAtPath:fixture
            statusCode:200 headers:@{@"Content-Type":@"application/json"}];
}];

In Swift

This example is using the Swift helpers found in OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift provided by the OHHTTPStubs/Swift subspec or OHHTTPStubs package.

stub(condition: isHost("mywebservice.com")) { _ in
  // Stub it with our "wsresponse.json" stub file (which is in same bundle as self)
  let stubPath = OHPathForFile("wsresponse.json", type(of: self))
  return fixture(filePath: stubPath!, headers: ["Content-Type":"application/json"])
}

Note: if you're using OHHTTPStubs's Swiftier API (OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift and the Swift subspec or OHTTPStubsSwift package), you can also compose the matcher functions like this: stub(isScheme("http") && isHost("myhost")) { … }

More examples & Help Topics

Recording requests to replay them later

Instead of writing the content of the stubs you want to use manually, you can use tools like SWHttpTrafficRecorder to record network requests into files. This way you can later use those files as stub responses.
This tool can record all three formats that are supported by OHHTTPStubs (the HTTPMessage format, the simple response boby/content file, and the Mocktail format).

(There are also other ways to perform a similar task, including using curl -is <url> >foo.response to generate files compatible with the HTTPMessage format, or using other network recording libraries similar to SWHttpTrafficRecorder).

Compatibility

  • OHHTTPStubs is compatible with iOS5+, OS X 10.7+, tvOS.
  • OHHTTPStubs also works with NSURLSession as well as any network library wrapping them.
  • OHHTTPStubs is fully compatible with Swift 3.x, 4.x and Swift 5.x.

Nullability annotations have also been added to the ObjC API to allow a cleaner API when used from Swift even if you don't use the dedicated Swift API wrapper provided by OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift.

Updating to Version 9.0+

  • All classes dropped the OH prefix (OHHHTTPStubs -> HTTPStubs, OHHTTPStubsResponse -> HTTPStubsResponse, etc).
  • The OHPathHelpers class was renamed HTTPStubsPathHelpers.
  • No method and module names were changed.

Installing in your projects

CocoaPods

Using CocoaPods is the recommended way.

  • If you intend to use OHHTTPStubs from Objective-C only, add pod 'OHHTTPStubs' to your Podfile.
  • If you intend to use OHHTTPStubs from Swift, add pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift' to your Podfile instead.
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift' # includes the Default subspec, with support for NSURLSession & JSON, and the Swiftier API wrappers

All available subspecs

OHHTTPStubs is split into subspecs so that when using Cocoapods, you can get only what you need, no more, no less.

  • The default subspec includes NSURLSession, JSON, and OHPathHelpers
  • The Swift subspec adds the Swiftier API to that default subspec
  • HTTPMessage and Mocktail are opt-in subspecs: list them explicitly if you need them
  • OHPathHelpers doesn't depend on Core and can be used independently of OHHTTPStubs altogether

List of all the subspecs & their dependencies

Here's a list of which subspecs are included for each of the different lines you could use in your Podfile:

SubspecCoreNSURLSessionJSONSwiftOHPathHelpersHTTPMessageMocktail
pod 'OHHTTPStubs'   
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Default'   
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift'  
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Core'      
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/NSURLSession'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/JSON'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/OHPathHelpers'      
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/HTTPMessage'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Mocktail'     

Swift Package Manager

OHHTTPStubs is compatible with Swift Package Manager, and provides 2 targets for consumption: OHHTTPStubs and OHHTTPStubsSwift.

  • OHHTTPStubs is equivalent to the OHHTTPStubs subspec.
  • OHHTTPStubsSwift is equivalent to the OHHTTPStubs/Swift subspec.

Note: We currently do not have support for the HTTPMessage or Mocktail subspecs in Swift Package Manager. If you are interested in these, please open an issue to explain your needs.

Carthage

OHHTTPStubs is also compatible with Carthage. Just add it to your Cartfile.

Note: The OHHTTPStubs.framework built with Carthage will include all features of OHHTTPStubs turned on (in other words, all subspecs of the pod), including NSURLSession and JSON support, OHPathHelpers, HTTPMessage and Mocktail support, and the Swiftier API.

Using the right Swift version for your project

OHHTTPStubs supports Swift 3.0 (Xcode 8+), Swift 3.1 (Xcode 8.3+), Swift 3.2 (Xcode 9.0+), Swift 4.0 (Xcode 9.0+), Swift 4.1 (Xcode 9.3+), Swift 4.2 (Xcode 10+), Swift 5.0 (Xcode 10.2), and Swift 5.1 (Xcode 11) however we are only testing Swift 4.x (using Xcode 9.1 and 10.1) and Swift 5.x (using Xcode 10.2 AND 11) in CI.

Here are some details about the correct setup you need depending on how you integrated OHHTTPStubs into your project.

CocoaPods: nothing to do

If you use CocoaPods version 1.1.0.beta.1 or later, then CocoaPods will compile OHHTTPStubs with the right Swift Version matching the one you use for your project automatically. You have nothing to do! 🎉

For more info, see CocoaPods/CocoaPods#5540 and CocoaPods/CocoaPods#5760.

Carthage: choose the right version

The project is set up with SWIFT_VERSION=5.0 on master.

This means that the framework on master will build using:

  • Swift 5.1 on Xcode 11
  • Swift 5.0 on Xcode 10.2
  • Swift 4.2 on Xcode 10.1
  • Swift 4.0 on Xcode 9.1

If you want Carthage to build the framework with Swift 3.x you can:

  • either use an older Xcode version
  • or use the previous version of OHHTTPStubs (6.2.0) — whose master branch uses 3.0
  • or fork the repo just to change the SWIFT_VERSION build setting to 3.0
  • or build the framework passing a SWIFT_VERSION to carthage via XCODE_XCCONFIG_FILE=<config file declaring SWIFT_VERSION> carthage build

Special Considerations

Using OHHTTPStubs in your unit tests

OHHTTPStubs is ideal to write unit tests that normally would perform network requests. But if you use it in your unit tests, don't forget to:

  • remove any stubs you installed after each test — to avoid those stubs to still be installed when executing the next Test Case — by calling [HTTPStubs removeAllStubs] in your tearDown method. see this wiki page for more info
  • be sure to wait until the request has received its response before doing your assertions and letting the test case finish (like for any asynchronous test). see this wiki page for more info

Automatic loading

OHHTTPStubs is automatically loaded and installed (at the time the library is loaded in memory), both for:

  • requests made using NSURLConnection or [NSURLSession sharedSession]thanks to this code
  • requests made using a NSURLSession that was created via [NSURLSession sessionWithConfiguration:…] and using either [NSURLSessionConfiguration defaultSessionConfiguration] or [NSURLSessionConfiguration ephemeralSessionConfiguration] configuration — thanks to method swizzling done here in the code.

If you need to disable (and re-enable) OHHTTPStubs — globally or per NSURLSession — you can use [HTTPStubs setEnabled:] / [HTTPStubs setEnabled:forSessionConfiguration:].

Known limitations

  • OHHTTPStubs can't work on background sessions (sessions created using [NSURLSessionConfiguration backgroundSessionConfiguration]) because background sessions don't allow the use of custom NSURLProtocols and are handled by the iOS Operating System itself.
  • OHHTTPStubs don't simulate data upload. The NSURLProtocolClient @protocol does not provide a way to signal the delegate that data has been sent (only that some has been loaded), so any data in the HTTPBody or HTTPBodyStream of an NSURLRequest, or data provided to -[NSURLSession uploadTaskWithRequest:fromData:]; will be ignored, and more importantly, the -URLSession:task:didSendBodyData:totalBytesSent:totalBytesExpectedToSend: delegate method will never be called when you stub the request using OHHTTPStubs.
  • OHTTPStubs has a known issue with redirects that we believe is an Apple bug. It has been discussed here and here. The actual result of this bug is that redirects with a zero second delay may nondeterministically end up with a null response.

As far as I know, there's nothing we can do about those three limitations. Please let me know if you know a solution that would make that possible anyway.

Submitting to the App Store

OHHTTPStubs can be used on apps submitted on the App Store. It does not use any private API and nothing prevents you from shipping it.

But you generally only use stubs during the development phase and want to remove your stubs when submitting to the App Store. So be careful to only include OHHTTPStubs when needed (only in your test targets, or only inside #if DEBUG sections, or by using per-Build-Configuration pods) to avoid forgetting to remove it when the time comes that you release for the App Store and you want your requests to hit the real network!

License and Credits

This project and library has been created by Olivier Halligon (@aligatr on Twitter) and is under the MIT License.

It has been inspired by this article from InfiniteLoop.dk.

I would also like to thank:

  • Sébastien Duperron (@Liquidsoul) for helping me maintaining this library, triaging and responding to issues and PRs
  • Kevin Harwood (@kcharwood) for migrating the code to NSInputStream
  • Jinlian Wang (@JinlianWang) for adding Mocktail support
  • and everyone else who contributed to this project on GitHub somehow.

If you want to support the development of this library, feel free to. Thanks to all contributors so far!


Download Details:

Author: AliSoftware
Source code: https://github.com/AliSoftware/OHHTTPStubs

License: MIT license
#swift #objective-c 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A Testing Library Designed To Stub Your Network Requests Easily/Swift
Yvonne  Hickle

Yvonne Hickle

1662532200

A Testing Library Designed To Stub Your Network Requests Easily/Swift

OHHTTPStubs

OHHTTPStubs is a library designed to stub your network requests very easily. It can help you:

  • test your apps with fake network data (stubbed from file) and simulate slow networks, to check your application behavior in bad network conditions
  • write unit tests that use fake network data from your fixtures.

It works with NSURLConnection, NSURLSession, AFNetworking, Alamofire or any networking framework that use Cocoa's URL Loading System.


Documentation & Usage Examples

OHHTTPStubs headers are fully documented using Appledoc-like / Headerdoc-like comments in the header files. You can also read the online documentation here.

Basic example

In Objective-C

[HTTPStubs stubRequestsPassingTest:^BOOL(NSURLRequest *request) {
  return [request.URL.host isEqualToString:@"mywebservice.com"];
} withStubResponse:^HTTPStubsResponse*(NSURLRequest *request) {
  // Stub it with our "wsresponse.json" stub file (which is in same bundle as self)
  NSString* fixture = OHPathForFile(@"wsresponse.json", self.class);
  return [HTTPStubsResponse responseWithFileAtPath:fixture
            statusCode:200 headers:@{@"Content-Type":@"application/json"}];
}];

In Swift

This example is using the Swift helpers found in OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift provided by the OHHTTPStubs/Swift subspec or OHHTTPStubs package.

stub(condition: isHost("mywebservice.com")) { _ in
  // Stub it with our "wsresponse.json" stub file (which is in same bundle as self)
  let stubPath = OHPathForFile("wsresponse.json", type(of: self))
  return fixture(filePath: stubPath!, headers: ["Content-Type":"application/json"])
}

Note: if you're using OHHTTPStubs's Swiftier API (OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift and the Swift subspec or OHTTPStubsSwift package), you can also compose the matcher functions like this: stub(isScheme("http") && isHost("myhost")) { … }

More examples & Help Topics

Recording requests to replay them later

Instead of writing the content of the stubs you want to use manually, you can use tools like SWHttpTrafficRecorder to record network requests into files. This way you can later use those files as stub responses.
This tool can record all three formats that are supported by OHHTTPStubs (the HTTPMessage format, the simple response boby/content file, and the Mocktail format).

(There are also other ways to perform a similar task, including using curl -is <url> >foo.response to generate files compatible with the HTTPMessage format, or using other network recording libraries similar to SWHttpTrafficRecorder).

Compatibility

  • OHHTTPStubs is compatible with iOS5+, OS X 10.7+, tvOS.
  • OHHTTPStubs also works with NSURLSession as well as any network library wrapping them.
  • OHHTTPStubs is fully compatible with Swift 3.x, 4.x and Swift 5.x.

Nullability annotations have also been added to the ObjC API to allow a cleaner API when used from Swift even if you don't use the dedicated Swift API wrapper provided by OHHTTPStubsSwift.swift.

Updating to Version 9.0+

  • All classes dropped the OH prefix (OHHHTTPStubs -> HTTPStubs, OHHTTPStubsResponse -> HTTPStubsResponse, etc).
  • The OHPathHelpers class was renamed HTTPStubsPathHelpers.
  • No method and module names were changed.

Installing in your projects

CocoaPods

Using CocoaPods is the recommended way.

  • If you intend to use OHHTTPStubs from Objective-C only, add pod 'OHHTTPStubs' to your Podfile.
  • If you intend to use OHHTTPStubs from Swift, add pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift' to your Podfile instead.
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift' # includes the Default subspec, with support for NSURLSession & JSON, and the Swiftier API wrappers

All available subspecs

OHHTTPStubs is split into subspecs so that when using Cocoapods, you can get only what you need, no more, no less.

  • The default subspec includes NSURLSession, JSON, and OHPathHelpers
  • The Swift subspec adds the Swiftier API to that default subspec
  • HTTPMessage and Mocktail are opt-in subspecs: list them explicitly if you need them
  • OHPathHelpers doesn't depend on Core and can be used independently of OHHTTPStubs altogether

List of all the subspecs & their dependencies

Here's a list of which subspecs are included for each of the different lines you could use in your Podfile:

SubspecCoreNSURLSessionJSONSwiftOHPathHelpersHTTPMessageMocktail
pod 'OHHTTPStubs'   
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Default'   
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Swift'  
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Core'      
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/NSURLSession'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/JSON'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/OHPathHelpers'      
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/HTTPMessage'     
pod 'OHHTTPStubs/Mocktail'     

Swift Package Manager

OHHTTPStubs is compatible with Swift Package Manager, and provides 2 targets for consumption: OHHTTPStubs and OHHTTPStubsSwift.

  • OHHTTPStubs is equivalent to the OHHTTPStubs subspec.
  • OHHTTPStubsSwift is equivalent to the OHHTTPStubs/Swift subspec.

Note: We currently do not have support for the HTTPMessage or Mocktail subspecs in Swift Package Manager. If you are interested in these, please open an issue to explain your needs.

Carthage

OHHTTPStubs is also compatible with Carthage. Just add it to your Cartfile.

Note: The OHHTTPStubs.framework built with Carthage will include all features of OHHTTPStubs turned on (in other words, all subspecs of the pod), including NSURLSession and JSON support, OHPathHelpers, HTTPMessage and Mocktail support, and the Swiftier API.

Using the right Swift version for your project

OHHTTPStubs supports Swift 3.0 (Xcode 8+), Swift 3.1 (Xcode 8.3+), Swift 3.2 (Xcode 9.0+), Swift 4.0 (Xcode 9.0+), Swift 4.1 (Xcode 9.3+), Swift 4.2 (Xcode 10+), Swift 5.0 (Xcode 10.2), and Swift 5.1 (Xcode 11) however we are only testing Swift 4.x (using Xcode 9.1 and 10.1) and Swift 5.x (using Xcode 10.2 AND 11) in CI.

Here are some details about the correct setup you need depending on how you integrated OHHTTPStubs into your project.

CocoaPods: nothing to do

If you use CocoaPods version 1.1.0.beta.1 or later, then CocoaPods will compile OHHTTPStubs with the right Swift Version matching the one you use for your project automatically. You have nothing to do! 🎉

For more info, see CocoaPods/CocoaPods#5540 and CocoaPods/CocoaPods#5760.

Carthage: choose the right version

The project is set up with SWIFT_VERSION=5.0 on master.

This means that the framework on master will build using:

  • Swift 5.1 on Xcode 11
  • Swift 5.0 on Xcode 10.2
  • Swift 4.2 on Xcode 10.1
  • Swift 4.0 on Xcode 9.1

If you want Carthage to build the framework with Swift 3.x you can:

  • either use an older Xcode version
  • or use the previous version of OHHTTPStubs (6.2.0) — whose master branch uses 3.0
  • or fork the repo just to change the SWIFT_VERSION build setting to 3.0
  • or build the framework passing a SWIFT_VERSION to carthage via XCODE_XCCONFIG_FILE=<config file declaring SWIFT_VERSION> carthage build

Special Considerations

Using OHHTTPStubs in your unit tests

OHHTTPStubs is ideal to write unit tests that normally would perform network requests. But if you use it in your unit tests, don't forget to:

  • remove any stubs you installed after each test — to avoid those stubs to still be installed when executing the next Test Case — by calling [HTTPStubs removeAllStubs] in your tearDown method. see this wiki page for more info
  • be sure to wait until the request has received its response before doing your assertions and letting the test case finish (like for any asynchronous test). see this wiki page for more info

Automatic loading

OHHTTPStubs is automatically loaded and installed (at the time the library is loaded in memory), both for:

  • requests made using NSURLConnection or [NSURLSession sharedSession]thanks to this code
  • requests made using a NSURLSession that was created via [NSURLSession sessionWithConfiguration:…] and using either [NSURLSessionConfiguration defaultSessionConfiguration] or [NSURLSessionConfiguration ephemeralSessionConfiguration] configuration — thanks to method swizzling done here in the code.

If you need to disable (and re-enable) OHHTTPStubs — globally or per NSURLSession — you can use [HTTPStubs setEnabled:] / [HTTPStubs setEnabled:forSessionConfiguration:].

Known limitations

  • OHHTTPStubs can't work on background sessions (sessions created using [NSURLSessionConfiguration backgroundSessionConfiguration]) because background sessions don't allow the use of custom NSURLProtocols and are handled by the iOS Operating System itself.
  • OHHTTPStubs don't simulate data upload. The NSURLProtocolClient @protocol does not provide a way to signal the delegate that data has been sent (only that some has been loaded), so any data in the HTTPBody or HTTPBodyStream of an NSURLRequest, or data provided to -[NSURLSession uploadTaskWithRequest:fromData:]; will be ignored, and more importantly, the -URLSession:task:didSendBodyData:totalBytesSent:totalBytesExpectedToSend: delegate method will never be called when you stub the request using OHHTTPStubs.
  • OHTTPStubs has a known issue with redirects that we believe is an Apple bug. It has been discussed here and here. The actual result of this bug is that redirects with a zero second delay may nondeterministically end up with a null response.

As far as I know, there's nothing we can do about those three limitations. Please let me know if you know a solution that would make that possible anyway.

Submitting to the App Store

OHHTTPStubs can be used on apps submitted on the App Store. It does not use any private API and nothing prevents you from shipping it.

But you generally only use stubs during the development phase and want to remove your stubs when submitting to the App Store. So be careful to only include OHHTTPStubs when needed (only in your test targets, or only inside #if DEBUG sections, or by using per-Build-Configuration pods) to avoid forgetting to remove it when the time comes that you release for the App Store and you want your requests to hit the real network!

License and Credits

This project and library has been created by Olivier Halligon (@aligatr on Twitter) and is under the MIT License.

It has been inspired by this article from InfiniteLoop.dk.

I would also like to thank:

  • Sébastien Duperron (@Liquidsoul) for helping me maintaining this library, triaging and responding to issues and PRs
  • Kevin Harwood (@kcharwood) for migrating the code to NSInputStream
  • Jinlian Wang (@JinlianWang) for adding Mocktail support
  • and everyone else who contributed to this project on GitHub somehow.

If you want to support the development of this library, feel free to. Thanks to all contributors so far!


Download Details:

Author: AliSoftware
Source code: https://github.com/AliSoftware/OHHTTPStubs

License: MIT license
#swift #objective-c 

Tamia  Walter

Tamia Walter

1596754901

Testing Microservices Applications

The shift towards microservices and modular applications makes testing more important and more challenging at the same time. You have to make sure that the microservices running in containers perform well and as intended, but you can no longer rely on conventional testing strategies to get the job done.

This is where new testing approaches are needed. Testing your microservices applications require the right approach, a suitable set of tools, and immense attention to details. This article will guide you through the process of testing your microservices and talk about the challenges you will have to overcome along the way. Let’s get started, shall we?

A Brave New World

Traditionally, testing a monolith application meant configuring a test environment and setting up all of the application components in a way that matched the production environment. It took time to set up the testing environment, and there were a lot of complexities around the process.

Testing also requires the application to run in full. It is not possible to test monolith apps on a per-component basis, mainly because there is usually a base code that ties everything together, and the app is designed to run as a complete app to work properly.

Microservices running in containers offer one particular advantage: universal compatibility. You don’t have to match the testing environment with the deployment architecture exactly, and you can get away with testing individual components rather than the full app in some situations.

Of course, you will have to embrace the new cloud-native approach across the pipeline. Rather than creating critical dependencies between microservices, you need to treat each one as a semi-independent module.

The only monolith or centralized portion of the application is the database, but this too is an easy challenge to overcome. As long as you have a persistent database running on your test environment, you can perform tests at any time.

Keep in mind that there are additional things to focus on when testing microservices.

  • Microservices rely on network communications to talk to each other, so network reliability and requirements must be part of the testing.
  • Automation and infrastructure elements are now added as codes, and you have to make sure that they also run properly when microservices are pushed through the pipeline
  • While containerization is universal, you still have to pay attention to specific dependencies and create a testing strategy that allows for those dependencies to be included

Test containers are the method of choice for many developers. Unlike monolith apps, which lets you use stubs and mocks for testing, microservices need to be tested in test containers. Many CI/CD pipelines actually integrate production microservices as part of the testing process.

Contract Testing as an Approach

As mentioned before, there are many ways to test microservices effectively, but the one approach that developers now use reliably is contract testing. Loosely coupled microservices can be tested in an effective and efficient way using contract testing, mainly because this testing approach focuses on contracts; in other words, it focuses on how components or microservices communicate with each other.

Syntax and semantics construct how components communicate with each other. By defining syntax and semantics in a standardized way and testing microservices based on their ability to generate the right message formats and meet behavioral expectations, you can rest assured knowing that the microservices will behave as intended when deployed.

Ways to Test Microservices

It is easy to fall into the trap of making testing microservices complicated, but there are ways to avoid this problem. Testing microservices doesn’t have to be complicated at all when you have the right strategy in place.

There are several ways to test microservices too, including:

  • Unit testing: Which allows developers to test microservices in a granular way. It doesn’t limit testing to individual microservices, but rather allows developers to take a more granular approach such as testing individual features or runtimes.
  • Integration testing: Which handles the testing of microservices in an interactive way. Microservices still need to work with each other when they are deployed, and integration testing is a key process in making sure that they do.
  • End-to-end testing: Which⁠—as the name suggests⁠—tests microservices as a complete app. This type of testing enables the testing of features, UI, communications, and other components that construct the app.

What’s important to note is the fact that these testing approaches allow for asynchronous testing. After all, asynchronous development is what makes developing microservices very appealing in the first place. By allowing for asynchronous testing, you can also make sure that components or microservices can be updated independently to one another.

#blog #microservices #testing #caylent #contract testing #end-to-end testing #hoverfly #integration testing #microservices #microservices architecture #pact #testing #unit testing #vagrant #vcr

Landscapes Website Design | Nature Landscapes Website Designer

Most landscapers think of their website as an online brochure. In reality of consumers have admitted to judging a company’s credibility based on their web design, making your website a virtual sales rep capable of generating massive amounts of leads and sales. If your website isn’t actively increasing leads and new landscaping contracts, it may be time for a redesign.

DataIT Solutions specializes in landscape website designing that are not only beautiful but also rank well in search engine results and convert your visitors into customers. We’ve specialized in the landscaping industry for over 10 years, and we look at your business from an owner’s perspective.

Why use our Landscapes for your landscape design?

  • Superior experience
  • Friendly personal service
  • Choice of design layout
  • Budget sensitive designs
  • Impartial product choice and advice
  • Planting and lighting designs

Want to talk about your website?
If you are a gardener or have a gardening company please do not hesitate to contact us for a quote.
Need help with your website?
Get in touch

#nature landscapes website design #landscapes website design #website design #website designing #website designer #designer

Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1600430400

10 Free Online Resources To Learn Swift Language

Swift is a fast and efficient general-purpose programming language that provides real-time feedback and can be seamlessly incorporated into existing Objective-C code. This is why developers are able to write safer, more reliable code while saving time. It aims to be the best language that can be used for various purposes ranging from systems programming to mobile as well as desktop apps and scaling up to cloud services.

Below here, we list down the 10 best online resources to learn Swift language.

(The list is in no particular order)

#developers corner #free online resources to learn swift language #learn swift #learn swift free #learn swift online free #resources to learn swift #swift language #swift programming

Software Testing 101: Regression Tests, Unit Tests, Integration Tests

Automation and segregation can help you build better software
If you write automated tests and deliver them to the customer, he can make sure the software is working properly. And, at the end of the day, he paid for it.

Ok. We can segregate or separate the tests according to some criteria. For example, “white box” tests are used to measure the internal quality of the software, in addition to the expected results. They are very useful to know the percentage of lines of code executed, the cyclomatic complexity and several other software metrics. Unit tests are white box tests.

#testing #software testing #regression tests #unit tests #integration tests