Daisy Rees

Daisy Rees

1567237038

Get Started with Angular Grid

Originally published at https://www.ag-grid.com

The "ag" part of ag-Grid stands for "agnostic". The internal ag-Grid engine is implemented in TypeScript with zero dependencies. ag-Grid supports Angular through a wrapper component. The wrapper lets you use ag-Grid in your application like any other Angular component – you pass configuration through property bindings and handle events through event bindings. You can even use Angular components to customize the grid UI and cell contents / behavior.

Table of Contents

  1. Add ag-Grid to Your Project
  2. Enable Sorting and Filtering
  3. Fetch Remote Data
  4. Enable Selection
  5. Grouping(Enterprise)
  6. Customize the Theme Look
  7. Summary

Add ag-Grid to Your Project

For the purposes of this tutorial, we are going to scaffold an Angular app with angular CLI. Don't worry if your project has a different configuration. ag-Grid and its Angular wrapper are distributed as NPM packages, which should work with any common Angular project module bundler setup. Let's follow the Angular CLI instructions - run the following in your terminal:

npm install -g @angular/cli
ng new my-app --style scss --routing false
cd my-app
ng serve

npm install -g @angular/cling new my-app --style scss --routing false cd my-app ng serve  

f everything goes well, ng serve has started the web server. You can open your app at localhost:4200.

As a next step, let's add the ag-Grid NPM packages. run the following command in my-app (you may need a new instance of the terminal):

npm install --save ag-grid-community ag-grid-angular
npm install # in certain circumstances npm will perform an "auto prune". This step ensures all expected dependencies are present

After a few seconds of waiting, you should be good to go. Let's get to the actual coding! As a first step, let's add the ag-Grid Angular module to our app module (src/app/app.module.ts):

import { BrowserModule } from '@angular/platform-browser';
import { NgModule } from '@angular/core';

import { AppComponent } from ‘./app.component’;
import { AgGridModule } from ‘ag-grid-angular’;

@NgModule({
  declarations: [AppComponent],
  imports: [
    BrowserModule,
    AgGridModule.withComponents([])
  ],
  providers: [],
  bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule {}

The withComponents call is necessary for the grid to be able to use Angular components as cells / headers - you can ignore it for now.

The next step is to add the ag-Grid styles - import them in styles.scss:

@import “~ag-grid-community/dist/styles/ag-grid.css”;
@import “~ag-grid-community/dist/styles/ag-theme-balham.css”;

The code above imports the grid “structure” stylesheet (ag-grid.css), and one of the available grid themes: (ag-theme-balham.css). The grid ships several different themes; pick one that matches your project design. You can customize it further with Sass variables, a technique which we will cover further down the road.

Next, let’s declare the basic grid configuration. Edit src/app.component.ts:

import { Component } from ‘@angular/core’;

@Component({
    selector: ‘app-root’,
    templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,
    styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]
})
export class AppComponent {
    title = ‘app’;

    columnDefs = [
        {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’ },
        {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’ },
        {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’}
    ];

    rowData = [
        { make: ‘Toyota’, model: ‘Celica’, price: 35000 },
        { make: ‘Ford’, model: ‘Mondeo’, price: 32000 },
        { make: ‘Porsche’, model: ‘Boxter’, price: 72000 }
    ];
}

The code above presents two essential configuration properties of the grid - the column definitions (columnDefs) and the data (rowData). In our case, the column definitions contain three columns; each column entry specifies the header label and the data field to be displayed in the body of the table.

Finally, let’s add the component definition to our template. Edit app/app.component.html and remove the scaffold code:

<ag-grid-angular 
    style=“width: 500px; height: 500px;” 
    class=“ag-theme-balham”
    [rowData]=“rowData” 
    [columnDefs]=“columnDefs”
    >
</ag-grid-angular>

This is the ag-grid component definition, with two property bindings - rowData and columnDefs. The component also accepts the standard DOM style and class. We have set the class to ag-theme-balham, which defines the grid theme. As you may have already noticed, the CSS class matches the name of CSS file we imported earlier.

If everything works as expected, you should see a simple grid like the one on the screenshot:

Enable Sorting And Filtering

So far, so good. But wouldn’t it be nice to be able to sort the data to help us see which car is the least/most expensive? Well, enabling sorting in ag-Grid is actually quite simple - all you need to do is set the sortable property to each column you want to be able to sort by.

columnDefs = [
   {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true},
   {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true},
   {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true}
];

After adding the property, you should be able to sort the grid by clicking on the column headers. Clicking on a header toggles through ascending, descending and no-sort.

Our application doesn’t have too many rows, so it’s fairly easy to find data. But it’s easy to imagine how a real-world application may have hundreds (or even hundreds of thousands!) or rows, with many columns. In a data set like this filtering is your friend.

As with sorting, enabling filtering is as easy as setting the filter property:

columnDefs = [
   {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true, filter: true},
   {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true, filter: true},
   {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true, filter: true}
];

With this property set, the grid will display a small column menu icon when you hover the header. Pressing it will display a popup with filtering UI which lets you choose the kind of filter and the text that you want to filter by.

Fetch Remote Data

Displaying hard-coded data in JavaScript is not going to get us very far. In the real world, most of the time, we are dealing with data that resides on a remote server. Thanks to Angular, implementing this is actually quite simple. Notice that the actual data fetching is performed outside of the grid component - We are using Angular’s HttpClient and an async pipe. As a first step, let’s add the HttpModule to our app module:

import { BrowserModule } from ‘@angular/platform-browser’;
import { NgModule } from ‘@angular/core’;

import { AppComponent } from ‘./app.component’;
import { AgGridModule } from ‘ag-grid-angular’;
import { HttpClientModule } from ‘@angular/common/http’;

@NgModule({
 declarations: [AppComponent],
 imports: [BrowserModule, HttpClientModule, AgGridModule.withComponents([])],
 providers: [],
 bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})
export class AppModule {}

Now, let’s remove the hard-coded data and fetch one from a remote server. Edit the src/app.component.ts to this:

import { Component, OnInit } from ‘@angular/core’;
import { HttpClient } from ‘@angular/common/http’;

@Component({
   selector: ‘app-root’,
   templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,
   styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]
})
export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
   title = ‘app’;

   columnDefs = [
       {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true, filter: true},
       {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true, filter: true},
       {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true, filter: true}
   ];

   rowData: any;

   constructor(private http: HttpClient) {

   }

   ngOnInit() {
       this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/15psn9’);
   }
}

The above code turns the rowData from a hard-coded array to an Observable. For the grid to work with it, we need to add an async pipe to the property:

<ag-grid-angular
    style=“width: 500px; height: 500px;”
    class=“ag-theme-balham”
    [rowData]=“rowData | async”
    [columnDefs]=“columnDefs”
    >
</ag-grid-angular>

The remote data is the same as the one we initially had, so you should not notice any actual changes to the grid. However, you will see an additional HTTP request performed if you open your developer tools.

Enable Selection

Being a programmer is a hectic job. Just when we thought that we are done with our assignment, the manager shows up with a fresh set of requirements! It turned out that we need to allow the user to select certain rows from the grid and to mark them as flagged in the system. We will leave the flag toggle state and persistence to the backend team. On our side, we should enable the selection and, afterwards, to obtain the selected records and pass them with an API call to a remote service endpoint.

Fortunately, the above task is quite simple with ag-Grid. As you may have already guessed, it is just a matter of adding and changing couple of properties. Edit src/app.component.ts first:

import { Component, OnInit, ViewChild } from ‘@angular/core’;
import { HttpClient } from ‘@angular/common/http’;

@Component({
   selector: ‘app-root’,
   templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,
   styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]
})
export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
   title = ‘app’;

   columnDefs = [
       {headerName: ‘make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true, filter: true, checkboxSelection: true },
       {headerName: ‘model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true, filter: true },
       {headerName: ‘price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true, filter: true }
   ];

   rowData: any;

   constructor(private http: HttpClient) {

   }

   ngOnInit() {
       this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/15psn9’);
   }
}

Next, let’s enable multiple row selection, so that the user can pick many rows:

<ag-grid-angular
    style=“width: 500px; height: 500px;”
    class=“ag-theme-balham”
    [rowData]=“rowData | async”
    [columnDefs]=“columnDefs”
    rowSelection=“multiple”
    >
</ag-grid-angular>

We took a bit of a shortcut here, by not binding the property value. Without [], the assignment will pass the attribute value as a string, which is fine for our purposes.

Great! Now the first column contains a checkbox that, when clicked, selects the row. The only thing we have to add is a button that gets the selected data and sends it to the server. To do this, we are going to use the ag-Grid API - we will access it through the component instance.

<ag-grid-angular
    #agGrid
    style=“width: 500px; height: 500px;”
    class=“ag-theme-balham”
    [rowData]=“rowData | async”
    [columnDefs]=“columnDefs”
    rowSelection=“multiple”
    >
</ag-grid-angular>

Now let’s make the instance accessible in our component:

import { Component, OnInit, ViewChild } from ‘@angular/core’;
import { HttpClient } from ‘@angular/common/http’;
import { AgGridAngular } from ‘ag-grid-angular’;

@Component({
   selector: ‘app-root’,
   templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,
   styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]
})
export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
   @ViewChild(‘agGrid’) agGrid: AgGridAngular;

   title = ‘app’;

   columnDefs = [
       {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true, filter: true, checkboxSelection: true },
       {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true, filter: true },
       {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true, filter: true }
   ];

   rowData: any;

   constructor(private http: HttpClient) {

   }

   ngOnInit() {
       this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/15psn9’);
   }
}

The only thing we have to add is a button that gets the selected data and sends it to the server. To do this, we need the following change:

<button (click)=“getSelectedRows()”>Get Selected Rows</button>

<ag-grid-angular
    #agGrid
    style=“width: 500px; height: 500px;”
    class=“ag-theme-balham”
    [rowData]=“rowData | async”
    [columnDefs]=“columnDefs”
    rowSelection=“multiple”
    >
</ag-grid-angular>
import { Component, OnInit, ViewChild } from ‘@angular/core’;
import { HttpClient } from ‘@angular/common/http’;
import { AgGridAngular } from ‘ag-grid-angular’;

@Component({
   selector: ‘app-root’,
   templateUrl: ‘./app.component.html’,
   styleUrls: [‘./app.component.scss’]
})
export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
   @ViewChild(‘agGrid’) agGrid: AgGridAngular;

   title = ‘app’;

   columnDefs = [
       {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, sortable: true, filter: true, checkboxSelection: true },
       {headerName: ‘Model’, field: ‘model’, sortable: true, filter: true },
       {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’, sortable: true, filter: true }
   ];

   rowData: any;

   constructor(private http: HttpClient) {

   }

   ngOnInit() {
       this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/15psn9’);
   }

   getSelectedRows() {
       const selectedNodes = this.agGrid.api.getSelectedNodes();
       const selectedData = selectedNodes.map( node => node.data );
       const selectedDataStringPresentation = selectedData.map( node => node.make + ’ ’ + node.model).join(', ');
       alert(Selected nodes: ${selectedDataStringPresentation});
   }
}

Well, we cheated a bit. Calling alert is not exactly a call to our backend. Hopefully you will forgive us this shortcut for the sake of keeping the article short and simple. Of course, you can substitute that bit with a real-world application logic after you are done with the tutorial.

Grouping

Grouping is a feature exclusive to ag-Grid Enterprise. You are free to trial ag-Grid Enterprise to see what you think. You only need to get in touch if you want to start using ag-Grid Enterprise in a project intended for production.

In addition to filtering and sorting, grouping is another effective way for the user to make sense out of large amounts of data. In our case, the data is not that much. Let’s switch to a slightly larger data set:

ngOnInit() {
-        this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/15psn9’);
+        this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/ly7d1’);
}

Afterwards, let’s enable the enterprise features of ag-grid. Install the additional package:

npm install --save ag-grid-enterprise

Then, add the import to app.module.ts:

import { AgGridModule } from ‘ag-grid-angular’;
import { HttpClientModule } from ‘@angular/common/http’;

+import ‘ag-grid-enterprise’;

If everything is ok, you should see a message in the console that tells you there is no enterprise license key. You can ignore the message as we are trialing. In addition to that, the grid got a few UI improvements - a custom context menu and fancier column menu popup - feel free to look around:

Now, let’s enable grouping! Add an autoGroupColumnDef property and change the columnDefs to the following:

export class AppComponent implements OnInit {
   @ViewChild(‘agGrid’) agGrid: AgGridAngular;

   title = ‘app’;

   columnDefs = [
       {headerName: ‘Make’, field: ‘make’, rowGroup: true },
       {headerName: ‘Price’, field: ‘price’}
   ];

   autoGroupColumnDef = {
       headerName: ‘Model’,
       field: ‘model’,
       cellRenderer: ‘agGroupCellRenderer’,
       cellRendererParams: {
           checkbox: true
       }
   };

   rowData: any;

   constructor(private http: HttpClient) {

   }

   ngOnInit() {
       this.rowData = this.http.get(‘https://api.myjson.com/bins/ly7d1’);
   }

   getSelectedRows() {
       const selectedNodes = this.agGrid.api.getSelectedNodes();
       const selectedData = selectedNodes.map( node => node.data );
       const selectedDataStringPresentation = selectedData.map( node => node.make + ’ ’ + node.model).join(', ');
       alert(Selected nodes: ${selectedDataStringPresentation});
   }
}

Add the the autoGroupColumnDef property to the template too:

class=“ag-theme-balham”
+[autoGroupColumnDef]=“autoGroupColumnDef”

There we go! The grid now groups the data by make, while listing the model field value when expanded. Notice that grouping works with checkboxes as well - the groupSelectsChildren property adds a group-level checkbox that selects/deselects all items in the group.

Don’t worry if this step feels a bit overwhelming - the grouping feature is very powerful and supports complex interaction scenarios which you might not need initially. The grouping documentation section contains plenty of real-world runnable examples that can get you started for your particular case.

Customize the Theme Look

The last thing which we are going to do is to change the grid look and feel by modifying some of the theme’s Sass variables.

By default, ag-Grid ships a set of pre-built theme stylesheets. If we want to tweak the colors and the fonts of theme, we should add a Sass preprocessor to our project, override the theme variable values, and refer the ag-grid Sass files instead of the pre-built stylesheets so that the variable overrides are applied.

Thankfully, Angular CLI has done most of the heavy lifting for us. Remember that we bootstrapped our project with –style scss? Everything we need to do now is to change the paths in src/styles.scss:

@import “…/node_modules/ag-grid-community/src/styles/ag-grid.scss”;
@import “…/node_modules/ag-grid-community/src/styles/ag-theme-balham/sass/ag-theme-balham.scss”;

Let’s do something simpler, though. We can override the alternating row background color to grayish blue. Add the following line:

+$odd-row-background-color: #CFD8DC;

If everything is configured correctly, the second row of the grid will get slightly darker. Congratulations! You now know now bend the grid look to your will - there are a few dozens more Sass variables that let you control the font family and size, border color, header background color and even the amount of spacing in the cells and columns. The full Sass variable list is available in the themes documentation section.

Summary

With this Angular grid tutorial, we managed to accomplish a lot. Starting from the humble beginnings of a three row / column setup, we now have a grid that supports sorting, filtering, binding to remote data, selection and even grouping! While doing so, we learned how to configure the grid, how to access its API object, and how to change the styling of the component.

Thanks for reading

If you liked this post, share it with all of your programming buddies!

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Further reading

Angular 8 (formerly Angular 2) - The Complete Guide

Angular & NodeJS - The MEAN Stack Guide

The Complete Node.js Developer Course (3rd Edition)

The Web Developer Bootcamp

Best 50 Angular Interview Questions for Frontend Developers in 2019

How to build a CRUD Web App with Angular 8.0

React vs Angular: An In-depth Comparison

React vs Angular vs Vue.js by Example




#angular #javascript #web-development

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Get Started with Angular Grid
Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1598940617

Install Angular - Angular Environment Setup Process

Angular is a TypeScript based framework that works in synchronization with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. To work with angular, domain knowledge of these 3 is required.

  1. Installing Node.js and npm
  2. Installing Angular CLI
  3. Creating workspace
  4. Deploying your First App

In this article, you will get to know about the Angular Environment setup process. After reading this article, you will be able to install, setup, create, and launch your own application in Angular. So let’s start!!!

Angular environment setup

Install Angular in Easy Steps

For Installing Angular on your Machine, there are 2 prerequisites:

  • Node.js
  • npm Package Manager
Node.js

First you need to have Node.js installed as Angular require current, active LTS or maintenance LTS version of Node.js

Download and Install Node.js version suitable for your machine’s operating system.

Npm Package Manager

Angular, Angular CLI and Angular applications are dependent on npm packages. By installing Node.js, you have automatically installed the npm Package manager which will be the base for installing angular in your system. To check the presence of npm client and Angular version check of npm client, run this command:

  1. npm -v

Installing Angular CLI

  • Open Terminal/Command Prompt
  • To install Angular CLI, run the below command:
  1. npm install -g @angular/cli

installing angular CLI

· After executing the command, Angular CLI will get installed within some time. You can check it using the following command

  1. ng --version

Workspace Creation

Now as your Angular CLI is installed, you need to create a workspace to work upon your application. Methods for it are:

  • Using CLI
  • Using Visual Studio Code
1. Using CLI

To create a workspace:

  • Navigate to the desired directory where you want to create your workspace using cd command in the Terminal/Command prompt
  • Then in the directory write this command on your terminal and provide the name of the app which you want to create. In my case I have mentioned DataFlair:
  1. Ng new YourAppName

create angular workspace

  • After running this command, it will prompt you to select from various options about the CSS and other functionalities.

angular CSS options

  • To leave everything to default, simply press the Enter or the Return key.

angular setup

#angular tutorials #angular cli install #angular environment setup #angular version check #download angular #install angular #install angular cli

Clara  Gutmann

Clara Gutmann

1598712540

Angular HttpClient Module | Angular Http GET, POST Example

Angular 9 HttpClient is an inbuilt module that helps us to send network requests to any server. Angular HttpClientModule is used to send GET, POST, PUT, PATCH, and DELETE requests. Angular can consume REST API using the Angular HttpClient module. The latest version of the Angular framework is  Angular 9.

If you are new to Angular 9, then check out my  Angular 9 Tutorial in this blog. Most front-end applications communicate with the backend services over an HTTP protocol. Modern browsers support the two different APIs for making HTTP requests.

  1. XMLHttpRequest interface and the
  2. fetch() API.

We will use XMLHttpRequest for Angular application.

#angular #angular httpclient #angular http #post #get

Roberta  Ward

Roberta Ward

1593184320

Basics of Angular: Part-1

What is Angular? What it does? How we implement it in a project? So, here are some basics of angular to let you learn more about angular.

Angular is a Typescript-based open-source front-end web application platform. The Angular Team at Google and a community of individuals and corporations lead it. Angular lets you extend HTML’s syntax to express your apps’ components clearly. The angular resolves challenges while developing a single page and cross-platform applications. So, here the meaning of the single-page applications in angular is that the index.html file serves the app. And, the index.html file links other files to it.

We build angular applications with basic concepts which are NgModules. It provides a compilation context for components. At the beginning of an angular project, the command-line interface provides a built-in component which is the root component. But, NgModule can add a number of additional components. These can be created through a template or loaded from a router. This is what a compilation context about.

What is a Component in Angular?

Components are key features in Angular. It controls a patch of the screen called a view. A couple of components that we create on our own helps to build a whole application. In the end, the root component or the app component holds our entire application. The component has its business logic that it does to support the view inside the class. The class interacts with the view through an API of properties and methods. All the components added by us in the application are not linked to the index.html. But, they link to the app.component.html through the selectors. A component can be a component and not only a typescript class by adding a decorator @Component. Then, for further access, a class can import it. The decorator contains some metadata like selector, template, and style. Here’s an example of how a component decorator looks like:

@Component({
    selector: 'app-root',
    templateUrl: 'app.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['app.component.scss']
})

Role of App Module

Modules are the package of functionalities of our app. It gives Angular the information about which features does my app has and what feature it uses. It is an empty Typescript class, but we transform it by adding a decorator @NgModule. So, we have four properties that we set up on the object pass to @NgModule. The four properties are declarations, imports, providers, and bootstrap. All the built-in new components add up to the declarations array in @NgModule.

@NgModule({
declarations: [
  AppComponent,
],
imports: [
  BrowserModule,
  HttpClientModule,
  AppRoutingModule,
  FormsModule
],
bootstrap: [AppComponent]
})

What is Data Binding?

Data Binding is the communication between the Typescript code of the component and the template. So, we have different kinds of data binding given below:

  • When there is a requirement to output data from our Typescript code in the HTML template. String interpolation handles this purpose like {{data}} in HTML file. Property Binding is also used for this purpose like [property] = “data”.
  • When we want to trigger any event like clicking a button. Event Binding works while we react to user events like (event) = “expression”.
  • When we can react to user events and output something at the same time. Two-way Binding is used like [(ngModel)] = “data”.

image for understanding data binding

#angular #javascript #tech blogs #user interface (ui) #angular #angular fundamentals #angular tutorial #basics of angular

Ayyaz Zafar

1624138795

Angular Material Autocomplete - Multiple Use Cases covered

Learn How to use Angular Material Autocomplete Suggestions Search Input. I covered multiple use cases.

Please watch this video. I hope this video would be helpful for you to understand it and use it in your projects

Please subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCL5nKCmpReJZZMe9_bYR89w

#angular #angular-material #angular-js #autocomplete #angular-material-autocomplete #angular-tutorial

Mansi Gandhi

Mansi Gandhi

1625232772

Why Choose AngularJS framework for the enterprise? | Angular development Company - CMARIX

Although Angular JS has bought headlines over the domain of Web application development, its relevance downtime does not offer any guarantee. Since the JavaScript application is the child of Google, its web features may have some value. Angular JS enables the developer to write most of the code in HTML which brings the application together. Such potentiality and simplicity of the program from the Angular Development Company made Angular popular among JavaScripts.

But the real question arises on the integrity and the safety Angular can provide to the industry. Angular regularly updates its libraries to fix security issues over earlier versions. However, the private and customized Angular versions fall back from the latest versions. These versions might lack the crucial security patches. As a piece of advice, developers can share their improvement requests in the community.

Backward compatibility indicates that the updated versions can function with the outdated versions. Hence, it can simplify the migration procedures to the latest Angular version. Some portions of the AngularJS apps need lazy loading to ease the update and to facilitate the transfer of large projects.

Since AngularJS tends to spoil backward compatibility, it might cause future problems in a program.

The Changing Face of Frameworks

There were several ups and downs in the Web application market over the past. A few years ago, SproutCore ruled the throne as a top framework. However, according to Google search trends, BackboneJS later stole the spotlight which again passed over to EmberJS. But, there remains no comparison for AngularJS.

Birthed by Adam Abrons and Misko Hevery, the Brat Tech engineers in 2009, the Angular Development Company AngularJS took a swift transition to open-source. When Misko Hevery joined Google, he continued to develop Angular JS. The platform began to earn its place by December of 2012 according to Google Trends.

In the year 2015, the potential of AngularJS surpassed other frameworks and offered job placements for many developers. However, AngularJS is not entirely without competition as Facebook came up with ReactJS. Hence, there is a race to show which surpasses the other. But, according to Jeff Schroeder, among the native apps, React elevates mobile app development to higher levels.

Continuous Development in Angular JS

AngularJS has high popularity yet, the developers break backward compatibility on a regular basis. Therefore, the supporters of AngularJS have to learn the AngularJS framework again and again. A critic of AngularJS – Danny Tuppeny, points out that the framework is unstable as it offers short-term support. The developers develop the framework every now and then which can puzzle its users. However, a mobile Web developer by the name of Nene Bodonkor indicates another factor. The frameworks become satisfactory and since they fail to keep up with the market requirements, change becomes crucial.

On the contrary, Yehuda Katz, the creator of EmberJS suggests that the fast-paced lifestyle needs to slow down. Therefore, these constant changes can compel people to reduce and balance their pace. Both, ReactJS from Facebook and EmberJS fight to achieve maximum backward compatibility. Such a characteristic helps these frameworks to come to use for an enterprise. But, AngularJS still has its upper hand over its competitors.

The simple-to-learn design of the Angular Framework with various functions

A legacy system includes few characteristics like old technology that are not compatible with the present systems. These systems do not remain available for purchase from distributors or vendors. These legacy systems cannot update nor patch up by themselves as the developer or vendor stops its maintenance.

The CTO of a mobile and Web app development company Monsoon, Michi Kono agreed on the decisions. But he also commented that the core developers at AngularJS miscommunicated the information. As the AngularJS framework has its uses in Google, they can use the platform for legacy versions and supporting enterprises. According to Michi Kono, AngularJS can promise a safe approach for its use in enterprises. The framework of Angular Development Company USA makes learning simple as it lacks strong convention opinions. The framework is easy for developers to learn and Angular has its applications on other parallel technologies. Vast organizations that have a demand for on-scale development and hiring procedures can use the framework to their advantage.

The low level of Angular appears more as a toolbox than a framework. Such an approach makes Angular useful on a wide variety of utility functions. The developer can use the JavaScript framework to add a single website button through a separate framework. Major companies like Google, Facebook and Microsoft aim to improve JavaScript to match entrepreneur requirements. Since AtScript or the typed JavaScript from Google, will form the backbone of AngularJS 2.0, several developers shall prefer to leverage it.

The Best Fit

AngularJS has several promising aspects for developers from different enterprises to try. But the JavaScript framework undergoes several alterations by its developers. Yet, some of the JavaScript frameworks grab the focus of various users for which they remain in maintenance. Therefore, according to Brian Leroux, the Adobe Web developer, there are two options left. Developers can either imprison themselves within vast rewrites with no forward progress. Or Hire angular developers who can focus their attention to optimize the website architecture. Therefore, developers need to stay up-to-date with the current developments in the web application frameworks like AngularJS.

AngularJS frameworks carry lots of potential in real-time markets. But, the developers need to stay up-to-date to tackle the regular changes in its infrastructure.

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