David Loffer

David Loffer

1596686827

Laraish - A Laravel Wordpress Theme

Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It’s one of the most popular PHP frameworks today.

Laraish brings the Laravel Framework into WordPress, which allow us to have all the benefits of Laravel. So you can create themes with less effort, more enjoyment!

Requirement

The 99% of Laraish is just the regular full stack PHP Framework Laravel. So if you have never heard of it, you’re going to want to take a look at it before you can go any further.

For those who are already familiar with Laravel, it should be a piece of cake for you to get started with Laraish.

What Laraish is and is not

Laraish is not a framework for general purpose WordPress theme development.

Yes, it is a framework but not for general WordPress theme development. Laraish is aimed at helping create “homemade theme” rather than general purpose theme. So if you want to create themes with a bunch of theme options for sales or just for free distribution, you probably want to take a look at the following frameworks instead.

What’s the diffrence between the original Laravel?

I’d say almost no differences there, except some additional tweaking, which gets Laravel to work well inside a WordPress theme. So basically you could do anything that you could do with Laravel, it’s just the regular Laravel inside a WordPress theme. If you are curious about what exactly have been modified, taking a diff to the original Laravel would make sense for you.

Get Started

Installation

You can install Laraish by issuing the following command via Composer. composer create-project --prefer-dist laraish/laraish <theme-name>

Note that the MySQL server and the web server must be running before you can issue the **composer create-project** command to install Laraish. Because after Composer finishes the installation, it’s going to run an artisan command, which requires MySQL server and the web server that host the WordPress be running at the time you issuing the command.

Also, notice that if you are on Mac and use MAMP or similar application to create your local server environment you may need to change your $PATH environment variable to make Composer use the PHP binary that MAMP provides rather than the OS’s built-in PHP binary.

Routing

Laraish replaced the original UriValidator(Illuminate\Routing\Matching\UriValidator) with its own one to allow you to specify WordPress specific routes, like “archive” or “page” or “custom post type” ex.

To define a WordPress specific route, just by providing a “page type” as the first argument.

For example:

// The "about" page
Route::any('page.about', Controller@method);

// The child page "works" of "about".
Route::any('page.about.works', Controller@method);

// Any child page of "about".
Route::any('page.about.*', Controller@method);

// Any descendant page of "about".
Route::any('page.about.**', Controller@method);

// Grouping multiple routes that sharing a common `prefix`.
Route::group(['prefix' => 'page'], function () {

    Route::any('about.contact', function () {
        return 'Foo'; // equivalent to <page.about.contact>
    });

    Route::any('service.*.price', function () {
        return 'Bar'; // equivalent to <page.service.*.price>
    });

});

// IMPORTANT !
//
// Routes that has a higher specificity should be 
// placed more above(earlier) than the routes that have a lower specificity.
// Why? If you place the routes that have a lower specificity,
// the subsequent routes that have a higher specificity will be ignored.
//
// The following routes have a lower specificity than the above ones.
// So you want to place them here.

// Generic pages
Route::any('page', Controller@method);

// Front page
Route::any('front_page', Controller@method); 

// Post archive index page
Route::any('archive', Controller@method);

Here’s some notes you should keep in mind.

  • You can use a “dot notation” to specify the hierarchy for pages and taxonomies.
  • You can use the wild card to specify any child/descendant page/term of a parent/ancestor page/term.
  • You should care about the order of your routes. Routes that has a higher specificity should be placed more above than the routes that have a lower specificity.

What’s more, you can even write your own routes by URI, and it just works.

// This will use the original UriValidator of Laravel.
Route::get('/my/endpoint', function () {
    return 'Magic!';
});

Models

Laraish comes with some general purpose models like Post or Term model. Note that they are not an implementation of ORM like the Laravel’s Eloquent Model. They are just a simple wrapper for WordPress’s APIs that encapsulate some common logic to help you simplify your business logic.

You can find those models in Laraish\WpSupport\Model. Because the Post model is the most frequently used model, for convenience, a Post Class that extends the Laraish\WpSupport\Model\Post has brought to your app/Models directory already.

Let’s take a look at an example.

See you have a route like this :

Route::any('archive', 'Generic\Archive@index');

In your controller app\Http\Controllers\Generic\Archive :

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers\Generic;

use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use App\Models\Post;

class Archive extends Controller
{
    public function index()
    {
        $data = [
            'posts' => Post::queriedPosts() // get the posts for current page
        ];

        return $this->view('generic.archive', $data);
    }
}

In your view generic.archive :

<main class="posts">
    @foreach($posts as $post)
        <section class="post">
            <a class="post" href="{{ $post->permalink }}">
                <img class="post__thumbnail" src="{{ $post->thumbnail->url }}" alt="{{ $post->title }}">
            </a>
            <time class="post__time" datetime="{{ $post->dateTime }}">{{ $post->date }}</time>
            <a class="post__category" href="{{ $post->category->url }}">{{ $post->category->name }}</a>
            <h1 class="post__title">{{ $post->title }}</h1>
        </section>
    @endforeach

    {{  $posts->getPagination() }}
</main>

As you can see in the example above, you can get common properties of a post, like $post->permalink or $post->title etc.

Actually, those properties are not “real properties”. When you access property like $post->permalink, under the hood, it’ll call $post->permalink() to get the value for you automatically, and from the second time when you access the same property, it won’t call $post->permalink() again, instead, it’ll return the cached value from previous calling result. If you don’t want to use cached value, you can call the method explicitly like $post->title(). Also, feel free to create your own “properties” by adding public methods to your model class.

Take a look at Laraish\WpSupport\Model, there are some predefined “properties” that you may want to use.

The @loop blade directive

Laraish also added a @loop blade directive for simplifying “The Loop” in WordPress.

for example:

@loop($posts as $post)
	{{ get_the_title() }}
@endloop

will be compiled to

<?php foreach($posts as $post): setup_the_post( $post->wpPost ); ?>

    <?php echo e(get_the_title()); ?>

<?php endforeach; wp_reset_postdata(); ?>

where $post should be a Post model object.

Usually you don’t want to use the @loop directive. Because it’ll introduce some unnecessary overheads. Keep in mind that always prefer @foreach to @loop. Except you want to access some properties like content or excerpt which requiring must be retrieved within “The Loop”, otherwise never use the @loop actively.

Theme Options

Setup the custom post type, register the navigation menus … There always are some common tasks you have to deal with when you start to build a WordPress theme. The app/config/theme.php is where you define all your common tasks.

Some basic options are predefined for you. Take a look at the config/theme.php.

Also, you can create your own options by adding new static methods to the App\Providers\ThemeOptionsProvider. The name of the method will become to an option.

Actions and Filters

You define your actions and filters in App\Providers\EventServiceProvider just like the laravel’s event.

The following example adding a pre_get_posts action, and the handle method of App\Listeners\MainQueryListener will be called for this action.

<?php

namespace App\Providers;

use Laraish\Foundation\Support\Providers\EventServiceProvider as ServiceProvider;

class EventServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
    /**
     * Register the WordPress actions
     * @var array
     */
    protected $action = [
            'pre_get_posts' => 'App\Listeners\MainQueryListener'
    ];

    /**
     * Register the WordPress filters
     * @var array
     */
    protected $filter = [];
}

Pagination

You can get the pagination by calling the getPagination method of Post.

use App\Models\Post;

$posts = Post::queriedPosts();
<div>
	{{  $posts->getPagination() }}
</div>

By providing additional parameters, you can specify the view file and several options. See laraish/pagination for more details.

Work with ACF

The model classes comes with Laraish works seamlessly with ACF out of the box.

Get the value of custom field from model

For example, suppose that you have created a custom field with ACF named foobar. Then you can access the field’s value like this:

use App\Models\Post;

$post = new Post(123); 
// As with the `Post` model, these models works the same way. 
// `Laraish\WpSupport\Model\User`
// `Laraish\WpSupport\Model\Term` 

// This make it call the magic method to get the value of the custom field `foobar`. 
$foobar = $post->foobar;

Data Type Casting

You can determine if or not or how to cast the data type retrieved from ACF at config/theme.php.

The default behavior is casting any of these types to Laraish’s model:

  • WP_PostLaraish\WpSupport\Model\Post
  • WP_UserLaraish\WpSupport\Model\User
  • WP_TermLaraish\WpSupport\Model\Term

Additionally, casting any assoc array to stdClass.

The ShareViewData Middleware

Laraish comes with a middleware app/Http/Middleware/ShareViewData.php. This is your best place to define any shared view data or view composers.

Options page

Perhaps creating options pages is one of the most tedious tasks. If you’ve used the WordPress’s API to create options pages, you know how dirty the code is going to be…

Laraish provides a powerful and yet clean API to help you creating the options pages.

See laraish/options for more details.

View debugger

Sometimes, you just want to get some basic information about the current view(page) being displayed. For example, the path of the view file, or the name of the controller that was used.

To get the basic information of the current view being displayed, you include the ViewDebbuger trait in your App\Http\Controllers. Open your console of your browser, and you could find something like this:

{
    "view_path": "/var/www/example/wp-content/themes/example/resources/views/singular/news.blade.php",
    "compiled_path": "/var/www/example/wp-content/themes/example/storage/framework/views/befa3e2a2cb93be21c6ebf30a60824a5d2a2ed11.php",
    "data": {
        "post": {}
    },
    "controller": "App\\Http\\Controllers\\Singular\\News"
}

Note that when APP_ENV=production is set in your .env file, nothing will be outputted to the console.

Run artisan command

As I mentioned in the Installation section. To run an artisan command, you have to meet the following conditions.

  • The MySQL server and the web server must be running.
  • If you are on Mac and use MAMP or similar application to create your local server environment you may need to change your $PATH environment variable to make Composer use the PHP binary that MAMP provides rather than the OS’s built-in PHP binary.

Security Concerns

Notice that Laraish is just a regular WordPress theme. Therefore, not only the public directory but all the files and directories inside the theme are accessible from outside.

Laraish comes with two .htaccess files to deny any accesses against any files and directories inside the theme except the following files:

  • style.css
  • screenshot.png
  • public/**

If you don’t use Apache, you should have your server software configured to have the same access control just like the above one.

Known Issue

If you have a plugin using Composer, and that plugin has the same dependency as your theme(Laraish) has, may lead to a problem when they are using a different version of that dependency. In such a situation, it’ll require multiple Composer Autoloaders(vendor/autoload.php), and the last loaded one will take priority over the previous ones.

Say you have a plugin that depends on the package Foo (v1.2.0), and your theme depends on the same package Foo (v2.0.1); such a situation may lead to load the unintended version of Foo. Which version will be used depend on the time the autoloader.php was loaded and the time the package(class) was used.

Being that said, this is not a Composer specific issue. I’d say it’s a WordPress issue that needs to be solved somehow.

#laravel #php #laraish #wordpress #developer

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Laraish - A Laravel Wordpress Theme
Seamus  Quitzon

Seamus Quitzon

1595201363

Php how to delete multiple rows through checkbox using ajax in laravel

First thing, we will need a table and i am creating products table for this example. So run the following query to create table.

CREATE TABLE `products` (
 `id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `name` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
 `description` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8mb4_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
 `created_at` timestamp NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
 `updated_at` datetime DEFAULT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=7 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8mb4 COLLATE=utf8mb4_unicode_ci

Next, we will need to insert some dummy records in this table that will be deleted.

INSERT INTO `products` (`name`, `description`) VALUES

('Test product 1', 'Product description example1'),

('Test product 2', 'Product description example2'),

('Test product 3', 'Product description example3'),

('Test product 4', 'Product description example4'),

('Test product 5', 'Product description example5');

Now we are redy to create a model corresponding to this products table. Here we will create Product model. So let’s create a model file Product.php file under app directory and put the code below.

<?php

namespace App;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class Product extends Model
{
    protected $fillable = [
        'name','description'
    ];
}

Step 2: Create Route

Now, in this second step we will create some routes to handle the request for this example. So opeen routes/web.php file and copy the routes as given below.

routes/web.php

Route::get('product', 'ProductController@index');
Route::delete('product/{id}', ['as'=>'product.destroy','uses'=>'ProductController@destroy']);
Route::delete('delete-multiple-product', ['as'=>'product.multiple-delete','uses'=>'ProductController@deleteMultiple']);

#laravel #delete multiple rows in laravel using ajax #laravel ajax delete #laravel ajax multiple checkbox delete #laravel delete multiple rows #laravel delete records using ajax #laravel multiple checkbox delete rows #laravel multiple delete

David Loffer

David Loffer

1596686827

Laraish - A Laravel Wordpress Theme

Laravel is a web application framework with expressive, elegant syntax. It’s one of the most popular PHP frameworks today.

Laraish brings the Laravel Framework into WordPress, which allow us to have all the benefits of Laravel. So you can create themes with less effort, more enjoyment!

Requirement

The 99% of Laraish is just the regular full stack PHP Framework Laravel. So if you have never heard of it, you’re going to want to take a look at it before you can go any further.

For those who are already familiar with Laravel, it should be a piece of cake for you to get started with Laraish.

What Laraish is and is not

Laraish is not a framework for general purpose WordPress theme development.

Yes, it is a framework but not for general WordPress theme development. Laraish is aimed at helping create “homemade theme” rather than general purpose theme. So if you want to create themes with a bunch of theme options for sales or just for free distribution, you probably want to take a look at the following frameworks instead.

What’s the diffrence between the original Laravel?

I’d say almost no differences there, except some additional tweaking, which gets Laravel to work well inside a WordPress theme. So basically you could do anything that you could do with Laravel, it’s just the regular Laravel inside a WordPress theme. If you are curious about what exactly have been modified, taking a diff to the original Laravel would make sense for you.

Get Started

Installation

You can install Laraish by issuing the following command via Composer. composer create-project --prefer-dist laraish/laraish <theme-name>

Note that the MySQL server and the web server must be running before you can issue the **composer create-project** command to install Laraish. Because after Composer finishes the installation, it’s going to run an artisan command, which requires MySQL server and the web server that host the WordPress be running at the time you issuing the command.

Also, notice that if you are on Mac and use MAMP or similar application to create your local server environment you may need to change your $PATH environment variable to make Composer use the PHP binary that MAMP provides rather than the OS’s built-in PHP binary.

Routing

Laraish replaced the original UriValidator(Illuminate\Routing\Matching\UriValidator) with its own one to allow you to specify WordPress specific routes, like “archive” or “page” or “custom post type” ex.

To define a WordPress specific route, just by providing a “page type” as the first argument.

For example:

// The "about" page
Route::any('page.about', Controller@method);

// The child page "works" of "about".
Route::any('page.about.works', Controller@method);

// Any child page of "about".
Route::any('page.about.*', Controller@method);

// Any descendant page of "about".
Route::any('page.about.**', Controller@method);

// Grouping multiple routes that sharing a common `prefix`.
Route::group(['prefix' => 'page'], function () {

    Route::any('about.contact', function () {
        return 'Foo'; // equivalent to <page.about.contact>
    });

    Route::any('service.*.price', function () {
        return 'Bar'; // equivalent to <page.service.*.price>
    });

});

// IMPORTANT !
//
// Routes that has a higher specificity should be 
// placed more above(earlier) than the routes that have a lower specificity.
// Why? If you place the routes that have a lower specificity,
// the subsequent routes that have a higher specificity will be ignored.
//
// The following routes have a lower specificity than the above ones.
// So you want to place them here.

// Generic pages
Route::any('page', Controller@method);

// Front page
Route::any('front_page', Controller@method); 

// Post archive index page
Route::any('archive', Controller@method);

Here’s some notes you should keep in mind.

  • You can use a “dot notation” to specify the hierarchy for pages and taxonomies.
  • You can use the wild card to specify any child/descendant page/term of a parent/ancestor page/term.
  • You should care about the order of your routes. Routes that has a higher specificity should be placed more above than the routes that have a lower specificity.

What’s more, you can even write your own routes by URI, and it just works.

// This will use the original UriValidator of Laravel.
Route::get('/my/endpoint', function () {
    return 'Magic!';
});

Models

Laraish comes with some general purpose models like Post or Term model. Note that they are not an implementation of ORM like the Laravel’s Eloquent Model. They are just a simple wrapper for WordPress’s APIs that encapsulate some common logic to help you simplify your business logic.

You can find those models in Laraish\WpSupport\Model. Because the Post model is the most frequently used model, for convenience, a Post Class that extends the Laraish\WpSupport\Model\Post has brought to your app/Models directory already.

Let’s take a look at an example.

See you have a route like this :

Route::any('archive', 'Generic\Archive@index');

In your controller app\Http\Controllers\Generic\Archive :

<?php

namespace App\Http\Controllers\Generic;

use App\Http\Controllers\Controller;
use App\Models\Post;

class Archive extends Controller
{
    public function index()
    {
        $data = [
            'posts' => Post::queriedPosts() // get the posts for current page
        ];

        return $this->view('generic.archive', $data);
    }
}

In your view generic.archive :

<main class="posts">
    @foreach($posts as $post)
        <section class="post">
            <a class="post" href="{{ $post->permalink }}">
                <img class="post__thumbnail" src="{{ $post->thumbnail->url }}" alt="{{ $post->title }}">
            </a>
            <time class="post__time" datetime="{{ $post->dateTime }}">{{ $post->date }}</time>
            <a class="post__category" href="{{ $post->category->url }}">{{ $post->category->name }}</a>
            <h1 class="post__title">{{ $post->title }}</h1>
        </section>
    @endforeach

    {{  $posts->getPagination() }}
</main>

As you can see in the example above, you can get common properties of a post, like $post->permalink or $post->title etc.

Actually, those properties are not “real properties”. When you access property like $post->permalink, under the hood, it’ll call $post->permalink() to get the value for you automatically, and from the second time when you access the same property, it won’t call $post->permalink() again, instead, it’ll return the cached value from previous calling result. If you don’t want to use cached value, you can call the method explicitly like $post->title(). Also, feel free to create your own “properties” by adding public methods to your model class.

Take a look at Laraish\WpSupport\Model, there are some predefined “properties” that you may want to use.

The @loop blade directive

Laraish also added a @loop blade directive for simplifying “The Loop” in WordPress.

for example:

@loop($posts as $post)
	{{ get_the_title() }}
@endloop

will be compiled to

<?php foreach($posts as $post): setup_the_post( $post->wpPost ); ?>

    <?php echo e(get_the_title()); ?>

<?php endforeach; wp_reset_postdata(); ?>

where $post should be a Post model object.

Usually you don’t want to use the @loop directive. Because it’ll introduce some unnecessary overheads. Keep in mind that always prefer @foreach to @loop. Except you want to access some properties like content or excerpt which requiring must be retrieved within “The Loop”, otherwise never use the @loop actively.

Theme Options

Setup the custom post type, register the navigation menus … There always are some common tasks you have to deal with when you start to build a WordPress theme. The app/config/theme.php is where you define all your common tasks.

Some basic options are predefined for you. Take a look at the config/theme.php.

Also, you can create your own options by adding new static methods to the App\Providers\ThemeOptionsProvider. The name of the method will become to an option.

Actions and Filters

You define your actions and filters in App\Providers\EventServiceProvider just like the laravel’s event.

The following example adding a pre_get_posts action, and the handle method of App\Listeners\MainQueryListener will be called for this action.

<?php

namespace App\Providers;

use Laraish\Foundation\Support\Providers\EventServiceProvider as ServiceProvider;

class EventServiceProvider extends ServiceProvider
{
    /**
     * Register the WordPress actions
     * @var array
     */
    protected $action = [
            'pre_get_posts' => 'App\Listeners\MainQueryListener'
    ];

    /**
     * Register the WordPress filters
     * @var array
     */
    protected $filter = [];
}

Pagination

You can get the pagination by calling the getPagination method of Post.

use App\Models\Post;

$posts = Post::queriedPosts();
<div>
	{{  $posts->getPagination() }}
</div>

By providing additional parameters, you can specify the view file and several options. See laraish/pagination for more details.

Work with ACF

The model classes comes with Laraish works seamlessly with ACF out of the box.

Get the value of custom field from model

For example, suppose that you have created a custom field with ACF named foobar. Then you can access the field’s value like this:

use App\Models\Post;

$post = new Post(123); 
// As with the `Post` model, these models works the same way. 
// `Laraish\WpSupport\Model\User`
// `Laraish\WpSupport\Model\Term` 

// This make it call the magic method to get the value of the custom field `foobar`. 
$foobar = $post->foobar;

Data Type Casting

You can determine if or not or how to cast the data type retrieved from ACF at config/theme.php.

The default behavior is casting any of these types to Laraish’s model:

  • WP_PostLaraish\WpSupport\Model\Post
  • WP_UserLaraish\WpSupport\Model\User
  • WP_TermLaraish\WpSupport\Model\Term

Additionally, casting any assoc array to stdClass.

The ShareViewData Middleware

Laraish comes with a middleware app/Http/Middleware/ShareViewData.php. This is your best place to define any shared view data or view composers.

Options page

Perhaps creating options pages is one of the most tedious tasks. If you’ve used the WordPress’s API to create options pages, you know how dirty the code is going to be…

Laraish provides a powerful and yet clean API to help you creating the options pages.

See laraish/options for more details.

View debugger

Sometimes, you just want to get some basic information about the current view(page) being displayed. For example, the path of the view file, or the name of the controller that was used.

To get the basic information of the current view being displayed, you include the ViewDebbuger trait in your App\Http\Controllers. Open your console of your browser, and you could find something like this:

{
    "view_path": "/var/www/example/wp-content/themes/example/resources/views/singular/news.blade.php",
    "compiled_path": "/var/www/example/wp-content/themes/example/storage/framework/views/befa3e2a2cb93be21c6ebf30a60824a5d2a2ed11.php",
    "data": {
        "post": {}
    },
    "controller": "App\\Http\\Controllers\\Singular\\News"
}

Note that when APP_ENV=production is set in your .env file, nothing will be outputted to the console.

Run artisan command

As I mentioned in the Installation section. To run an artisan command, you have to meet the following conditions.

  • The MySQL server and the web server must be running.
  • If you are on Mac and use MAMP or similar application to create your local server environment you may need to change your $PATH environment variable to make Composer use the PHP binary that MAMP provides rather than the OS’s built-in PHP binary.

Security Concerns

Notice that Laraish is just a regular WordPress theme. Therefore, not only the public directory but all the files and directories inside the theme are accessible from outside.

Laraish comes with two .htaccess files to deny any accesses against any files and directories inside the theme except the following files:

  • style.css
  • screenshot.png
  • public/**

If you don’t use Apache, you should have your server software configured to have the same access control just like the above one.

Known Issue

If you have a plugin using Composer, and that plugin has the same dependency as your theme(Laraish) has, may lead to a problem when they are using a different version of that dependency. In such a situation, it’ll require multiple Composer Autoloaders(vendor/autoload.php), and the last loaded one will take priority over the previous ones.

Say you have a plugin that depends on the package Foo (v1.2.0), and your theme depends on the same package Foo (v2.0.1); such a situation may lead to load the unintended version of Foo. Which version will be used depend on the time the autoloader.php was loaded and the time the package(class) was used.

Being that said, this is not a Composer specific issue. I’d say it’s a WordPress issue that needs to be solved somehow.

#laravel #php #laraish #wordpress #developer

Juned Ghanchi

1621916889

Wordpress Development India, Hire Wordpress Developers

Hire WordPress developers from IndianAppDevelopers on an hourly or full-time basis to build advanced custom WordPress applications. Our WordPress developers have 5+ years of experience building websites, themes and plugins for small- and large-scale businesses.

You can hire highly knowledgeable WordPress developers in India from us to maintain and deliver the highest quality standards on-time solutions.

Looking to outsource a WordPress development project? Or want to hire WordPress developers? Then, get in touch with us.

#wordpress development india #hire wordpress developers india #wordpress development #wordpress developers #wordpress programmers #hire wordpress programmers

Juned Ghanchi

1621508419

Laravel App Development Company in India, Hire Laravel Developers

Hire our expert team of Laravel app developers for flexible PHP applications across various cloud service providers.

With this easy build technology, we develop feature-rich apps that make your complex business process a lot easier. Our apps are,

  • More secure and scalable.
  • A good framework lets you manage and organize resources better.
  • And have a rich community base.

Get your business a best in classlaravel app. Hire laravel app developers in India. We have the best organizational set-up to provide you the most advanced app development services.

#laravel app development company india #hire laravel developers india #laravel app development company #hire laravel developers #laravel development agency #laravel app programmers

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website