Oral  Brekke

Oral Brekke

1655003880

Rust: Empowering Everyone to Build Reliable and Efficient Software

The Rust Programming Language

This is the main source code repository for Rust. It contains the compiler, standard library, and documentation.

Installing from Source

The Rust build system uses a Python script called x.py to build the compiler, which manages the bootstrapping process. It lives in the root of the project.

The x.py command can be run directly on most systems in the following format:

./x.py <subcommand> [flags]

This is how the documentation and examples assume you are running x.py.

Systems such as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS do not create the necessary python command by default when Python is installed that allows x.py to be run directly. In that case you can either create a symlink for python (Ubuntu provides the python-is-python3 package for this), or run x.py using Python itself:

# Python 3
python3 x.py <subcommand> [flags]

# Python 2.7
python2.7 x.py <subcommand> [flags]

More information about x.py can be found by running it with the --help flag or reading the rustc dev guide.

Building on a Unix-like system

Make sure you have installed the dependencies:

  • g++ 5.1 or later or clang++ 3.5 or later
  • python 3 or 2.7
  • GNU make 3.81 or later
  • cmake 3.13.4 or later
  • ninja
  • curl
  • git
  • ssl which comes in libssl-dev or openssl-devel
  • pkg-config if you are compiling on Linux and targeting Linux

Clone the source with git:

git clone https://github.com/rust-lang/rust.git
cd rust

Configure the build settings:

The Rust build system uses a file named config.toml in the root of the source tree to determine various configuration settings for the build. Copy the default config.toml.example to config.toml to get started.

cp config.toml.example config.toml

If you plan to use x.py install to create an installation, it is recommended that you set the prefix value in the [install] section to a directory.

Create install directory if you are not installing in default directory

Build and install:

./x.py build && ./x.py install

When complete, ./x.py install will place several programs into $PREFIX/bin: rustc, the Rust compiler, and rustdoc, the API-documentation tool. This install does not include Cargo, Rust's package manager. To build and install Cargo, you may run ./x.py install cargo or set the build.extended key in config.toml to true to build and install all tools.

Building on Windows

There are two prominent ABIs in use on Windows: the native (MSVC) ABI used by Visual Studio, and the GNU ABI used by the GCC toolchain. Which version of Rust you need depends largely on what C/C++ libraries you want to interoperate with: for interop with software produced by Visual Studio use the MSVC build of Rust; for interop with GNU software built using the MinGW/MSYS2 toolchain use the GNU build.

MinGW

MSYS2 can be used to easily build Rust on Windows:

Grab the latest MSYS2 installer and go through the installer.

Run mingw32_shell.bat or mingw64_shell.bat from wherever you installed MSYS2 (i.e. C:\msys64), depending on whether you want 32-bit or 64-bit Rust. (As of the latest version of MSYS2 you have to run msys2_shell.cmd -mingw32 or msys2_shell.cmd -mingw64 from the command line instead)

From this terminal, install the required tools:

# Update package mirrors (may be needed if you have a fresh install of MSYS2)
pacman -Sy pacman-mirrors

# Install build tools needed for Rust. If you're building a 32-bit compiler,
# then replace "x86_64" below with "i686". If you've already got git, python,
# or CMake installed and in PATH you can remove them from this list. Note
# that it is important that you do **not** use the 'python2', 'cmake' and 'ninja'
# packages from the 'msys2' subsystem. The build has historically been known
# to fail with these packages.
pacman -S git \
            make \
            diffutils \
            tar \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-python \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-cmake \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-gcc \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-ninja

Navigate to Rust's source code (or clone it), then build it:

./x.py build && ./x.py install

MSVC

MSVC builds of Rust additionally require an installation of Visual Studio 2017 (or later) so rustc can use its linker. The simplest way is to get the Visual Studio, check the “C++ build tools” and “Windows 10 SDK” workload.

(If you're installing cmake yourself, be careful that “C++ CMake tools for Windows” doesn't get included under “Individual components”.)

With these dependencies installed, you can build the compiler in a cmd.exe shell with:

python x.py build

Currently, building Rust only works with some known versions of Visual Studio. If you have a more recent version installed and the build system doesn't understand, you may need to force rustbuild to use an older version. This can be done by manually calling the appropriate vcvars file before running the bootstrap.

CALL "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2019\Community\VC\Auxiliary\Build\vcvars64.bat"
python x.py build

Specifying an ABI

Each specific ABI can also be used from either environment (for example, using the GNU ABI in PowerShell) by using an explicit build triple. The available Windows build triples are:

  • GNU ABI (using GCC)
    • i686-pc-windows-gnu
    • x86_64-pc-windows-gnu
  • The MSVC ABI
    • i686-pc-windows-msvc
    • x86_64-pc-windows-msvc

The build triple can be specified by either specifying --build=<triple> when invoking x.py commands, or by copying the config.toml file (as described in Installing From Source), and modifying the build option under the [build] section.

Configure and Make

While it's not the recommended build system, this project also provides a configure script and makefile (the latter of which just invokes x.py).

./configure
make && sudo make install

When using the configure script, the generated config.mk file may override the config.toml file. To go back to the config.toml file, delete the generated config.mk file.

Building Documentation

If you’d like to build the documentation, it’s almost the same:

./x.py doc

The generated documentation will appear under doc in the build directory for the ABI used. I.e., if the ABI was x86_64-pc-windows-msvc, the directory will be build\x86_64-pc-windows-msvc\doc.

Notes

Since the Rust compiler is written in Rust, it must be built by a precompiled "snapshot" version of itself (made in an earlier stage of development). As such, source builds require a connection to the Internet, to fetch snapshots, and an OS that can execute the available snapshot binaries.

Snapshot binaries are currently built and tested on several platforms:

Platform / Architecturex86x86_64
Windows (7, 8, 10, ...)
Linux (kernel 2.6.32, glibc 2.11 or later)
macOS (10.7 Lion or later)(*)

(*): Apple dropped support for running 32-bit binaries starting from macOS 10.15 and iOS 11. Due to this decision from Apple, the targets are no longer useful to our users. Please read our blog post for more info.

You may find that other platforms work, but these are our officially supported build environments that are most likely to work.

Quick Start

Read "Installation" from The Book.

Getting Help

The Rust community congregates in a few places:

Contributing

If you are interested in contributing to the Rust project, please take a look at the Getting Started guide in the rustc-dev-guide.

Trademark

The Rust Foundation owns and protects the Rust and Cargo trademarks and logos (the “Rust Trademarks”).

If you want to use these names or brands, please read the media guide.

Third-party logos may be subject to third-party copyrights and trademarks. See Licenses for details.

Note: this README is for users rather than contributors. If you wish to contribute to the compiler, you should read the Getting Started section of the rustc-dev-guide instead. You can ask for help in the #new members Zulip stream.

Author: Rust-lang
Source Code: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust 
License: Apache-2.0, MIT licenses found

#node #nodejs #rust 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Rust: Empowering Everyone to Build Reliable and Efficient Software

Serde Rust: Serialization Framework for Rust

Serde

*Serde is a framework for serializing and deserializing Rust data structures efficiently and generically.*

You may be looking for:

Serde in action

Click to show Cargo.toml. Run this code in the playground.

[dependencies]

# The core APIs, including the Serialize and Deserialize traits. Always
# required when using Serde. The "derive" feature is only required when
# using #[derive(Serialize, Deserialize)] to make Serde work with structs
# and enums defined in your crate.
serde = { version = "1.0", features = ["derive"] }

# Each data format lives in its own crate; the sample code below uses JSON
# but you may be using a different one.
serde_json = "1.0"

 

use serde::{Serialize, Deserialize};

#[derive(Serialize, Deserialize, Debug)]
struct Point {
    x: i32,
    y: i32,
}

fn main() {
    let point = Point { x: 1, y: 2 };

    // Convert the Point to a JSON string.
    let serialized = serde_json::to_string(&point).unwrap();

    // Prints serialized = {"x":1,"y":2}
    println!("serialized = {}", serialized);

    // Convert the JSON string back to a Point.
    let deserialized: Point = serde_json::from_str(&serialized).unwrap();

    // Prints deserialized = Point { x: 1, y: 2 }
    println!("deserialized = {:?}", deserialized);
}

Getting help

Serde is one of the most widely used Rust libraries so any place that Rustaceans congregate will be able to help you out. For chat, consider trying the #rust-questions or #rust-beginners channels of the unofficial community Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang-community), the #rust-usage or #beginners channels of the official Rust Project Discord (invite: https://discord.gg/rust-lang), or the #general stream in Zulip. For asynchronous, consider the [rust] tag on StackOverflow, the /r/rust subreddit which has a pinned weekly easy questions post, or the Rust Discourse forum. It's acceptable to file a support issue in this repo but they tend not to get as many eyes as any of the above and may get closed without a response after some time.

Download Details:
Author: serde-rs
Source Code: https://github.com/serde-rs/serde
License: View license

#rust  #rustlang 

Custom Software vs Off-the-shelf Software: How to select a better one for your business?

Custom Software or Off-the-shelf software, the question in mind for many business personnel. Read this blog to get help to make the right decision that will benefit your business.
For a business that wants to upgrade and modernize itself with the help of software, a common dilemma it is whether to go for custom-made software or opt for off-the-shelf software. You can find many top software development companies worldwide, but before that all, you should first decide the type of software –an off-the-shelf software or a custom one.
This blog aims to overcome the dilemma and accord some clarity to a business looking to automate its business processes.

#custom software vs off-the-shelf software #custom software development companies #top software development companies #off-the-shelf software development #customized software solution #custom software development

Oral  Brekke

Oral Brekke

1655003880

Rust: Empowering Everyone to Build Reliable and Efficient Software

The Rust Programming Language

This is the main source code repository for Rust. It contains the compiler, standard library, and documentation.

Installing from Source

The Rust build system uses a Python script called x.py to build the compiler, which manages the bootstrapping process. It lives in the root of the project.

The x.py command can be run directly on most systems in the following format:

./x.py <subcommand> [flags]

This is how the documentation and examples assume you are running x.py.

Systems such as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS do not create the necessary python command by default when Python is installed that allows x.py to be run directly. In that case you can either create a symlink for python (Ubuntu provides the python-is-python3 package for this), or run x.py using Python itself:

# Python 3
python3 x.py <subcommand> [flags]

# Python 2.7
python2.7 x.py <subcommand> [flags]

More information about x.py can be found by running it with the --help flag or reading the rustc dev guide.

Building on a Unix-like system

Make sure you have installed the dependencies:

  • g++ 5.1 or later or clang++ 3.5 or later
  • python 3 or 2.7
  • GNU make 3.81 or later
  • cmake 3.13.4 or later
  • ninja
  • curl
  • git
  • ssl which comes in libssl-dev or openssl-devel
  • pkg-config if you are compiling on Linux and targeting Linux

Clone the source with git:

git clone https://github.com/rust-lang/rust.git
cd rust

Configure the build settings:

The Rust build system uses a file named config.toml in the root of the source tree to determine various configuration settings for the build. Copy the default config.toml.example to config.toml to get started.

cp config.toml.example config.toml

If you plan to use x.py install to create an installation, it is recommended that you set the prefix value in the [install] section to a directory.

Create install directory if you are not installing in default directory

Build and install:

./x.py build && ./x.py install

When complete, ./x.py install will place several programs into $PREFIX/bin: rustc, the Rust compiler, and rustdoc, the API-documentation tool. This install does not include Cargo, Rust's package manager. To build and install Cargo, you may run ./x.py install cargo or set the build.extended key in config.toml to true to build and install all tools.

Building on Windows

There are two prominent ABIs in use on Windows: the native (MSVC) ABI used by Visual Studio, and the GNU ABI used by the GCC toolchain. Which version of Rust you need depends largely on what C/C++ libraries you want to interoperate with: for interop with software produced by Visual Studio use the MSVC build of Rust; for interop with GNU software built using the MinGW/MSYS2 toolchain use the GNU build.

MinGW

MSYS2 can be used to easily build Rust on Windows:

Grab the latest MSYS2 installer and go through the installer.

Run mingw32_shell.bat or mingw64_shell.bat from wherever you installed MSYS2 (i.e. C:\msys64), depending on whether you want 32-bit or 64-bit Rust. (As of the latest version of MSYS2 you have to run msys2_shell.cmd -mingw32 or msys2_shell.cmd -mingw64 from the command line instead)

From this terminal, install the required tools:

# Update package mirrors (may be needed if you have a fresh install of MSYS2)
pacman -Sy pacman-mirrors

# Install build tools needed for Rust. If you're building a 32-bit compiler,
# then replace "x86_64" below with "i686". If you've already got git, python,
# or CMake installed and in PATH you can remove them from this list. Note
# that it is important that you do **not** use the 'python2', 'cmake' and 'ninja'
# packages from the 'msys2' subsystem. The build has historically been known
# to fail with these packages.
pacman -S git \
            make \
            diffutils \
            tar \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-python \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-cmake \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-gcc \
            mingw-w64-x86_64-ninja

Navigate to Rust's source code (or clone it), then build it:

./x.py build && ./x.py install

MSVC

MSVC builds of Rust additionally require an installation of Visual Studio 2017 (or later) so rustc can use its linker. The simplest way is to get the Visual Studio, check the “C++ build tools” and “Windows 10 SDK” workload.

(If you're installing cmake yourself, be careful that “C++ CMake tools for Windows” doesn't get included under “Individual components”.)

With these dependencies installed, you can build the compiler in a cmd.exe shell with:

python x.py build

Currently, building Rust only works with some known versions of Visual Studio. If you have a more recent version installed and the build system doesn't understand, you may need to force rustbuild to use an older version. This can be done by manually calling the appropriate vcvars file before running the bootstrap.

CALL "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2019\Community\VC\Auxiliary\Build\vcvars64.bat"
python x.py build

Specifying an ABI

Each specific ABI can also be used from either environment (for example, using the GNU ABI in PowerShell) by using an explicit build triple. The available Windows build triples are:

  • GNU ABI (using GCC)
    • i686-pc-windows-gnu
    • x86_64-pc-windows-gnu
  • The MSVC ABI
    • i686-pc-windows-msvc
    • x86_64-pc-windows-msvc

The build triple can be specified by either specifying --build=<triple> when invoking x.py commands, or by copying the config.toml file (as described in Installing From Source), and modifying the build option under the [build] section.

Configure and Make

While it's not the recommended build system, this project also provides a configure script and makefile (the latter of which just invokes x.py).

./configure
make && sudo make install

When using the configure script, the generated config.mk file may override the config.toml file. To go back to the config.toml file, delete the generated config.mk file.

Building Documentation

If you’d like to build the documentation, it’s almost the same:

./x.py doc

The generated documentation will appear under doc in the build directory for the ABI used. I.e., if the ABI was x86_64-pc-windows-msvc, the directory will be build\x86_64-pc-windows-msvc\doc.

Notes

Since the Rust compiler is written in Rust, it must be built by a precompiled "snapshot" version of itself (made in an earlier stage of development). As such, source builds require a connection to the Internet, to fetch snapshots, and an OS that can execute the available snapshot binaries.

Snapshot binaries are currently built and tested on several platforms:

Platform / Architecturex86x86_64
Windows (7, 8, 10, ...)
Linux (kernel 2.6.32, glibc 2.11 or later)
macOS (10.7 Lion or later)(*)

(*): Apple dropped support for running 32-bit binaries starting from macOS 10.15 and iOS 11. Due to this decision from Apple, the targets are no longer useful to our users. Please read our blog post for more info.

You may find that other platforms work, but these are our officially supported build environments that are most likely to work.

Quick Start

Read "Installation" from The Book.

Getting Help

The Rust community congregates in a few places:

Contributing

If you are interested in contributing to the Rust project, please take a look at the Getting Started guide in the rustc-dev-guide.

Trademark

The Rust Foundation owns and protects the Rust and Cargo trademarks and logos (the “Rust Trademarks”).

If you want to use these names or brands, please read the media guide.

Third-party logos may be subject to third-party copyrights and trademarks. See Licenses for details.

Note: this README is for users rather than contributors. If you wish to contribute to the compiler, you should read the Getting Started section of the rustc-dev-guide instead. You can ask for help in the #new members Zulip stream.

Author: Rust-lang
Source Code: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust 
License: Apache-2.0, MIT licenses found

#node #nodejs #rust 

Christa  Stehr

Christa Stehr

1594456938

Offshore Software Development - Best Practices

With the rise of globalization and the worldwide lockdown due to the pandemic, most of the work has been done by remote working processes and professionals from their homes. This lockdown has proved the efficiency of remote development and enhanced the trust in offshore software development industry.

To make the most out of the benefits of offshore software development, you should understand the crucial factors that affect offshore development. This is why you should read this guide for the best practices when hiring an offshore software development company. Despite the size and the industry of the business, offshore software development is not beneficial for every entrepreneur in many aspects to make the optimum use of talents in technology across the globe.

Here are some of the top reasons why offshore development is beneficial for your business.

  • Offshore development teams can work on flexible timing to provide you with the best possible software development practices.
  • Get access to the talents across the world from your home to develop the top of the line software with the help of offshore development companies.
  • Assured high quality and next-generation technology expertise with duly NDA signed with respect to the priorities of the business.
  • With flexible recruitment models, you can hire the freelance developers, remote development team, or an entire offshore development company with respect to the size of your business.
  • Build high-end software applications from one corner of the world by hiring software developers across the world.
  • Get immediate access to the best resources without hiring them on a permanent basis.

To avail of all these benefits, you should have clear goals, a list of requirements, and features that are mandatory for your software product.

Here are a few tips to help you find the best offshore software development company. Build a top-notch software application by following the listed best practices.

#web development #how to start offshore software development company #offshore meaning #offshore software development best practices #offshore software development company #offshore software development company in india #offshore software development cost #offshore software development statistics #outsource software development

Origin Scale

Origin Scale

1615535784

Purchasing & Replacement Software Solutions | Originscale

With Originscale, you’ve got reliable software providing dynamic inventory insights at your fingertips including raw materials and finished products that help you prevent missed production timelines, sales, avoid stockouts, and free up cash by optimizing operations so you can reinvest in your business.
Read more: https://www.originscale.io/purchasingreplenishment

#purchasing software solutions #purchase order software #purchasing software #free purchasing software #purchase order management software #purchasing software for manufacturing