Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1657942860

A Beautiful, Fast & Fully Open Source Mail Client for Mac, Windows

💌 Mailspring

Mailspring is a new version of Nylas Mail maintained by one of the original authors. It's faster, leaner, and shipping today! It replaces the JavaScript sync code in Nylas Mail with a new C++ sync engine based on Mailcore2. It uses roughly half the RAM and CPU of Nylas Mail and idles with almost zero "CPU Wakes", which translates to great battery life. It also has an entirely revamped composer and other great new features.

Mailspring's UI is open source (GPLv3) and written in TypeScript with Electron and React - it's built on a plugin architecture and was designed to be easy to extend. Check out CONTRIBUTING.md to get started!

Mailspring's sync engine is spawned by the Electron application and runs locally on your computer. It is open source (GPLv3) and written in C++ and C. For convenience, however, when you set up your development environment, Mailspring uses the latest version of the sync engine we've shipped for your platform so you don't need to pull sources or install its compile-time dependencies.

Mailspring Screenshot

Features

Mailspring comes packed with powerful features like Unified Inbox, Snooze, Send Later, Mail Rules, Templates and more. Mailspring Pro, which you can unlock with a monthly subscription, adds even more features for people who send a ton of email: link tracking, read receipts, mailbox analytics, contact and company profiles. All of these features run in the client - Mailspring does not send your email credentials to the cloud. For a full list of features, check out getmailspring.com.

Download Mailspring

You can download compiled versions of Mailspring for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux (deb, rpm and snap) from https://getmailspring.com/download.

Getting Help

You can find community-based help and discussion with other Mailspring users on our Discourse community.

Contributing

Mailspring is entirely open-source. Pull requests and contributions are welcome! There are three ways to contribute: building a plugin, building a theme, and submitting pull requests to the project itself. When you're getting started, you may want to join our Discourse so you can ask questions and learn from other people doing development.

Contributor Covenant

Running Mailspring from Source

To install all dependencies and run Mailspring from its source code, run the following commands from the root directory of the Mailspring repository:

export npm_config_arch=x64 # If you are on an M1 / Apple Silicon Mac
npm install
npm start

You can attach command line parameters by separating them using a double hyphen:

npm start -- --help

Building Mailspring

To build Mailspring, you need to run the following command from the root directory of the Mailspring repository:

npm run-script build

Building A Plugin

Plugins lie at the heart of Mailspring and give it its powerful features. Building your own plugins allows you to integrate the app with other tools, experiment with new workflows, and more. Follow the Getting Started guide to write your first plugin in five minutes.

To create your own theme, check out the Mailspring-Theme-Starter.

To create your own plugin, check out the Mailspring-Plugin-Starter.

A plugin "store" like the Chrome Web Store is coming soon, and will make it easy for other users to discover plugins you create. (Right now, users need to "sideload" the plugins into the app by downloading them and copying them into place.)

You can share and browse Mailspring Plugins, and discuss plugin development with other developers, on our Discourse.

Building a Theme

The Mailspring user interface is styled using CSS, which means it's easy to modify and extend. Mailspring comes stock with a few beautiful themes, and there are many more which have been built by community developers. To start creating a theme, clone the theme starter!

If you are updating an existing Nylas theme for Mailspring here is a step by step tutorial. Notice: as part of the update process you will probably need to import mailspring base variables.

You can share and browse Mailspring Themes, and discuss theme development with other developers, on our Discourse.

Localizing / Translating

Mailspring (1.5.0 and above) supports localization. If you're a fluent speaker of another language, we'd love your help improving translations. Check out the LOCALIZATION guide for more information. You can discuss localization and translation with other developers on our Discourse.

Contributing to Mailspring Core

Pull requests are always welcome - check out CONTRIBUTING for more information about setting up the development environment, running tests locally, and submitting pull requests.

Author: Foundry376
Source Code: https://github.com/Foundry376/Mailspring 
License: GPL-3.0 license

#electron #windows #linux #email 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

A Beautiful, Fast & Fully Open Source Mail Client for Mac, Windows

How to Install OBS on Linux, Windows and MacOS

OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) is a free and open-source video recording and livestreaming software program that is written in C, C ++, and Qt and developed by the OBS project and a community of independent developers. It is mainly used for streaming and recording videos. It supports a wide range of plugins to extend the functionality of the program.

The transport of the OBS video is primarily accomplished using the RTMP (or Real Time Messaging Protocol) and as such, can be sent to any destination which supports RTMP, including many streaming websites like YouTube, Twitch, Instagram and Facebook.

OBS Studio is capable of using the x264 free software library, Intel Quick Sync Video, Nvidia NVENC and the AMD Video Coding Engine to encode video streams into the H.264/MPEG-4 formats, and the H.265/HEVC format. Multiple audio tracks can be encoded using any codecs and available in libavcodec/libavformat, as well as outputting a stream to a custom ffmpeg URL.

#tutorials #audio #bandlab #bitrate #broadcaster #camera #capture #code #community #display #encoder #encoding #frame #free #live #livestream #livestreaming #mac #macos #ndi #obs #open #open source #overlay #plugin #program #rate #recording #scene #software #source #stream #streamlabs #studio #tutorial #twitch #ubuntu #update #video #webcam #windows #youtube

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1598461200

An Open-Source Book About the Open Source World

Open source today is a word that often include a lot of things, such as open knowledge (Wikimedia projects), open hardware (Arduino, Raspberry Pi), open formats (ODT/ODS/ODP) and so on.

It is a world of opportunities that can be difficult for newcomers but also for intermediates. This article will help you discover how to approach specific roles, activities or projects/communities in the best way.

Everything Started with “Coaching for OpenSource Communities 2.0”

I decided to write a book in my personal style about my experience in the last 7 to 8 years in open source. I was surprised when I reached 100 pages about various different topics.

My idea was to write something that I would like to read, so nothing that is boring or complicated, but full of real facts.

The second goal was to include my experience but also my philosophy on contributing and how I contribute daily.

Thirdly, I wanted to give a lot of hints and resources and an overall view of this open source world.

Basically, I wanted to write something different from self-help or coaching books that includes just a list of suggestions and best practices. Instead, I take real examples from real life about the OSS world.

As a contributor and developer, I prefer to have real cases to study, because best practices are useful, but we need to learn from others and this world is full of good and bad cases to discover.

In 2019, I started writing a book after Fosdem 2019 and after 2 years inside the Mozilla Reps Council. In that Fosdem edition, I had a talk “Coaching for Open Source Communities 2.0” and after the feedback at the conference and my thoughts in various roles, activities, and projects, it was time to write something.

At the end it wasn’t a manual but a book that included my experience, learnings, best practices and so on in Localization, Development, Project Maintainer, Sysadmin, Community Management, Mentor, Speaker and so on. It contains the following sections:

  • Biography - This choice isn’t for self promotion but just to understand my point of view and my story that can be inspiring for others
  • Philosophy - Not the usual description of Open Source or the 4 freedoms, but just what Open Source means and how you can help
  • How to live inside the Open Source - A discovery about communications and tools, understanding the various kind of people and the best way to talk with your community
  • How to choose a project - Starting with some questions to yourself and how to involve more people in your project
  • The activity - Open Source is based on tasks that can be divided in 2 levels: Support, Testing, Marketing, Development etc
  • How to use your time - We are busy, we have a life, a job and a family but Open Source can be time-consuming
  • Why document is important - How writing documentation can be healthy for your community and the project’s future and brand

There are also three appendices that are manuals which I wrote throughout the years and gathered and improved for this book. They are about: community management, public speaking, and mentoring.

The book ends with my point of view about the future and what we have to do to change opinions about those topics.

I wrote this book and published in October 2019, but it was only possible with the help of reviews and localizers that improved and contributed. Yes, because this book is open source and free for everyone.

I picked the GPL license because this license changed the world and my life in the best way. Using this license is just a tribute. This decision usually is not clear because after all this is a book and there are better licenses like Creative Commons.

#open-source #contributing-to-open-source #programming #software-development #development #coding #books #open-source-software

Ray  Patel

Ray Patel

1623348300

Top 8 Java Open Source Projects You Should Get Your Hands-on [2021]

Learning about Java is no easy feat. It’s a prevalent and in-demand programming language with applications in numerous sectors. We all know that if you want to learn a new skill, the best way to do so is through using it. That’s why we recommend working on projects.

So if you’re a Java student, then you’ve come to the right place as this article will help you learn about the most popular Java open source projects. This way, you’d have a firm grasp of industry trends and the programming language’s applications.

However, before we discuss its various projects, it’s crucial to examine the place where you can get those projects – GitHub. Let’s begin.

#full stack development #java open source projects #java projects #open source projects #top 8 java open source projects #java open source projects

Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1657942860

A Beautiful, Fast & Fully Open Source Mail Client for Mac, Windows

💌 Mailspring

Mailspring is a new version of Nylas Mail maintained by one of the original authors. It's faster, leaner, and shipping today! It replaces the JavaScript sync code in Nylas Mail with a new C++ sync engine based on Mailcore2. It uses roughly half the RAM and CPU of Nylas Mail and idles with almost zero "CPU Wakes", which translates to great battery life. It also has an entirely revamped composer and other great new features.

Mailspring's UI is open source (GPLv3) and written in TypeScript with Electron and React - it's built on a plugin architecture and was designed to be easy to extend. Check out CONTRIBUTING.md to get started!

Mailspring's sync engine is spawned by the Electron application and runs locally on your computer. It is open source (GPLv3) and written in C++ and C. For convenience, however, when you set up your development environment, Mailspring uses the latest version of the sync engine we've shipped for your platform so you don't need to pull sources or install its compile-time dependencies.

Mailspring Screenshot

Features

Mailspring comes packed with powerful features like Unified Inbox, Snooze, Send Later, Mail Rules, Templates and more. Mailspring Pro, which you can unlock with a monthly subscription, adds even more features for people who send a ton of email: link tracking, read receipts, mailbox analytics, contact and company profiles. All of these features run in the client - Mailspring does not send your email credentials to the cloud. For a full list of features, check out getmailspring.com.

Download Mailspring

You can download compiled versions of Mailspring for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux (deb, rpm and snap) from https://getmailspring.com/download.

Getting Help

You can find community-based help and discussion with other Mailspring users on our Discourse community.

Contributing

Mailspring is entirely open-source. Pull requests and contributions are welcome! There are three ways to contribute: building a plugin, building a theme, and submitting pull requests to the project itself. When you're getting started, you may want to join our Discourse so you can ask questions and learn from other people doing development.

Contributor Covenant

Running Mailspring from Source

To install all dependencies and run Mailspring from its source code, run the following commands from the root directory of the Mailspring repository:

export npm_config_arch=x64 # If you are on an M1 / Apple Silicon Mac
npm install
npm start

You can attach command line parameters by separating them using a double hyphen:

npm start -- --help

Building Mailspring

To build Mailspring, you need to run the following command from the root directory of the Mailspring repository:

npm run-script build

Building A Plugin

Plugins lie at the heart of Mailspring and give it its powerful features. Building your own plugins allows you to integrate the app with other tools, experiment with new workflows, and more. Follow the Getting Started guide to write your first plugin in five minutes.

To create your own theme, check out the Mailspring-Theme-Starter.

To create your own plugin, check out the Mailspring-Plugin-Starter.

A plugin "store" like the Chrome Web Store is coming soon, and will make it easy for other users to discover plugins you create. (Right now, users need to "sideload" the plugins into the app by downloading them and copying them into place.)

You can share and browse Mailspring Plugins, and discuss plugin development with other developers, on our Discourse.

Building a Theme

The Mailspring user interface is styled using CSS, which means it's easy to modify and extend. Mailspring comes stock with a few beautiful themes, and there are many more which have been built by community developers. To start creating a theme, clone the theme starter!

If you are updating an existing Nylas theme for Mailspring here is a step by step tutorial. Notice: as part of the update process you will probably need to import mailspring base variables.

You can share and browse Mailspring Themes, and discuss theme development with other developers, on our Discourse.

Localizing / Translating

Mailspring (1.5.0 and above) supports localization. If you're a fluent speaker of another language, we'd love your help improving translations. Check out the LOCALIZATION guide for more information. You can discuss localization and translation with other developers on our Discourse.

Contributing to Mailspring Core

Pull requests are always welcome - check out CONTRIBUTING for more information about setting up the development environment, running tests locally, and submitting pull requests.

Author: Foundry376
Source Code: https://github.com/Foundry376/Mailspring 
License: GPL-3.0 license

#electron #windows #linux #email 

Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1600992000

Did Google Open Sourcing Kubernetes Backfired?

Over the last few years, Kubernetes have become the de-facto standard for container orchestration and has also won the race against Docker for being the most loved platforms among developers. Released in 2014, Kubernetes has come a long way with currently being used across the entire cloudscape platforms. In fact, recent reports state that out of 109 tools to manage containers, 89% of them are leveraging Kubernetes versions.

Although inspired by Borg, Kubernetes, is an open-source project by Google, and has been donated to a vendor-neutral firm — The Cloud Native Computing Foundation. This could be attributed to Google’s vision of creating a platform that can be used by every firm of the world, including the large tech companies and can host multiple cloud platforms and data centres. The entire reason for handing over the control to CNCF is to develop the platform in the best interest of its users without vendor lock-in.

#opinions #google open source #google open source tools #google opening kubernetes #kubernetes #kubernetes platform #kubernetes tools #open source kubernetes backfired