Anil  Sakhiya

Anil Sakhiya

1638255904

Encryption Explained in 35 Mins

Encryption | What is Cryptography? | Cryptography Vs Encryption

In this video, you will learn the basics of encryption, types of encryption, how does encryption work, a few popular encryption algorithms and protocols, and brute force attack. Encryption allows data and text to be in the form of encrypted algorithms and is then placed on a storage cloud. This can ensure the protection of data. Even if the information is stored at the third-party provider, one can access the data safely with the help of encryption and decryption keys.

00:00:00 Introduction                                            
00:01:07 Agenda                                                  
00:01:57 Prerequisites                                         
00:05:14 What is Cryptography?                         
00:06:35 What is Encryption?                              
00:10:42 Cryptography Vs Encryption                 
00:11:25 How does Encryption work?                 
00:13:04 What is Decryption?                              
00:14:13 Encryption Vs Decryption                      
00:15:25 Types of Encryption                               
00:18:21 Encryption Algorithms and Protocols     
00:33:22 What is Brute force attack?                    
00:34:29 Summary                                                

#encryption #cryptography #security 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Encryption Explained in 35 Mins
Anil  Sakhiya

Anil Sakhiya

1638255904

Encryption Explained in 35 Mins

Encryption | What is Cryptography? | Cryptography Vs Encryption

In this video, you will learn the basics of encryption, types of encryption, how does encryption work, a few popular encryption algorithms and protocols, and brute force attack. Encryption allows data and text to be in the form of encrypted algorithms and is then placed on a storage cloud. This can ensure the protection of data. Even if the information is stored at the third-party provider, one can access the data safely with the help of encryption and decryption keys.

00:00:00 Introduction                                            
00:01:07 Agenda                                                  
00:01:57 Prerequisites                                         
00:05:14 What is Cryptography?                         
00:06:35 What is Encryption?                              
00:10:42 Cryptography Vs Encryption                 
00:11:25 How does Encryption work?                 
00:13:04 What is Decryption?                              
00:14:13 Encryption Vs Decryption                      
00:15:25 Types of Encryption                               
00:18:21 Encryption Algorithms and Protocols     
00:33:22 What is Brute force attack?                    
00:34:29 Summary                                                

#encryption #cryptography #security 

Trystan  Doyle

Trystan Doyle

1598640120

Symmetric and Asymmetric Encryption in .NET Core

This post looks at symmetric and asymmetric encryption and how this could be implemented in .NET Core. Symmetric encryption is fast and can encrypt or decrypt large amounts of text, streams or file

#.net #.net core #asp.net core #asymmetric encryption #encryption #symmetric encryption

Zoom Rolls Out End-to-End Encryption After Setbacks

Video-conferencing giant Zoom is rolling out a technical preview of its end-to-end encryption (E2EE) next week.

Zoom has faced various controversies around its encryption policies over the past year, including several lawsuits alleging that the company falsely told users that it offers full encryption. Then, the platform came under fire in May when it announced that it would indeed offer E2EE — but to paid users only. The company later backtracked after backlash from privacy advocates, who argued that security measures should be available to all. Zoom will now offer the feature to free/”Basic” users.

The first phase of the E2EE rollout aims to solicit feedback when it comes to its policies. Users will be able to weigh in during the first 30 days. Of note, users will need to turn on the feature manually (see below for details).

“We’re pleased to roll out Phase 1 of 4 of our E2EE offering, which provides robust protections to help prevent the interception of decryption keys that could be used to monitor meeting content,” said Max Krohn, head of security engineering with Zoom, in a Wednesday post.

End-To-End Encryption Errors

The topic of encryption is critical for Zoom as it ramps up its security and privacy measures – particularly after various security flaws and privacy issues exposed weaknesses in the online meeting platform, as its user base spiked during the coronavirus pandemic.

Zoom previously said that it offered E2EE, but that marketing claim came into question after a March report from The Intercept said that Zoom’s platform actually uses transport layer security (TLS) encryption, providing only encryption between individual users and service providers, instead of directly between the users of a system.

While “encryption” means that in-transit messages are encrypted, true E2EE occurs when the message is encrypted at the source user’s device, stays encrypted while its routed through servers, and then is decrypted only at the destination user’s device.

On the heels of this backlash, Zoom in May acquired a small startup called Keybase, with the aim of providing more robust encryption for Zoom calls.

In the case of next week’s rollout, Zoom’s E2EE offering will use public-key cryptography, meaning that the keys for each Zoom meeting are generated by participants’ machines (as opposed to Zoom’s servers).

#cloud security #vulnerabilities #web security #coronavirus #covid-19 #e2ee #encryption #end to end encryption #pandemic #remote work #security #transport layer security encryption #video conferencing security #zoom #zoom meeting #zoom-bombing

Explaining the Explainable AI: A 2-Stage Approach

As artificial intelligence (AI) models, especially those using deep learning, have gained prominence over the last eight or so years [8], they are now significantly impacting society, ranging from loan decisions to self-driving cars. Inherently though, a majority of these models are opaque, and hence following their recommendations blindly in human critical applications can raise issues such as fairness, safety, reliability, along with many others. This has led to the emergence of a subfield in AI called explainable AI (XAI) [7]. XAI is primarily concerned with understanding or interpreting the decisions made by these opaque or black-box models so that one can appropriate trust, and in some cases, have even better performance through human-machine collaboration [5].

While there are multiple views on what XAI is [12] and how explainability can be formalized [4, 6], it is still unclear as to what XAI truly is and why it is hard to formalize mathematically. The reason for this lack of clarity is that not only must the model and/or data be considered but also the final consumer of the explanation. Most XAI methods [11, 9, 3], given this intermingled view, try to meet all these requirements at the same time. For example, many methods try to identify a sparse set of features that replicate the decision of the model. The sparsity is a proxy for the consumer’s mental model. An important question asks whether we can disentangle the steps that XAI methods are trying to accomplish? This may help us better understand the truly challenging parts as well as the simpler parts of XAI, not to mention it may motivate different types of methods.

Two-Stages of XAI

We conjecture that the XAI process can be broadly disentangled into two parts, as depicted in Figure 1. The first part is uncovering what is truly happening in the model that we want to understand, while the second part is about conveying that information to the user in a consumable way. The first part is relatively easy to formalize as it mainly deals with analyzing how well a simple proxy model might generalize either locally or globally with respect to (w.r.t.) data that is generated using the black-box model. Rather than having generalization guarantees w.r.t. the underlying distribution, we now want them w.r.t. the (conditional) output distribution of the model. Once we have some way of figuring out what is truly important, a second step is to communicate this information. This second part is much less clear as we do not have an objective way of characterizing an individual’s mind. This part, we believe, is what makes explainability as a whole so challenging to formalize. A mainstay for a lot of XAI research over the last year or so has been to conduct user studies to evaluate new XAI methods.

#overviews #ai #explainability #explainable ai #xai

Grace  Lesch

Grace Lesch

1622713333

Homomorphic Encryption: Introduction And Use Cases

Homomorphic Encryption makes it possible to do computation while the data remains encrypted. This will ensure the data remains confidential while it is under process, which provides CSPs and other untrusted environments to accomplish their goals. At the same time, we retain the confidentiality of the data.

Like other [asymmetric encryptions], homomorphic encryption is encrypted using a public key and can only be decrypted by the respective private key. But while the data is encrypted, operations can be performed on the data, which retains confidentiality, and helps organizations achieve compliance even when using untrusted environments.

#database #encrypt #homomorphic encryption