Anissa  Beier

Anissa Beier

1671772144

The Reason I Switched From Ubuntu to OpenSUSE

In this article we will learn about why I switched from Ubuntu to OpenSUSE. After years of relying on Ubuntu and derivatives like Linux Mint, I decided I'd had enough of customizations like the Snap package tool and Network Manager.

I've been using different flavors of Ubuntu for years, including its upstream parent, Debian, and derivatives like Linux Mint, but the more-recent additions like the Snap package tool and the flakiness of Network Manager led me to make the switch once and for all. It's been a great move.

Though I have a Macbook for work, I've preferred Linux over Windows and macOS for my daily driver for the past 10 years. I do a mix of coding, writing, system testing, and a wide range of activities that make Linux fast and easy. When I need tools like VScode, bridge utilities for advanced network configurations, video-editing software, and plain old email, Linux is fast and comfortable.

But when Ubuntu introduced the Snap package manager, I started getting less certain about my Linux environment. I grudgingly accepted the shift from managing my network with /etc/network/interfaces to /etc/netplan/50-config.yaml, but managing packages with both apt and snap made me nervous. I set up network bridges so VMs and LXCs I run using KVN have addresses on my lab subnet. Network Manager is clunky for this, and networkd is less transparent than I'd like.

The openSUSE YaST tool

 

As these issues grew, I started casting about for an alternative. I started with Debian 11, which is solid and more traditional under the covers than Ubuntu (it's also .deb-based), but I wanted still more. I used to work for SUSE and was familiar with using the enterprise server, and decided to use Leap 15.4 — the point release open-source version — instead of Tumbleweed, the rolling release version.

Installing openSUSE

Right from the installer, I felt more comfortable. The openSUSE live .iso install process isn't the fastest in the world, but it provides the ability to make specific system configurations before the first boot. Tasks like partitioning, assigning a static IP, enabling openssh-server, switching from Network Manager to the wicked network manager, and other capabilities are straightforward and appealed to me as a more experienced Linux user.

During the installation, I was offered the choice of desktop environment, including KDE, Gnome, and server. That's a nice touch. It's hard to over-estimate the value of being able to make all these system choices and settings right out of the gate.

Running openSUSE Leap

On first boot, my new Linux system was stable and familiar. Gnome is a solid desktop and it works just as it did under Ubuntu — with a couple convenient differences. Gnome Tweaks is installed by default, for example. Video codecs had to be installed separately but, fortunately, they can be added (along with other features) using community-built one-click installers.

All my other familiar Gnome tools were available, including the terminal, Firefox, Evolution, Libre Office, and typical packages I use without thinking about them. When it came to installing other software, though, I turned to YaST, openSUSE's system-management tool. It's much more powerful than the standard Gnome Settings tool (and Tweaks) and does a lot more than a simple package manager. 

For example, I typically run KVM. YaST includes a virtualization tool that installs hypervisor tools — libvirt, virt-manager and KVM or Xen — in basically one click. The same tool can configure Virt Manager and Docker. The software manager also includes patterns, which are groups of packages that can install desktop environments (a lot are offered), file servers, development environments, and much more in one step. This makes deploying more complex, multifaceted configurations quick and confident.

Finally, the default install uses the btrfs file system, which makes it possible to easily take system snapshots, among other things. Yes, this is possible to use it on other Linux distros, but openSUSE makes it feel like a core capability, which it is. As someone who tests a lot of software, it's nice to be able to jump back to a snapshot of my system.

Final Thoughts

Making the switch from a .deb-based system to an .rpm-based system can seem intimidating, but moving from Ubuntu to openSUSE Leap was painless and brought with it a host of improvements. I feel like my system is more responsive to my way of working, offers a range of capabilities when I need some help, and generally stays out of my way. After all, that's why I choose to run Linux in the first place.

Original article sourced at: https://dzone.com

#ubuntu #OpenSUSE

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The Reason I Switched From Ubuntu to OpenSUSE
Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595429220

How to Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

Microsoft Teams is a communication platform used for Chat, Calling, Meetings, and Collaboration. Generally, it is used by companies and individuals working on projects. However, Microsoft Teams is available for macOS, Windows, and Linux operating systems available now.

In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04 machine. By default, Microsoft Teams package is not available in the Ubuntu default repository. However we will show you 2 methods to install Teams by downloading the Debian package from their official website, or by adding the Microsoft repository.

Install Microsoft Teams on Ubuntu 20.04

1./ Install Microsoft Teams using Debian installer file

01- First, navigate to teams app downloads page and grab the Debian binary installer. You can simply obtain the URL and pull the binary using wget;

$ VERSION=1.3.00.5153
$ wget https://packages.microsoft.com/repos/ms-teams/pool/main/t/teams/teams_${VERSION}_amd64.deb

#linux #ubuntu #install microsoft teams on ubuntu #install teams ubuntu #microsoft teams #teams #teams download ubuntu #teams install ubuntu #ubuntu install microsoft teams #uninstall teams ubuntu

Anissa  Beier

Anissa Beier

1671772144

The Reason I Switched From Ubuntu to OpenSUSE

In this article we will learn about why I switched from Ubuntu to OpenSUSE. After years of relying on Ubuntu and derivatives like Linux Mint, I decided I'd had enough of customizations like the Snap package tool and Network Manager.

I've been using different flavors of Ubuntu for years, including its upstream parent, Debian, and derivatives like Linux Mint, but the more-recent additions like the Snap package tool and the flakiness of Network Manager led me to make the switch once and for all. It's been a great move.

Though I have a Macbook for work, I've preferred Linux over Windows and macOS for my daily driver for the past 10 years. I do a mix of coding, writing, system testing, and a wide range of activities that make Linux fast and easy. When I need tools like VScode, bridge utilities for advanced network configurations, video-editing software, and plain old email, Linux is fast and comfortable.

But when Ubuntu introduced the Snap package manager, I started getting less certain about my Linux environment. I grudgingly accepted the shift from managing my network with /etc/network/interfaces to /etc/netplan/50-config.yaml, but managing packages with both apt and snap made me nervous. I set up network bridges so VMs and LXCs I run using KVN have addresses on my lab subnet. Network Manager is clunky for this, and networkd is less transparent than I'd like.

The openSUSE YaST tool

 

As these issues grew, I started casting about for an alternative. I started with Debian 11, which is solid and more traditional under the covers than Ubuntu (it's also .deb-based), but I wanted still more. I used to work for SUSE and was familiar with using the enterprise server, and decided to use Leap 15.4 — the point release open-source version — instead of Tumbleweed, the rolling release version.

Installing openSUSE

Right from the installer, I felt more comfortable. The openSUSE live .iso install process isn't the fastest in the world, but it provides the ability to make specific system configurations before the first boot. Tasks like partitioning, assigning a static IP, enabling openssh-server, switching from Network Manager to the wicked network manager, and other capabilities are straightforward and appealed to me as a more experienced Linux user.

During the installation, I was offered the choice of desktop environment, including KDE, Gnome, and server. That's a nice touch. It's hard to over-estimate the value of being able to make all these system choices and settings right out of the gate.

Running openSUSE Leap

On first boot, my new Linux system was stable and familiar. Gnome is a solid desktop and it works just as it did under Ubuntu — with a couple convenient differences. Gnome Tweaks is installed by default, for example. Video codecs had to be installed separately but, fortunately, they can be added (along with other features) using community-built one-click installers.

All my other familiar Gnome tools were available, including the terminal, Firefox, Evolution, Libre Office, and typical packages I use without thinking about them. When it came to installing other software, though, I turned to YaST, openSUSE's system-management tool. It's much more powerful than the standard Gnome Settings tool (and Tweaks) and does a lot more than a simple package manager. 

For example, I typically run KVM. YaST includes a virtualization tool that installs hypervisor tools — libvirt, virt-manager and KVM or Xen — in basically one click. The same tool can configure Virt Manager and Docker. The software manager also includes patterns, which are groups of packages that can install desktop environments (a lot are offered), file servers, development environments, and much more in one step. This makes deploying more complex, multifaceted configurations quick and confident.

Finally, the default install uses the btrfs file system, which makes it possible to easily take system snapshots, among other things. Yes, this is possible to use it on other Linux distros, but openSUSE makes it feel like a core capability, which it is. As someone who tests a lot of software, it's nice to be able to jump back to a snapshot of my system.

Final Thoughts

Making the switch from a .deb-based system to an .rpm-based system can seem intimidating, but moving from Ubuntu to openSUSE Leap was painless and brought with it a host of improvements. I feel like my system is more responsive to my way of working, offers a range of capabilities when I need some help, and generally stays out of my way. After all, that's why I choose to run Linux in the first place.

Original article sourced at: https://dzone.com

#ubuntu #OpenSUSE

Chet  Lubowitz

Chet Lubowitz

1595515560

How to Install TeamViewer on Ubuntu 20.04

TeamViewer is a cross-platform, proprietary application that allows a user to remotely connect to a workstation, transfer files, and have online meetings. In this tutorial, we will walk you through how to install TeamViewer on Ubuntu 20.04 Desktop through the command line.

Prerequisites

Before continuing with this tutorial, make sure you are logged in as a user with sudo privileges.

Installing TeamViewer on Ubuntu

01- To install TeamViewer, first, download the TeamViewer .deb package. So, open the Terminal and run the following wget command.

$ wget https://download.teamviewer.com/download/linux/teamviewer_amd64.deb

02- Once you have downloaded the TeamViewer‘s Debian package, execute the following command to install Teamviewer:

$ sudo apt install ./teamviewer_amd64.deb

The system will prompt you with a [Y/n] option. Type ‘Y‘ and hit the enter key in order for to continue the installation.

03- Once the installation is done, you can launch TeamViewer either by typing the command teamviewer in your terminal or by clicking on the TeamViewer icon (Activities -> TeamViewer).

04- A pop-up License Agreement will be displayed. To proceed, click on the Accept License Agreement button.

#linux #ubuntu #install teamviewer #install teamviewer ubuntu #teamviewer #teamviewer ubuntu #teamviewer ubuntu install #ubuntu install teamviewer

Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1592209410

How to Install PgAdmin 4 on Ubuntu 20.04

pgAdmin is the leading graphical Open Source management, development and administration tool for PostgreSQL. pgAdmin4 is a rewrite of the popular pgAdmin3 management tool for the PostgreSQL database.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to install pgAdmin4 in Server Mode as a web application using apache2 and Wsgi module on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

#databases #linux #ubuntu #install pgadmin4 #install pgadmin4 ubuntu #install pgadmin4 ubuntu 20 #pgadmin4 #ubuntu pgadmin4 #ubuntu pgadmin4 install

Myah  Conn

Myah Conn

1591066673

2 Ways to Upgrade Ubuntu 18.04/18.10 To Ubuntu 19.04 (GUI & Terminal)

This tutorial is going to you 2 ways to upgrade Ubuntu 18.04 and Ubuntu 18.10 to 19.04. The first method uses the graphical update manger and the second method uses command line. Usually you use the graphical update manager to upgrade Ubuntu desktop and use command line to upgrade Ubuntu server, but the command-line method works for desktops too.

#ubuntu #linux #ubuntu 19.04 #ubuntu desktop #ubuntu server