Narciso  Legros

Narciso Legros

1624621860

Jenkins for CI Is Dead: Why Do People Hate It and What’s the Alternative?

How to automatically build your Docker images; a case study.

Jenkins is a self-contained, open-source automation server with packages for Windows, Mac OS X, and other Unix-like operating systems.

If you visit the project’s landing page, it informs you that Jenkins is the leading open-source automation server, with hundreds of plugins to support building, deploying, and automating any project.

This statement may be true, but that does not mean that Jenkins provides an easy and straightforward way to achieve all that. On the contrary, the hundreds of plugins it provides and you need to set up if you want to get anything done make the project both versatile and complex as hell.

In this story, we see why Jenkins is not the way to go if you want to build a Continuous Integration (CI) pipeline in 2021 and what’s the alternative. If you have any doubts, it would be great to start a discussion in the comments section!

Learning Rate is a newsletter for those who are curious about the world of AI and MLOps. You’ll hear from me every Friday with updates and thoughts on the latest AI news and articles. Subscribe here!

#github-actions #jenkins #devops #ci

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Jenkins for CI Is Dead: Why Do People Hate It and What’s the Alternative?
Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Narciso  Legros

Narciso Legros

1624621860

Jenkins for CI Is Dead: Why Do People Hate It and What’s the Alternative?

How to automatically build your Docker images; a case study.

Jenkins is a self-contained, open-source automation server with packages for Windows, Mac OS X, and other Unix-like operating systems.

If you visit the project’s landing page, it informs you that Jenkins is the leading open-source automation server, with hundreds of plugins to support building, deploying, and automating any project.

This statement may be true, but that does not mean that Jenkins provides an easy and straightforward way to achieve all that. On the contrary, the hundreds of plugins it provides and you need to set up if you want to get anything done make the project both versatile and complex as hell.

In this story, we see why Jenkins is not the way to go if you want to build a Continuous Integration (CI) pipeline in 2021 and what’s the alternative. If you have any doubts, it would be great to start a discussion in the comments section!

Learning Rate is a newsletter for those who are curious about the world of AI and MLOps. You’ll hear from me every Friday with updates and thoughts on the latest AI news and articles. Subscribe here!

#github-actions #jenkins #devops #ci

Jenkins Is Getting Old — It’s Time to Move On

By far, Jenkins is the most adopted tool for continuous integration, owning nearly 50% of the market share. As so many developers are using it, it has excellent community support, like no other Jenkins alternative. With that, it has more than 1,500 plugins available for continuous integration and delivery purposes.

We love and respect Jenkins. After all, it’s the first tool we encountered at the beginning of our automation careers. But as things are rapidly changing in the automation field, Jenkins is** left behind with his old approach**. Even though many developers and companies are using it, most of them aren’t happy with it. Having used it ourselves on previous projects, we quickly became frustrated by its lack of functionality, numerous maintenance issues, dependencies, and scaling problems.

We decided to investigate if other developers face the same problems and quickly saw the need to create a tool ourselves. We asked some developers at last year’s AWS Summit in Berlin about this. Most of them told us that they chose Jenkins because it’s free in the first place. However, many of them expressed interest in trying to use some other Jenkins alternative.

#devops #continuous integration #jenkins #devops adoption #jenkins ci #jenkins pipeline #devops continuous integration #jenkins automation #jenkins scripts #old technology

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1600938000

13 Jenkins Alternatives for Continuous Integration

In our previous article , we discussed the most common problems with Jenkins  that made us search for an alternative. That’s why in this article, we’re offering a list of the most common Jenkins alternatives for continuous integration.

#uncategorized #ci/cd #ci/cd pipeline #continuous integration #gitlab ci #jenkins #jenkins alternatives

Alycia  Klein

Alycia Klein

1598619600

Travis CI vs Jenkins: Which CI/CD Tool Is Right For You?

As a DevOps professional, you need to evaluate these tools based on your budget, project requirements, and other data points. This is why we take a deep dive into  Travis CI vs Jenkinscomparison to help you decide the right CI/CD tool for your project requirements.

If you are new to DevOps and are just learning the basics then I recommend you to read this detailed article on  Continuous Integration And Continuous Delivery. Without further ado, let’s get started.

What Is Jenkins?

Jenkins is a popular open-source CI/CD tool that is in usage for a long time. The tool is written entirely in Java. Jenkins has a powerful set of features that can be used to build, test, and integrate changes in a project.

jenkins

It is the go-to choice for startups as it is free to use, supports a wide range of plugins, and is backed by a vibrant community. Developers get the chance to set up a CI/CD environment in Jenkins. Jenkins is available for a wide range of platforms – Windows, macOS, and various flavors of Unix (i.e. Ubuntu, OpenSUSE, and more).

Another major of Jenkins is its extensibility with plugins. Like other open-source projects, Jenkins maintains two release lines – weekly and LTS (Long Term Support). At the time of this article, the latest version of Jenkins (LTS) was 2.235.1.

Salient features of Jenkins

  • Open source and free for use.
  • Extensive plugin ecosystem.
  • Vibrant community.
  • Supports parallel execution.
  • Ease to set up.
  • Offers REST API.
  • Can be configured using Jenkinsfile.

#devops #continous delivery #jenkins ci #ci cd #travis ci #continous deployment #jenkins architecture