Avav Smith

Avav Smith

1571991764

Secure Authentication React With JWT Tokens

Although authentication is a common requirement for web apps, it can be difficult to get it right, especially if you’re by yourself or part of a small team. That’s why many sites choose to use OAuth 2.0 to let a third-party handle authentication for them. They just need to know how to decode a JSON Web Token (JWT), rather than how to store a bunch of user information and pray they aren’t the next company with leaked passwords.

Today I’ll shed some light on what exactly a JWT is, and how to use one in practice. If you follow along, you’ll learn how to create an app in React with Okta as a third-party to authenticate users. You’ll learn how to decode the JWT and use it to make decisions about what to display on the screen.

Understand JWTs

If you’re wondering, “I don’t know what a JWT is, or even how to pronounce it.” The official RFC specification says to just pronounce it like the word “jot.” As far as what a JWT is? Put simply, it’s a way to make a set of easily readable and verifiable claims that cannot be easily recreated without a secret key.

A good analogy would be a driver’s license. The government does the work to verify your identity and your ability to drive, then issues you a card with some information on it and an expiration date. You can use your license to verify your name, birthday, address, etc. to anyone who asks. You could put that information on any piece of paper, but a driver’s license has additional security. It may have some watermarks, an electronic chip, a barcode, something only seen under ultraviolet light; plenty of ways for someone to verify its validity, but very difficult for you to recreate at home.

A JWT is pretty much the same thing. As a user, you sign in to some trusted third-party the old fashioned way (with a username and password, for example). You’re then issued a string with a JSON payload with things like your username, some user permissions, and an expiration date. The string also contains an encrypted portion (the signature) and another JSON payload with information about which encryption algorithm was used. You can verify the two JSON payloads could be used to make that signature with a public key, but you can’t recreate the signature without a secret key stored securely on the issuer’s server. Some algorithms will just use a single secret key, which is simpler, and good enough for when you only need to verify on a server where the secret won’t be shared anywhere.

When your app receives a JWT, you can run some basic checks against it:

  • Is it a valid signature?
  • Has it expired?
  • Is the issuer who I expected it to be?

If everything checks out, you can use the rest of the payload in the app, for example, to determine what a user’s name is or if they’re an admin or not.

Structure of a JWT

Here is an example JWT:

eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiIsInR5cCI6IkpXVCJ9.eyJ1c2VybmFtZSI6InRoZW9ybml0aG9sb2dpc3QiLCJzdXJuYW1lIjoiQm9uZCIsIm5hbWUiOiJKYW1lcyBCb25kIiwiaWF0Ijo5NDY2ODQ4MDB9.uOP6fIf8dhgb7As5D0a4z6EjaXsudQgrKWj8PmoWFd0

Two periods split the JWT into three parts - the first two are the header and payload, which are just base64 encoded. You can decode them without the secret to get this payload:

{
 "username": "theornithologist",
 "surname": "Bond",
 "name": "James Bond",
 "iat": 946684800
}

You can also verify the JWT with the (not-so-)secret, Birds of the West Indies.

How to Build a Simple React App

Today, you’ll build a simple search bar to search through a set of users. Before you get to the code, you’ll need to install a couple dependencies. Then, you can bootstrap a React app and be up and running in no time.

First, to check if you have Node installed, type node --version in the terminal. If you get an error, it’s not installed yet. If you have an old version (let’s say under 8, since it gives you async/await), you might want to consider an upgrade. A great way to install Node, while making it easy to upgrade later or manage different versions simultaneously, is the Node Version Manager (NVM). You can use this command to install it:

curl -o- https://raw.githubusercontent.com/nvm-sh/nvm/v0.34.0/install.sh | bash

Note: If you run into issues, make sure to check out NVM’s installation guide as they cover a lot of edge cases.

Next, you’ll need to set up the project. If you don’t already have them installed, install yarn and create-react-app:

npm i -g yarn@1.16.0 create-react-app@3.0.1

Now use create-react-app to bootstrap a new React project, then start the app:

create-react-app react-jwts
cd react-jwts
yarn start

The yarn start command starts the server, which will watch for any changes you make to any files and automatically reload the page. You should now see the default app up at http://localhost:3000.

Add a Search UI and API With Semantic UI, Fuse.js, and the Hooks API

With the basic app up and running, you need to install a few dependencies. For the frontend you can use faker.js to generate fake data (for now, rather than pulling data via an API). The app will also look much nicer without a lot of extra code if you use a UI framework such as Semantic UI. For client-side search, I like Fuse.js. Add them as dependencies:

yarn add faker@4.1.0 semantic-ui-react@0.87.2 semantic-ui-css@2.4.1 fuse.js@3.4.5

To start, create an “API” to fetch your set of users. If you make it an async function, it will simulate connecting to a real backend, so you can simply replace this function and the rest of your app would still work the same. Make a new file api.js:

src/api.js

import faker from 'faker';

const users = [...new Array(1000)].map(() => ({
  id: faker.random.uuid(),
  avatar: faker.image.avatar(),
  username: faker.internet.userName(),
  name: `${faker.name.firstName()} ${faker.name.lastName()}`,
}));

export const fetchUsers = async () => users;

Next, create three new components:

  1. A header for the page
  2. An autocomplete search input
  3. A card to display the selected user

First, add the header:

src/Header.js

import React from 'react';
import { Container, Menu, Image } from 'semantic-ui-react';

import logo from './logo.svg';

export default ({ selectedUser }) => {
  const pageName = selectedUser ? selectedUser.name : '';

  return (
    <Menu fixed="top" inverted>
      <Container>
        <Menu.Item header>
          <Image size="mini" src={logo} />
          User Search
        </Menu.Item>
        <Menu.Item style={{ flex: 1 }}>{pageName}</Menu.Item>
      </Container>
    </Menu>
  );
};

This takes a selectedUser prop, which you’ll need to pass in from the App component. Next, create the search component:

src/Search.js

import React from 'react';
import { Container, Search } from 'semantic-ui-react';
import Fuse from 'fuse.js';

export default ({ users, selectUser }) => {
  const [term, setTerm] = React.useState('');
  const filteredUsers = React.useMemo(() => {
    if (!term || !users) return users || [];
    const fuse = new Fuse(users, {
      shouldSort: true,
      keys: ['name', 'username'],
    });

    return fuse.search(term);
  }, [users, term]);

  return (
    <Container>
      <Search
        loading={!users}
        onResultSelect={(e, { result }) => {
          setTerm('');
          selectUser(result.user);
        }}
        onSearchChange={e => setTerm(e.currentTarget.value)}
        results={filteredUsers.slice(0, 5).map(user => ({
          childKey: user.id,
          title: user.name,
          description: user.username,
          image: user.avatar,
          user,
        }))}
        value={term}
      />
    </Container>
  );
};

This component uses React’s relatively new Hooks API. This component will store the search term locally, rather than in some global state, since other components don’t need to know it. The useState hook can be used in a functional component and takes a little less code when you only have one piece of state like in this component.

The useMemo hook ensures that if there are multiple renders of the component, the search will only be done once. Search can be a relatively expensive operation, especially as the dataset grows in size.

Again, you haven’t defined the required props yet. You’ll need to pass in the set of users and a function to select a user from the main App component. Next, create a component to display the selected user:

src/SelectedUser.js

import React from 'react';
import { Message, Card, Image } from 'semantic-ui-react';

export default ({ selected, selectUser }) => {
  if (!selected) return null;

  return (
    <Card style={{ marginTop: '2em' }}>
      <Message
        attached
        header={selected.name}
        onDismiss={() => selectUser(null)}
      />
      <Image src={selected.avatar} wrapped ui={false} />
      <Card.Content>
        <Card.Header>{selected.username}</Card.Header>
      </Card.Content>
    </Card>
  );
};

If no user is selected, this simply won’t render anything. Otherwise, you’ll get a card with the user. You’ll also get a button to deselect the user, so you’ll also need the parent component to pass in a selectUser function here.

In your src/index.js file, replace the ./index.css import with the Semantic UI CSS.

import 'semantic-ui-css/semantic.min.css';

Your App.js file now needs to reference the new components you just made. Your App.js file should end up looking like this:

import * as React from 'react';
import { Container } from 'semantic-ui-react';

import { fetchUsers } from './api';

import Header from './Header';
import Search from './Search';
import SelectedUser from './SelectedUser';

const App = () => {
  const [users, setUsers] = React.useState(null);
  const [selectedUser, selectUser] = React.useState(null);

  React.useEffect(() => {
    fetchUsers().then(setUsers);
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      <Header selectedUser={selectedUser} />
      <Container style={{ paddingTop: '7em' }}>
        <Search users={users} selectUser={selectUser} />
        <SelectedUser selected={selectedUser} selectUser={selectUser} />
      </Container>
    </div>
  );
};

export default App;

The useEffect hook fetches the list of users. When you pass in the empty array ([]), you tell React you only want to run this effect on the very first call. If you left the array out, it would run every time this component renders. If you were to add some variables into the array, it would run any time any of those variables changed.

Go ahead and give it a whirl! You should be able to search through a set of (fake) users, select one, choose another, etc.

Select a User

Create an Okta Application

One simple way to add authentication to your project is with Okta. Okta is a cloud service that allows developers to create, edit, and securely store user accounts and user account data, and connect them with one or multiple applications. The API enables you to:

If you don’t already have one, sign up for a forever-free developer account. Log in to your developer console, navigate to Applications, then click Add Application. Select Single-Page App, then click Next.

Since Create React App runs on port 3000 by default, add it as a Base URI and Login Redirect URI. Your settings should look like this:

Create New Application Settings

Click Done to save your app, then copy your Client ID and paste it into the .env.local file as a variable. This will allow you to access the file in your code without storing your credentials in source control. You’ll need to add your organization URL (without the -admin suffix) to that file as well. Environment variables (other than NODE_ENV) need to start with REACT_APP_ in order for Create React App to read them, so the file should end up like this:

.env.local

REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID={yourClientId}
REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL=https://{yourOktaOrgUrl}

Add User Claims

Okta allows you to add users to groups, for example, an Admins or Managers group. By default, each user is already in the Everyone group. For this tutorial, I’ll show you how to determine which groups your user is in. This does require a little extra configuration for your Okta application.

While you’re still signed in to your Okta account:

  • Navigate to API -> Authorization Servers
  • Click on the default server, then the Claims tab
  • Click Add Claim and give it a name of groups
  • Change Include in token type to ID Token
  • For Value type, select Groups
  • Under Filter, change the Starts with dropdown to Matches regex and enter .* in the text field next to it
  • Click Create to save it.

Add Groups Claim

Next, navigate to Users -> Groups. Click the Add Group button and create a new group called Admins, and give it a friendly description, then click Add Group.

Add Admins Group

Click on the new group you just created, then click Add Members.Type your name into the search bar, then click the Add button next to your user. An additional account not in the Admins group will make testing easier

Connect Okta to Your React App

Now your Okta application is ready to go, you’ll need two more dependencies to connect it to your React app.

yarn add @okta/okta-react@1.2.0 react-router-dom@5.0.1

Restart your server in order to pick up the new environment variables from .env.local. You can close the terminal hosting it or kill the process with ctrl-C, then use yarn start to start it back up again.

Okta’s React tools make it easy to authenticate users. The service will do all the heavy lifting and simply give you a JWT you can use as you please. Okta also provides a Higher-Order Component (HoC) to pass in an auth prop to a component.

Whenever some piece of auth changes (such as the user or token), the component wrapped in the HoC will be re-rendered, and then you can query the auth prop for changes. In order to make sure the entire app has access to pieces of that data, you can allow components to subscribe to React’s Context API.

Create a new file Auth.js to store the Auth Context and a component to watch for updates.

src/Auth.js

import * as React from 'react';
import { withRouter } from 'react-router-dom';
import { withAuth } from '@okta/okta-react';

export const AuthContext = React.createContext();

const getUserFromToken = token => {
  if (token) {
    try {
      return JSON.parse(atob(token.split('.')[1]));
    } catch (error) {
      // ignore
    }
  }

  return null;
};

export const AuthProvider = ({ children }) => {
  const [state, setState] = React.useReducer((oldState, newState) => newState, {
    loading: true,
    token: undefined,
    user: null,
  });

  const updateAuth = async auth => {
    const token = (await auth.getIdToken()) || null;
    if (token !== state.token) {
      setState({
        token,
        loading: false,
        user: getUserFromToken(token),
      });
    }
  };

  return (
    <AuthContext.Provider value={{ ...state, updateAuth }}>
      {children}
    </AuthContext.Provider>
  );
};

export const AuthHandler = withAuth(
  withRouter(({ auth, location }) => {
    const { updateAuth } = React.useContext(AuthContext);

    React.useEffect(() => {
      updateAuth(auth);
    });

    React.useEffect(() => {
      if (location.pathname === '/login') auth.login('/');
      if (location.pathname === '/logout') auth.logout('/');
    }, [auth, location.pathname]);

    return null;
  }),
);

React.createContext() creates the context. Once exported, other components can subscribe to the consumer with AuthContext.Consumer or with the useContext hook.

Decode A JWT and Manage User States and Changes

Remember when I talked earlier about how to decode a JWT? This helper function will parse the JWT to get the user for you. The browser’s built-in atob Javascript function can be used to convert a base64-encoded string to plain text (in this case a JSON string). Then JSON.parse converts it to an actual javascript object. We only care about the payload, which is the second part of the .-separated token.

const getUserFromToken = token => {
  if (token) {
    try {
      return JSON.parse(atob(token.split('.')[1]));
    } catch (error) {
      // ignore
    }
  }

  return null;
};

Wrap your App component with the AuthProvider to listen for updates from the AuthHandler, and provide any pieces of auth state to any subscribers. This uses the useReducer hook in order to set multiple pieces of state at once and avoid unnecessary re-renders.

export const AuthProvider = ({ children }) => {
  const [state, setState] = React.useReducer((oldState, newState) => newState, {
    loading: true,
    token: undefined,
    user: null,
  });

  const updateAuth = async auth => {
    const token = (await auth.getIdToken()) || null;
    if (token !== state.token) {
      setState({
        token,
        loading: false,
        user: getUserFromToken(token),
      });
    }
  };

  return (
    <AuthContext.Provider value={{ ...state, updateAuth }}>
      {children}
    </AuthContext.Provider>
  );
};

The AuthHandler connects to both Okta’s withAuth HoC to access auth, as well as React Router’s withRouter HoC to access the current location. You could use window.location, but React Router allows you to easily listen to changes and guarantees this component will render when the route changes. Combined with a useEffect, you’ll be able to log the user in or out when they visit the /login or /logout routes.

export const AuthHandler = withAuth(
  withRouter(({ auth, location }) => {
    const { updateAuth } = React.useContext(AuthContext);

    React.useEffect(() => {
      updateAuth(auth);
    });

    React.useEffect(() => {
      if (location.pathname === '/login') auth.login('/');
      if (location.pathname === '/logout') auth.logout('/');
    }, [auth, location.pathname]);

    return null;
  }),
);

Wrap your app with the provider and add in the AuthHandler. To set up your app to listen to Okta, you’ll also need to add some more context wrappers to App:

src/App.js

// Add this to the top of the file
import { Switch, Route, BrowserRouter as Router } from 'react-router-dom';
import { Security, ImplicitCallback } from '@okta/okta-react';
import { AuthHandler, AuthProvider, AuthContext } from './Auth';

// Replace your `export default` at the bottom of the file with this:
export default () => (
  <AuthProvider>
    <Router>
      <Security
        issuer={`${process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL}/oauth2/default`}
        client_id={process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID}
        redirect_uri={`${window.location.origin}/implicit/callback`}
      >
        <Switch>
          <Route path="/implicit/callback" component={ImplicitCallback} />
          <Route path="/" component={App} />
        </Switch>
      </Security>
    </Router>
  </AuthProvider>
);

If you update your API’s fetchUsers function to accept a user, you can check whether your user is in the Admins group or not, and add some more information if they are.

src/api.js

export const fetchUsers = async authUser =>
  authUser && authUser.groups.includes('Admins')
    ? users.map(user => ({
        ...faker.helpers.userCard(),
        ...user,
      }))
    : users;

Pass the user into the call to fetchUsers in your app and change the useEffect in your App component to depend on the user. This updates a logged in user with changes. After you select a user as an admin, hide sensitive information when you log out. This verifies that only admins can see sensitive information. Replace your useEffect call in App.js to this:

src/App.js

const auth = React.useContext(AuthContext);

React.useEffect(() => {
  fetchUsers(auth.user).then(nextUsers => {
    setUsers(nextUsers);
    selectUser(
      selected => selected && nextUsers.find(({ id }) => id === selected.id),
    );
  });
}, [auth.user]);

While you’re in App.js, add the AuthHandler to listen for changes. You don’t need to pass any props to this, and it doesn’t render anything, so add it anywhere. You can add <AuthHandler /> after </Container> for example. Your final App.js should look like this:

src/App.js

import * as React from 'react';
import { Container } from 'semantic-ui-react';
import { Switch, Route, BrowserRouter as Router } from 'react-router-dom';
import { Security, ImplicitCallback } from '@okta/okta-react';

import { fetchUsers } from './api';

import Header from './Header';
import Search from './Search';
import SelectedUser from './SelectedUser';
import { AuthHandler, AuthProvider, AuthContext } from './Auth';

const App = () => {
  const [users, setUsers] = React.useState(null);
  const [selectedUser, selectUser] = React.useState(null);
  const auth = React.useContext(AuthContext);

  React.useEffect(() => {
    fetchUsers(auth.user).then(nextUsers => {
      setUsers(nextUsers);
      selectUser(
        selected => selected && nextUsers.find(({ id }) => id === selected.id),
      );
    });
  }, [auth.user]);

  return (
    <div>
      <Header selectedUser={selectedUser} />
      <Container style={{ paddingTop: '7em' }}>
        <Search users={users} selectUser={selectUser} />
        <SelectedUser selected={selectedUser} selectUser={selectUser} />
      </Container>
      <AuthHandler />
    </div>
  );
};

export default () => (
  <AuthProvider>
    <Router>
      <Security
        issuer={`${process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_ORG_URL}/oauth2/default`}
        client_id={process.env.REACT_APP_OKTA_CLIENT_ID}
        redirect_uri={`${window.location.origin}/implicit/callback`}
      >
        <Switch>
          <Route path="/implicit/callback" component={ImplicitCallback} />
          <Route path="/" component={App} />
        </Switch>
      </Security>
    </Router>
  </AuthProvider>
);

Update Your UI to Reflect Auth Changes

You’ve already modified the API to provide more information, but you don’t display it anywhere. To update the UI, add a few Card.Meta items to the SelectedUser component, just after the Card.Header, so the existing Card.Content now looks like this:

src/SelectedUser.js

<Card.Content>
  <Card.Header>{selected.username}</Card.Header>
  {selected.email && <Card.Meta>{selected.email}</Card.Meta>}
  {selected.phone && <Card.Meta>{selected.phone}</Card.Meta>}
  {selected.address && <Card.Meta>{selected.address.city}</Card.Meta>}
</Card.Content>

To ensure users can navigate without typing in the URL themselves, add some code to Header to display some info the current user.

src/Header.js

import React from 'react';
import { Container, Menu, Image, Dropdown, Loader } from 'semantic-ui-react';
import { Link } from 'react-router-dom';

import logo from './logo.svg';
import { AuthContext } from './Auth';

export default ({ selectedUser }) => {
  const pageName = selectedUser ? selectedUser.name : '';
  const auth = React.useContext(AuthContext);

  return (
    <Menu fixed="top" inverted>
      <Container>
        <Menu.Item header>
          <Image size="mini" src={logo} />
          User Search
        </Menu.Item>
        <Menu.Item style={{ flex: 1 }}>{pageName}</Menu.Item>
      </Container>

      {auth.loading || !auth.user ? (
        <Menu.Item>
          {auth.loading ? (
            <Loader active inline />
          ) : (
            <Link to="/login">Sign In</Link>
          )}
        </Menu.Item>
      ) : (
        <Dropdown
          item
          simple
          text={
            auth.user.groups.includes('Admins')
              ? `${auth.user.name} (Admin)`
              : auth.user.name
          }
        >
          <Dropdown.Menu>
            <Dropdown.Item as={Link} to="/logout">
              Sign out
            </Dropdown.Item>
          </Dropdown.Menu>
        </Dropdown>
      )}
    </Menu>
  );
};

When the app first loads, the user state starts out as null and Okta needs to get you a token. In the meantime, you display a spinner with <Loader active inline />. If you’re logged out, you get a link to sign in. If you’re already logged in, it displays your name with a dropdown option to log back out. If you’re logged in as an Admin it’ll tell you right in the header.

Admin View vs Public View

Use Okta’s React Library to Decode the JWT

You can leverage Okta’s React library to decode the JWT instead of doing it yourself. Simply call auth.getUser() to return a promise that contains the user (or null):

In Auth.js, your updateAuth function should now look like this:

src/Auth.js

const updateAuth = async auth => {
  const token = (await auth.getIdToken()) || null;
  if (token !== state.token) {
    setState({
      token,
      loading: false,
      user: await auth.getUser(),
    });
  }
};

Note: You might not need token here, but I left it for a couple of reasons. Mainly, API requests in other parts of the app might need the token. Your backend can decode this token to ensure you’re authenticated. Also, since a token is just a string, you can just use a strict equals comparison (===) to monitor changes.

#reactjs #react #javascript #JWT #Authentication

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Buddha Community

Secure Authentication React  With JWT Tokens

How To Set Up Two-Factor Authentication in cPanel

What is 2FA
Two-Factor Authentication (or 2FA as it often referred to) is an extra layer of security that is used to provide users an additional level of protection when securing access to an account.
Employing a 2FA mechanism is a vast improvement in security over the Singe-Factor Authentication method of simply employing a username and password. Using this method, accounts that have 2FA enabled, require the user to enter a one-time passcode that is generated by an external application. The 2FA passcode (usually a six-digit number) is required to be input into the passcode field before access is granted. The 2FA input is usually required directly after the username and password are entered by the client.

#tutorials #2fa #access #account security #authentication #authentication method #authentication token #cli #command line #cpanel #feature manager #google authenticator #one time password #otp #otp authentication #passcode #password #passwords #qr code #security #security code #security policy #security practices #single factor authentication #time-based one-time password #totp #two factor authentication #whm

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1622798007

Angular 12 + Spring Boot: JWT Authentication example | Spring Security

In this tutorial, I will show you how to build a full stack Angular 12 + Spring Boot JWT Authentication example. The back-end server uses Spring Boot with Spring Security for JWT Authentication & Role based Authorization, Spring Data JPA for interacting with database. The front-end will be built using Angular 12 with HttpInterceptor & Form validation.

Related Posts:

– Angular 12 + Spring Boot: CRUD example

– Angular 12 + Spring Boot: File upload example

– Spring Boot, MongoDB: JWT Authentication with Spring Security

Contents [hide]

#angular #full stack #spring #angular #angular 12 #authentication #authorization #jwt #login #registration #security #spring boot #spring security #token based authentication

Wiley  Mayer

Wiley Mayer

1601002800

Need Security Tokens for Java? Try JPaseto

To circumvent the issues with JSON Web Tokens, try PASETO; a new security token format, made for quick and easy accessibility, free of the complications of JWT. PASETO, or Platform Agnostic SEcurity TOkens was created by Scott Arciszewski  as a draft RFC spec. PASETO can provide the needed security functions that applications need, in addition to reducing the scope of JavaScript Object Signing and Encryption, (JOSE) family of specs, including JWT.

#security #authentication #accessibility #jwt #security tokens #jwt vulnerabilities #pasedo

I Dev

1608261414

React Redux: Token Authentication example with JWT & Axios

In this tutorial, we’re gonna build a React + Redux Application for Token Authentication example with JWT, LocalStorage, React Router, Axios and Bootstrap. I will show you:

  • JWT Authentication Flow for User Signup & User Login
  • Project Structure for React Redux JWT Authentication, LocalStorage, Router, Axios
  • Working with Redux Actions, Reducers, Store for Application state
  • Creating React Components with Form Validation
  • React Components for accessing protected Resources (Authorization)
  • Dynamic Navigation Bar in React App

Inside tutorial, you can also find Spring Boot backend that works well with this React Client:

  • one working with MySQL/PostgreSQL
  • and one working with MongoDB

Overview of React Redux JWT Authentication example

We will build a React application in that:

  • There are Login/Logout, Signup pages.
  • Form data will be validated by front-end before being sent to back-end.
  • Depending on User’s roles (admin, moderator, user), Navigation Bar changes its items automatically.

Here are the screenshots:
– Signup Page:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-signup

– Signup failed:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-signup-email-duplicate

– Form Validation Support:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-form-validation

– Login Page:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-login

– Profile Page (for successful Login):

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-profile-page

– For Moderator account login, the navigation bar will change by authorities:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-authorization-login

– Check Browser Local Storage:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-local-storage

– Check State in Redux using redux-devtools-extension:

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-redux-devtools-extension

User Registration and User Login Flow

For JWT Authentication, we’re gonna call 2 endpoints:

  • POST api/auth/signup for User Registration
  • POST api/auth/signin for User Login

The following flow shows you an overview of Requests and Responses that React Client will make or receive. This React Client must add a JWT to HTTP Header before sending request to protected resources.

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-flow

You can find step by step to implement these back-end servers in following tutorial:

React Component Diagram with Redux, Router, Axios

Let’s look at the diagram below.

react-redux-jwt-authentication-token-example-project-overview

For more details, implementation and Github Source code, please visit:
https://bezkoder.com/react-redux-jwt-auth/

#react #redux #authentication #security #jwt #javascript