Royce  Reinger

Royce Reinger

1620464301

Top 30 Git Commands You Should Know About

If you are a part of a professional  software development setting, you would know how things work when it comes to writing code. There are usually different teams that write code – the development environment could have a team of developers that are sitting in the same location working closely with a team that is collaborating with them remotely from another part of the globe.

Both these teams write their code and contribute to a central codebase. This is where  version control systems or VCSs come into play. They manage codebase that collects code from different sources.

What is a version control system?

A version control system is a single point of reference for the contribution and management of all the stages and releases of a product, and it does this job without the need for having multiple files or folders. VCSs take out the issues that usually arise during the development phase, and streamline the entire process by not making developers trade files or folders.

Developers instead have a single source that they need to communicate with. It is this source that sees all the changes in the code. All the files are saved in this location. We have two types of VCSs that developers make use of around the world depending on their needs. These VCSs are

Centralized version control systems: These VCSs make use of a centralized repository where the project or codebase exists. This centralized project consists of all the files that are contributed by the developers of a team. If any developer wants to make changes to the project or the files stored in it, they need access to enter this repository.

Distributed version control systems: In these VCSs, things are a lot more flexible than their centralized counterparts. Mercurial and Git are the most common examples of distributed VCSs. In this system, every developer has its own local repository that not only has the code written by them and the changes that they made to it over a period of time but also their releases as well as those of other developers.

How does git work?

Git doesn’t work in the same way that most of the other version control systems do. Unlike other VCSs that calculate differences in files and sums these differences up to arrive at the saved version, git uses snapshots of your files system to do the job. Whenever you commit changes to the files or save the changed state of the project, you will have git taking a snapshot of the system and then saving it as a reference.

Files that don’t undergo any change will have their previous snapshot stored as a reference. Git provides developers a string of commands to help them perform different tasks. We will discuss top 30 git commands that are most commonly used by open source developers.

Git states

Git commands

1. Configure details:

2. Initialize repositories:

3. Add files:

4. Verify files that are added:

5. Commit repository changes:

6. Display logs:

7. Verify git branches:

8. Reset branches:

9. Add new branches:

10. Switch between branches:

11. Display version:

12. Consult manual page:

13. Manage git configuration:

14. Summarize log info:

15. View modifications for each commit:

16. Validate object database:

17. List unpacked objects:

18. Pack objects that aren’t already packed:

19. Manage working trees:

20. Look for patterns:

21. Display remote repositories:

22. Push updates:

23. Pull new updates:

24. Clone repositories:

25. Stash working directory:

26. Revert existing commits:

27. Merge two branches:

28. Check differences between files, commits, and tress:

29. Add tags to projects:

30. Fetch remote data:

#full stack development #git #git commands

Top 30 Git Commands You Should Know About
Monty  Boehm

Monty Boehm

1620615985

Top 35 Git Commands With Examples

Git commands are essential, and they help to manage your source code effectively. In this guide, you will learn Git commands from Beginners to Advanced level.

If you are a new or experienced developer, you have to use source control. And good chances are you are using Git to manage your source code.

And to use Git to its full potential, you need to know Git commands. Here you will learn the most helpful Git commands that will take you from one level to another.

To make this Git commands guide more helpful, I have divided the guide into three different sections: Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Git commands.

This is an epic guide. And to make it more useful, I have added a Bonus section where you can download  51+ Git commands and a few more downloads to boost your productivity in Git.

Basic Git Commands

In this section, you will learn the essential Git commands. These basic Git commands are the foundation to learn more advanced commands.

Here are the nine useful Git commands.

1. git config

2. git version

3. git init

4. git clone

5. git add

6. git commit

7. git status

8. git branch

9. git checkout

10. git remote

11. git push

13. git fetch

14. git pull

15. git stash

16. git log

17. git shortlog

18. git show

19. git rm

20. git merge

21. git rebase

22. git bisect

23. git cherry-pick

24. git archive

26. git blame

27. git tag

28. git verify-commit

29. git verify-tag

30. git diff

31. git citool

32. git mv

33. git clean

34. git help

35. git whatchanged

#git #git commands #git commits #git tutorial

Top 35 Git Commands With Examples
Myriam  Rogahn

Myriam Rogahn

1593435300

Basic Git Commands you need to Master

In this part you will get familiar with some basic Git commands. At the end of this blog you will be able to perform certain task like

  • Set up a folder as a Git repository
  • Perform basic Git operations on your Git repository

These are those commands you must conquer

Basic Git Commands

  • At any location on your computer, create a folder named git-test.
  • Open this git-test folder in your favorite editor.
  • Add a file named index.html to this folder, and add the following HTML code to this file:
<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
<h1>Sab Batade Aapko</h1>
</body>
</html>

Initializing the folder as a Git repository

  • Go to the git-test folder in your cmd window/terminal and type the following command at the prompt to initialize the folder as a Git repository:
git init

this command will make a file named .git

#github #git #basic-git-commands #git-commands #git-status

Basic Git Commands you need to Master

7 Best Practices in GIT for Your Code Quality

There is no doubt that Git plays a significant role in software development. It allows developers to work on the same code base at the same time. Still, developers struggle for code quality. Why? They fail to follow git best practices. In this post, I will explain seven core best practices of Git and a Bonus Section.

1. Atomic Commit

Committing something to Git means that you have changed your code and want to save these changes as a new trusted version.

Version control systems will not limit you in how you commit your code.

  • You can commit 1000 changes in one single commit.
  • Commit all the dll and other dependencies
  • Or you can check in broken code to your repository.

But is it good? Not quite.

Because you are compromising code quality, and it will take more time to review codeSo overall, team productivity will be reduced. The best practice is to make an atomic commit.

When you do an atomic commit, you’re committing only one change. It might be across multiple files, but it’s one single change.

2. Clarity About What You Can (& Can’t) Commit

Many developers make some changes, then commit, then push. And I have seen many repositories with unwanted files like dll, pdf, etc.

You can ask two questions to yourself, before check-in your code into the repository

  1. Are you suppose to check-in all these files?
  2. Are they part of your source code?

You can simply use the .gitignore file to avoid unwanted files in the repository. If you are working on more then one repo, it’s easy to use a global .gitignore file (without adding or pushing). And .gitignore file adds clarity and helps you to keep your code clean. What you can commit, and it will automatically ignore the unwanted files like autogenerated files like .dll and .class, etc.

#git basics #git command #git ignore #git best practices #git tutorial for beginners #git tutorials

7 Best Practices in GIT for Your Code Quality
Rupert  Beatty

Rupert Beatty

1617875220

Git Commands You Can Use To Dig Through Your Git History

In this short article, we’ll be exploring some quick  git commands that can help us in digging through our repositories’ history of commits. We’ll look at

  1. git log
  2. git shortlog
  3. git show
  4. git rev-list

#git #git-log #git-commands #git-history #aws

Git Commands You Can Use To Dig Through Your Git History
Nat  Grady

Nat Grady

1619577012

Top 30 Git Commands You Should Know About

If you are a part of a professional  software development setting, you would know how things work when it comes to writing code. There are usually different teams that write code – the development environment could have a team of developers that are sitting in the same location working closely with a team that is collaborating with them remotely from another part of the globe.

Both these teams write their code and contribute to a central codebase. This is where  version control systems or VCSs come into play. They manage codebase that collects code from different sources.

What is a version control system?

A version control system is a single point of reference for the contribution and management of all the stages and releases of a product, and it does this job without the need for having multiple files or folders. VCSs take out the issues that usually arise during the development phase, and streamline the entire process by not making developers trade files or folders.

Developers instead have a single source that they need to communicate with. It is this source that sees all the changes in the code. All the files are saved in this location. We have two types of VCSs that developers make use of around the world depending on their needs. These VCSs are

Centralized version control systems: These VCSs make use of a centralized repository where the project or codebase exists. This centralized project consists of all the files that are contributed by the developers of a team. If any developer wants to make changes to the project or the files stored in it, they need access to enter this repository.

Distributed version control systems: In these VCSs, things are a lot more flexible than their centralized counterparts. Mercurial and Git are the most common examples of distributed VCSs. In this system, every developer has its own local repository that not only has the code written by them and the changes that they made to it over a period of time but also their releases as well as those of other developers.

How does git work?

Git doesn’t work in the same way that most of the other version control systems do. Unlike other VCSs that calculate differences in files and sums these differences up to arrive at the saved version, git uses snapshots of your files system to do the job. Whenever you commit changes to the files or save the changed state of the project, you will have git taking a snapshot of the system and then saving it as a reference.

Files that don’t undergo any change will have their previous snapshot stored as a reference. Git provides developers a string of commands to help them perform different tasks. We will discuss top 30 git commands that are most commonly used by open source developers.

Git commands

All these commands that we will be discussing in this section have a big role to play in making the software development process a lot easier for developers. We will mention the most useful of those commands.

1. Configure details

2. Initialize repositories

3. Add files

4. Verify files that are added

5. Commit repository changes

6. Display logs

7. Verify git branches

8. Reset branches

9. Add new branches

10. Switch between branches

11. Display version

12. Consult manual page

13. Manage git configuration

14. Summarize log info

15. View modifications for each commit

16. Validate object database

17. List unpacked objects

18. Pack objects that aren’t already packed

19. Manage working trees

20. Look for patterns

21. Display remote repositories

22. Push updates

23. Pull new updates

24. Clone repositories

25. Stash working directory

26. Revert existing commits

27. Merge two branches

28. Check differences between files, commits, and tress

29. Add tags to projects

30. Fetch remote data

#full stack development #git #git commands

Top 30 Git Commands You Should Know About