Use Serverless and Twilio to Automate Your Communication Channels

The way people communicate has changed over the last few years. When was the last time you called a service-number because you had a problem? For me, this is already years ago, and I most often use chat interfaces when they’re available.

These new interfaces are usually automated to a certain extent – it’s hard to tell if a human or a machine is replying to your question. Developers have the power to build interfaces that go beyond what we’re used to. Alexa, Whatsapp, emails, SMS – you can automate all these channels.

Twilio is a communications API that enables you to tailor the experience to your needs. Want to do an SMS poll? No problem! Need a custom chatbot on your landing pages? Sure thing! Want to bring all your friends into a group phone call? Easy peasy!

Webhooks – the foundation of future interfaces

As a developer, you probably won’t build the infrastructure to send SMS or make phone calls. You’ll use SDKs and APIs for that. The way it works is that you can use Twilio’s RESTful API to initiate outbound communications. Phone calls, SMS, WhatsApp messages are only one HTTP call away.

The other way around is a little bit trickier. How do you react to incoming messages or phone calls when you’re not controlling the infrastructure receiving these events? Webhooks build the foundation for that.

If someone sends a message, makes a phone call, or uses any other channel a webhook is sent to a URL you define. The response of the webhook controls what happens next.

In the above example, you see the flow for an incoming SMS. A user sends an SMS, Twilio handles this event and makes an HTTP request to your app to find out what to do next.

But do you want to build a whole app to respond to an HTTP request? Or could a serverless function do the job?

#serverless 

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Use Serverless and Twilio to Automate Your Communication Channels
Matt  Towne

Matt Towne

1595437080

How to Use Serverless and Twilio to Automate Communication Channels

The way people communicate has changed over the last few years. When was the last time you called a service-number because you had a problem? For me, this is already years ago, and I most often use chat interfaces when they’re available.

These new interfaces are usually automated to a certain extent – it’s hard to tell if a human or a machine is replying to your question. Developers have the power to build interfaces that go beyond what we’re used to. Alexa, Whatsapp, emails, SMS – you can automate all these channels.

Twilio is a communications API that enables you to tailor the experience to your needs. Want to do an SMS poll? No problem! Need a custom chatbot on your landing pages? Sure thing! Want to bring all your friends into a group phone call? Easy peasy!

Webhooks – the foundation of future interfaces

As a developer, you probably won’t build the infrastructure to send SMS or make phone calls. You’ll use SDKs and APIs for that. The way it works is that you can use Twilio’s RESTful API to initiate outbound communications. Phone calls, SMS, WhatsApp messages are only one HTTP call away.

The other way around is a little bit trickier. How do you react to incoming messages or phone calls when you’re not controlling the infrastructure receiving these events? Webhooks build the foundation for that.

If someone sends a message, makes a phone call, or uses any other channel a webhook is sent to a URL you define. The response of the webhook controls what happens next.

SMS, Twilio, App

In the above example, you see the flow for an incoming SMS. A user sends an SMS, Twilio handles this event and makes an HTTP request to your app to find out what to do next.

But do you want to build a whole app to respond to an HTTP request? Or could a serverless function do the job?

The Serverless Framework now supports deploying Twilio Functions

Serverless functions are a perfect fit for responding to HTTP calls. The Twilio Runtime gives you a way to write serverless functions today. We’re happy to announce that you can now deploy Twilio Functions using the Serverless Framework.

SMS, Twilio, Serverless

If you’re used to working with the Serverless Framework, there is no need to learn a new API. You can continue using the Serverless Framework to control your Twilio communications!

#serverless #twilio

Origin Scale

Origin Scale

1620805745

Automation Management System

Want to try automated inventory management system for small businesses? Originscale automation software automate your data flow across orders, inventory, and purchasing. TRY FOR FREE

#automation #automation software #automated inventory management #automated inventory management system #automation management system #inventory automation

Why Use WordPress? What Can You Do With WordPress?

Can you use WordPress for anything other than blogging? To your surprise, yes. WordPress is more than just a blogging tool, and it has helped thousands of websites and web applications to thrive. The use of WordPress powers around 40% of online projects, and today in our blog, we would visit some amazing uses of WordPress other than blogging.
What Is The Use Of WordPress?

WordPress is the most popular website platform in the world. It is the first choice of businesses that want to set a feature-rich and dynamic Content Management System. So, if you ask what WordPress is used for, the answer is – everything. It is a super-flexible, feature-rich and secure platform that offers everything to build unique websites and applications. Let’s start knowing them:

1. Multiple Websites Under A Single Installation
WordPress Multisite allows you to develop multiple sites from a single WordPress installation. You can download WordPress and start building websites you want to launch under a single server. Literally speaking, you can handle hundreds of sites from one single dashboard, which now needs applause.
It is a highly efficient platform that allows you to easily run several websites under the same login credentials. One of the best things about WordPress is the themes it has to offer. You can simply download them and plugin for various sites and save space on sites without losing their speed.

2. WordPress Social Network
WordPress can be used for high-end projects such as Social Media Network. If you don’t have the money and patience to hire a coder and invest months in building a feature-rich social media site, go for WordPress. It is one of the most amazing uses of WordPress. Its stunning CMS is unbeatable. And you can build sites as good as Facebook or Reddit etc. It can just make the process a lot easier.
To set up a social media network, you would have to download a WordPress Plugin called BuddyPress. It would allow you to connect a community page with ease and would provide all the necessary features of a community or social media. It has direct messaging, activity stream, user groups, extended profiles, and so much more. You just have to download and configure it.
If BuddyPress doesn’t meet all your needs, don’t give up on your dreams. You can try out WP Symposium or PeepSo. There are also several themes you can use to build a social network.

3. Create A Forum For Your Brand’s Community
Communities are very important for your business. They help you stay in constant connection with your users and consumers. And allow you to turn them into a loyal customer base. Meanwhile, there are many good technologies that can be used for building a community page – the good old WordPress is still the best.
It is the best community development technology. If you want to build your online community, you need to consider all the amazing features you get with WordPress. Plugins such as BB Press is an open-source, template-driven PHP/ MySQL forum software. It is very simple and doesn’t hamper the experience of the website.
Other tools such as wpFoRo and Asgaros Forum are equally good for creating a community blog. They are lightweight tools that are easy to manage and integrate with your WordPress site easily. However, there is only one tiny problem; you need to have some technical knowledge to build a WordPress Community blog page.

4. Shortcodes
Since we gave you a problem in the previous section, we would also give you a perfect solution for it. You might not know to code, but you have shortcodes. Shortcodes help you execute functions without having to code. It is an easy way to build an amazing website, add new features, customize plugins easily. They are short lines of code, and rather than memorizing multiple lines; you can have zero technical knowledge and start building a feature-rich website or application.
There are also plugins like Shortcoder, Shortcodes Ultimate, and the Basics available on WordPress that can be used, and you would not even have to remember the shortcodes.

5. Build Online Stores
If you still think about why to use WordPress, use it to build an online store. You can start selling your goods online and start selling. It is an affordable technology that helps you build a feature-rich eCommerce store with WordPress.
WooCommerce is an extension of WordPress and is one of the most used eCommerce solutions. WooCommerce holds a 28% share of the global market and is one of the best ways to set up an online store. It allows you to build user-friendly and professional online stores and has thousands of free and paid extensions. Moreover as an open-source platform, and you don’t have to pay for the license.
Apart from WooCommerce, there are Easy Digital Downloads, iThemes Exchange, Shopify eCommerce plugin, and so much more available.

6. Security Features
WordPress takes security very seriously. It offers tons of external solutions that help you in safeguarding your WordPress site. While there is no way to ensure 100% security, it provides regular updates with security patches and provides several plugins to help with backups, two-factor authorization, and more.
By choosing hosting providers like WP Engine, you can improve the security of the website. It helps in threat detection, manage patching and updates, and internal security audits for the customers, and so much more.

Read More

#use of wordpress #use wordpress for business website #use wordpress for website #what is use of wordpress #why use wordpress #why use wordpress to build a website

Use Serverless and Twilio to Automate Your Communication Channels

The way people communicate has changed over the last few years. When was the last time you called a service-number because you had a problem? For me, this is already years ago, and I most often use chat interfaces when they’re available.

These new interfaces are usually automated to a certain extent – it’s hard to tell if a human or a machine is replying to your question. Developers have the power to build interfaces that go beyond what we’re used to. Alexa, Whatsapp, emails, SMS – you can automate all these channels.

Twilio is a communications API that enables you to tailor the experience to your needs. Want to do an SMS poll? No problem! Need a custom chatbot on your landing pages? Sure thing! Want to bring all your friends into a group phone call? Easy peasy!

Webhooks – the foundation of future interfaces

As a developer, you probably won’t build the infrastructure to send SMS or make phone calls. You’ll use SDKs and APIs for that. The way it works is that you can use Twilio’s RESTful API to initiate outbound communications. Phone calls, SMS, WhatsApp messages are only one HTTP call away.

The other way around is a little bit trickier. How do you react to incoming messages or phone calls when you’re not controlling the infrastructure receiving these events? Webhooks build the foundation for that.

If someone sends a message, makes a phone call, or uses any other channel a webhook is sent to a URL you define. The response of the webhook controls what happens next.

In the above example, you see the flow for an incoming SMS. A user sends an SMS, Twilio handles this event and makes an HTTP request to your app to find out what to do next.

But do you want to build a whole app to respond to an HTTP request? Or could a serverless function do the job?

#serverless 

Mikel  Okuneva

Mikel Okuneva

1596848400

Automation Testing Tips

Thorough testing is crucial to the success of a software product. If your software doesn’t work properly, chances are strong that most people won’t buy or use it…at least not for long. But testing to find defects or bugs is time-consuming, expensive, often repetitive, and subject to human error. Automated testing, in which Quality Assurance teams use software tools to run detailed, repetitive, and data-intensive tests automatically, helps teams improve software quality and make the most of their always-limited testing resources.

Use these top tips to ensure that your software testing is successful and you get the maximum return on investment (ROI):

  1. Decide What Test Cases to Automate
  2. Test Early and Test Often
  3. Select the Right Automated Testing Tool
  4. Divide your Automated Testing Efforts
  5. Create Good, Quality Test Data
  6. Create Automated Tests that are Resistant to Changes in the UI

Decide What Test Cases to Automate

It is impossible to automate all testing, so it is important to determine what test cases should be automated first.

The benefit of automated testing is linked to how many times a given test can be repeated. Tests that are only performed a few times are better left for manual testing. Good test cases for automation are ones that are run frequently and require large amounts of data to perform the same action.

You can get the most benefit out of your automated testing efforts by automating:

  • Repetitive tests that run for multiple builds.
  • Tests that tend to cause human error.
  • Tests that require multiple data sets.
  • Frequently used functionality that introduces high-risk conditions.
  • Tests that are impossible to perform manually.
  • Tests that run on several different hardware or software platforms and configurations.
  • Tests that take a lot of effort and time when manual testing.

Success in test automation requires careful planning and design work. Start out by creating an automation plan. This allows you to identify the initial set of tests to automate and serve as a guide for future tests. First, you should define your goal for automated testing and determine which types of tests to automate. There are a few different types of testing, and each has its place in the testing process. For instance, unit testing is used to test a small part of the intended application. To test a certain piece of the application’s UI, you would use functional or GUI testing.

After determining your goal and which types of tests to automate, you should decide what actions your automated tests will perform. Don’t just create test steps that test various aspects of the application’s behavior at one time. Large, complex automated tests are difficult to edit and debug. It is best to divide your tests into several logical, smaller tests. It makes your test environment more coherent and manageable and allows you to share test code, test data, and processes. You will get more opportunities to update your automated tests just by adding small tests that address new functionality. Test the functionality of your application as you add it, rather than waiting until the whole feature is implemented.

When creating tests, try to keep them small and focused on one objective. For example, separate tests for read-only versus reading/write tests. This allows you to use these individual tests repeatedly without including them in every automated test.

Once you create several simple automated tests, you can group your tests into one, larger automated test. You can organize automated tests by the application’s functional area, major/minor division in the application, common functions, or a base set of test data. If an automated test refers to other tests, you may need to create a test tree, where you can run tests in a specific order.

Test Early and Test Often

To get the most out of your automated testing, testing should be started as early as possible and ran as often as needed. The earlier testers get involved in the life cycle of the project the better, and the more you test, the more bugs you find. Automated unit testing can be implemented on day one and then you can gradually build your automated test suite. Bugs detected early are a lot cheaper to fix than those discovered later in production or deployment.

With the shift left movement, developers and advanced testers are now empowered to build and run tests. Tools allow users to run functional UI tests for web and desktop applications from within their favorite IDEs. With support for Visual Studio and Java IDEs such as IntelliJ and Eclipse, developers never have to leave the comfort of their ecosystem to validate application quality meaning teams can quickly and easily shift left to deliver software faster.

Select the Right Automated Testing Tool

Selecting an automated testing tool is essential for test automation. There are a lot of automated testing tools on the market, and it is important to choose the automated testing tool that best suits your overall requirements.

Consider these key points when selecting an automated testing tool:

  • Support for your platforms and technology. Are you testing .Net, C# or WPF applications and on what operating systems? Are you going to test web applications? Do you need support for mobile application testing? Do you work with Android or iOS, or do you work with both operating systems?
  • Flexibility for testers of all skill levels. Can your QA department write automated test scripts or is there a need for keyword testing?
  • Feature-rich but also easy to create automated tests. Does the automated testing tool support record and playback test creation as well as manual creation of automated tests; does it include features for implementing checkpoints to verify values, databases, or key functionality of your application?
  • Create automated tests that are reusable, maintainable, and resistant to changes in the applications UI. Will my automated tests break if my UI changes?

For detailed information about selecting automated testing tools for automated testing, see Selecting Automated Testing Tools.

Divide Your Automated Testing Efforts

Usually, the creation of different tests is based on QA engineers’ skill levels. It is important to identify the level of experience and skills for each of your team members and divide your automated testing efforts accordingly. For instance, writing automated test scripts requires expert knowledge of scripting languages. Thus, in order to perform these tasks, you should have QA engineers that know the script language provided by the automated testing tool.

Some team members may not be versed in writing automated test scripts. These QA engineers may be better at writing test cases. It is better when an automated testing tool has a way to create automated tests that do not require an in-depth knowledge of scripting languages.

You should also collaborate on your automated testing project with other QA engineers in your department. Testing performed by a team is more effective for finding defects and the right automated testing tool allows you to share your projects with several testers.

Create Good, Quality Test Data

Good test data is extremely useful for data-driven testing. The data that should be entered into input fields during an automated test is usually stored in an external file. This data might be read from a database or any other data source like text or XML files, Excel sheets, and database tables. A good automated testing tool actually understands the contents of the data files and iterates over the contents in the automated test. Using external data makes your automated tests reusable and easier to maintain. To add different testing scenarios, the data files can be easily extended with new data without needing to edit the actual automated test.

Typically, you create test data manually and then save it to the desired data storage. However, you will find tools that provide you with the Data Generator that assists you in creating Table variables and Excel files that store test data. This approach lets you generate data of the desired type (integer numbers, strings, boolean values, and so on) and automatically save this data to the specified variable or file. Using this feature, you decrease the time spent on preparing test data for data-driven tests.

Creating test data for your automated tests is boring, but you should invest time and effort into creating data that is well structured. With good test data available, writing automated tests becomes a lot easier. The earlier you create good-quality data, the easier it is to extend existing automated tests along with the application’s development.

Create Automated Tests That Are Resistant to Changes in the UI

Automated tests created with scripts or keyword tests are dependent on the application under test. The user interface of the application may change between builds, especially in the early stages. These changes may affect the test results, or your automated tests may no longer work with future versions of the application. The problem is automated testing tools use a series of properties to identify and locate an object. Sometimes a testing tool relies on location coordinates to find the object. For instance, if the control caption or its location has changed, the automated test will no longer be able to find the object when it runs and will fail. To run the automated test successfully, you may need to replace old names with new ones in the entire project, before running the test against the new version of the application. However, if you provide unique names for your controls, it makes your automated tests resistant to these UI changes and ensures that your automated tests work without having to make changes to the text itself. This also eliminates the automated testing tool from relying on location coordinates to find the control, which is less stable and breaks easily.

#automation-testing-tool #automation-testing #automation-tips #automation-software #automation