Set Up Vim as Your Rust IDE

Set Up Vim as Your Rust IDE

Want to work with Rust? Here's why Vim is a great IDE for Rust app development and how to set it up.

The Rust programming language is designed to implement systems programming with safe concurrency and high memory performance in a way that feels familiar to C++ developers. It's also one of the most loved programming languages in Stack Overflow's 2019 Developer Survey.

Text editors and integrated development environment (IDE) tools make writing Rust code easier and quicker. There are many editors to choose from, but I believe the Vim editor is a great fit for a Rust IDE. In this article, I'll explain how to set up Vim for Rust application development.

Install Vim

Vim is one of the most commonly used command-line text editors in Linux and Unix. The latest version (as of this writing) is 8.2, and it offers more flexibility than ever in how you can use it.

Vim's download page provides multiple options to install it with binary or packages. For example, if you use macOS, you can install the MacVim project, then expand Vim's capabilities by installing Vim plugins.

To set up Rust for development, download Rustup, a handy Rust installer utility, and run the following in your terminal (if you use macOS, Linux, or any other Unix-like operating system):

$ curl --proto '=https' --tlsv1.2 -sSf https://sh.rustup.rs | sh

Choose an installation option from the interactive prompt. Then you will see output like:

stable installed - rustc 1.43.1 (8d69840ab 2020-05-04)

Rust is installed now. Great!

To get started you need Cargo's bin directory ($HOME/.cargo/bin) in your PATH
environment variable. Next time you log in this will be done
automatically.

To configure your current shell run source $HOME/.cargo/env

rust

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