Researchers: LinkedIn, Instagram Vulnerable to Preview-Link RCE Security Woes

Popular chat apps, including LINE, Slack, Twitter DMs and others, can also leak location data and share private info with third-party servers.

UPDATE

Link previews in popular chat apps on iOS and Android are a firehose of security and privacy issues, researchers have found. At risk are Facebook Messenger, LINE, Slack, Twitter Direct Messages, Zoom and many others. In the case of Instagram and LinkedIn, it’s even possible to execute remote code on the companies’ servers through the feature, according to an analysis.

Link previews are standard in most chat apps, and they can be very useful. When a user sends a link through, it renders a short summary and a preview image in-line in the chat, so other users don’t have to click the link to see what it points to.

Unfortunately, there’s a downside. According to independent researchers Talal Haj Bakry and Tommy Mysk, the feature can leak IP addresses, expose links sent in end-to-end encrypted chats and has been caught “unnecessarily downloading gigabytes of data quietly in the background.”

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Researchers: LinkedIn, Instagram Vulnerable to Preview-Link RCE Security Woes
Wilford  Pagac

Wilford Pagac

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Best Custom Web & Mobile App Development Company

Everything around us has become smart, like smart infrastructures, smart cities, autonomous vehicles, to name a few. The innovation of smart devices makes it possible to achieve these heights in science and technology. But, data is vulnerable, there is a risk of attack by cybercriminals. To get started, let’s know about IoT devices.

What are IoT devices?

The Internet Of Things(IoT) is a system that interrelates computer devices like sensors, software, and actuators, digital machines, etc. They are linked together with particular objects that work through the internet and transfer data over devices without humans interference.

Famous examples are Amazon Alexa, Apple SIRI, Interconnected baby monitors, video doorbells, and smart thermostats.

How could your IoT devices be vulnerable?

When technologies grow and evolve, risks are also on the high stakes. Ransomware attacks are on the continuous increase; securing data has become the top priority.

When you think your smart home won’t fudge a thing against cybercriminals, you should also know that they are vulnerable. When cybercriminals access our smart voice speakers like Amazon Alexa or Apple Siri, it becomes easy for them to steal your data.

Cybersecurity report 2020 says popular hacking forums expose 770 million email addresses and 21 million unique passwords, 620 million accounts have been compromised from 16 hacked websites.

The attacks are likely to increase every year. To help you secure your data of IoT devices, here are some best tips you can implement.

Tips to secure your IoT devices

1. Change Default Router Name

Your router has the default name of make and model. When we stick with the manufacturer name, attackers can quickly identify our make and model. So give the router name different from your addresses, without giving away personal information.

2. Know your connected network and connected devices

If your devices are connected to the internet, these connections are vulnerable to cyber attacks when your devices don’t have the proper security. Almost every web interface is equipped with multiple devices, so it’s hard to track the device. But, it’s crucial to stay aware of them.

3. Change default usernames and passwords

When we use the default usernames and passwords, it is attackable. Because the cybercriminals possibly know the default passwords come with IoT devices. So use strong passwords to access our IoT devices.

4. Manage strong, Unique passwords for your IoT devices and accounts

Use strong or unique passwords that are easily assumed, such as ‘123456’ or ‘password1234’ to protect your accounts. Give strong and complex passwords formed by combinations of alphabets, numeric, and not easily bypassed symbols.

Also, change passwords for multiple accounts and change them regularly to avoid attacks. We can also set several attempts to wrong passwords to set locking the account to safeguard from the hackers.

5. Do not use Public WI-FI Networks

Are you try to keep an eye on your IoT devices through your mobile devices in different locations. I recommend you not to use the public WI-FI network to access them. Because they are easily accessible through for everyone, you are still in a hurry to access, use VPN that gives them protection against cyber-attacks, giving them privacy and security features, for example, using Express VPN.

6. Establish firewalls to discover the vulnerabilities

There are software and firewalls like intrusion detection system/intrusion prevention system in the market. This will be useful to screen and analyze the wire traffic of a network. You can identify the security weakness by the firewall scanners within the network structure. Use these firewalls to get rid of unwanted security issues and vulnerabilities.

7. Reconfigure your device settings

Every smart device comes with the insecure default settings, and sometimes we are not able to change these default settings configurations. These conditions need to be assessed and need to reconfigure the default settings.

8. Authenticate the IoT applications

Nowadays, every smart app offers authentication to secure the accounts. There are many types of authentication methods like single-factor authentication, two-step authentication, and multi-factor authentication. Use any one of these to send a one time password (OTP) to verify the user who logs in the smart device to keep our accounts from falling into the wrong hands.

9. Update the device software up to date

Every smart device manufacturer releases updates to fix bugs in their software. These security patches help us to improve our protection of the device. Also, update the software on the smartphone, which we are used to monitoring the IoT devices to avoid vulnerabilities.

10. Track the smartphones and keep them safe

When we connect the smart home to the smartphone and control them via smartphone, you need to keep them safe. If you miss the phone almost, every personal information is at risk to the cybercriminals. But sometimes it happens by accident, makes sure that you can clear all the data remotely.

However, securing smart devices is essential in the world of data. There are still cybercriminals bypassing the securities. So make sure to do the safety measures to avoid our accounts falling out into the wrong hands. I hope these steps will help you all to secure your IoT devices.

If you have any, feel free to share them in the comments! I’d love to know them.

Are you looking for more? Subscribe to weekly newsletters that can help your stay updated IoT application developments.

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Critical SonicWall VPN Portal Bug Allows DoS, Worming RCE

A critical security bug in the SonicWall VPN portal can be used to crash the device and prevent users from connecting to corporate resources. It could also open the door to remote code execution (RCE), researchers said.

The flaw (CVE-2020-5135) is a stack-based buffer overflow in the SonicWall Network Security Appliance (NSA). According to researchers who discovered it, the flaw exists within the HTTP/HTTPS service used for product management and SSL VPN remote access.

An unskilled attacker could trigger a persistent denial-of-service condition using an unauthenticated HTTP request involving a custom protocol handler, wrote Craig Young, a computer security researcher with Tripwire’s Vulnerability and Exposures Research Team (VERT), in a Tuesday analysis. But the damage could go further.

VPN bugs are tremendously dangerous for a bunch of reasons,” he told Threatpost. “These systems expose entry points into sensitive networks and there is very little in the way of security introspection tools for system admins to recognize when a breach has occurred. Attackers can breach a VPN and then spend months mapping out a target network before deploying ransomware or making extortion demands.”

Adding insult to injury, this particular flaw exists in a pre-authentication routine, and within a component (SSL VPN) which is typically exposed to the public internet.

“The most notable aspect of this vulnerability is that the VPN portal can be exploited without knowing a username or password,” Young told Threatpost. “It is trivial to force a system to reboot…An attacker can simply send crafted requests to the SonicWALL HTTP(S) service and trigger memory corruption.”

However, he added that a code-execution attack does require a bit more work.

“Tripwire VERT has also confirmed the ability to divert execution flow through stack corruption, indicating that a code-execution exploit is likely feasible,” he wrote, adding in an interview that an attacker would need to also leverage an information leak and a bit of analysis to pull it off.

That said, “If someone takes the time to prepare RCE payloads, they could likely create a sizeable botnet through a worm,” he said.

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Houston  Sipes

Houston Sipes

1602781200

Grindr's Bug Bounty Pledge Doesn't Translate to Security

SAS@Home 2020– After a Grindr security flaw was disclosed this week, the dating site promised it would launch a bug-bounty program in an effort to “[keep its] service secure.” But Katie Moussouris, CEO of Luta Security and a bug bounty program expert, warned at this week’s SAS@home virtual event that simply launching a bug-bounty program won’t result in better security.

The Grindr bug, which allowed attackers to launch password resets without accessing a user’s email inbox, made news headlines as it was extremely trivial to exploit. Speaking during a Tuesday virtual session, Moussouris said that if organizations have that level of “low-hanging fruit” when it comes to vulnerabilities, bug-bounty programs can sometimes pose more problems than they solve.

“We have a lot of hope for bug-bounty programs, but they’re not the ‘easy button’ we thought they were,” she said, speaking on Tuesday at SAS@Home, which is Kaspersky’s virtual Security Analyst Summit conference.

Grindr isn’t alone – many companies are looking to adopt, or have already adopted, bug-bounty programs or vulnerability-disclosure programs (VDPs). It’s important to distinguish the two: A bug-bounty program offers cash rewards for finding flaws (which in theory should then be fixed by the organization), while a VDP covers when a vulnerability is reported by a third party to an organization. Ideally, those involved would follow the ISO standards for vulnerability disclosure (ISO 29147) and vulnerability handling (ISO 30111) processes.

Katie Moussouris talks about the separate definitions of VDPs, bug-bounty programs and pentesting during SAS@Home.

But companies are rushing in to adopt bug-bounty programs and VDPs without first fleshing out important issues — whether that’s defining what’s in scope, looking at how an organization can handle an influx of vulnerabilities being reported, or properly training triage teams.

In December, for instance, a CISA directive was proposed that would require all U.S. agencies to develop and implement vulnerability disclosure processes for their internet-connected systems. While CISA recommended that agencies consider guidance around what’s in-scope and who to contact, Moussouris noted that holes remained in terms of setting up the back-end processes to receive reports, or gaining the resources that are necessary to fix the bugs reported.

#government #hacks #security analyst summit #vulnerabilities #web security #bounty hunter #bug bounty #bugcrowd #cisa #grindr #hackerone #katie moussouris #luta security #pentesting #security vulnerability #vdp #vulnerability disclosure program #zoom

Ron  Cartwright

Ron Cartwright

1603018800

October Patch Tuesday: Microsoft Patches Critical, Wormable RCE Bug

Microsoft has pushed out fixes for 87 security vulnerabilities in October – 11 of them critical – and one of those is potentially wormable.

There are also six bugs that were previously unpatched but publicly disclosed, which could give cybercriminals a leg up — and in fact at least one public exploit is already circulating for this group.

This month’s Patch Tuesday overall includes fixes for bugs in Microsoft Windows, Office and Office Services and Web Apps, Azure Functions, Open Source Software, Exchange Server, Visual Studio, .NET Framework, Microsoft Dynamics, and the Windows Codecs Library.

A full 75 are listed as important, and just one is listed as moderate in severity. None are listed as being under active attack, but the group does include six issues that were known but unpatched before this month’s regularly scheduled updates.

“As usual, whenever possible, it’s better to prioritize updates against the Windows operating system,” Richard Tsang, senior software engineer at Rapid7, told Threatpost. “Coming in at 53 of the 87 vulnerabilities, patching the OS knocks out 60 percent of the vulnerabilities listed, along with over half of the critical RCE vulnerabilities resolved today.”

11 Critical Bugs

One of the most notable critical bugs, according to researchers, is a remote code-execution (RCE) problem in the TCP/IP stack. That issue (CVE-2020-16898) allows attackers to execute arbitrary code with elevated privileges using a specially crafted ICMPv6 router advertisement.

Microsoft gives this bug its highest exploitability rating, meaning attacks in the wild are extremely likely – and as such, it carries a severity rating of 9.8 out of 10 on the CvSS vulnerability scale. True to the season, it could be an administrator’s horror show.

“If you’re running an IPv6 network, you know that filtering router advertisements is not a practical workaround,” said Dustin Childs, researcher at Trend Micro’s Zero-Day Initiative (ZDI), in his Patch Tuesday analysis. “You should definitely test and deploy this patch as soon as possible.”

Bharat Jogi, senior manager of vulnerability and threat research at Qualys, said that an exploit for the bug could be self-propagating, worming through infrastructure without user interaction.

“An attacker can exploit this vulnerability without any authentication, and it is potentially wormable,” he said. “We expect a proof-of-concept (PoC) for this exploit would be dropped soon, and we highly encourage everyone to fix this vulnerability as soon as possible.”

Threatpost has reached out for more technical details on the wormable aspect of the bug.

#cloud security #vulnerabilities #web security #critical #cve-2020-16898 #microsoft #october 2020 #patch tuesday #patches #publicly disclosed #remote code execution #router advertisements #security bug #security vulnerabilities #tcp/ip #unpatched bugs #wormable

Marcus Anthony

1613539912

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