React 18 Version: What’s New!

React 17, which was introduced in late 2020, failed to bring lots of innovative features. Rather, it emphasized enhancing the basics plus laying the foundation for future updates. All these were done to enable smooth, gradual adoption of what is going to come next.

This is how we get introduced to React 18. The plan for the subsequent version of React was announced by the React team recently, along with many upcoming features. Likewise, there was a publicly available alpha, release timeline, plus a Working Group committed to enhancing React 18.

Lots of things are happening with React at present, and therefore, let us take a look at all the declarations and some other details.

React 18 Working Group

Before diving into the remarkable new features, it is essential to talk about the React 18 WG (Working Group) since this type of concept has been used for the first time in the development of React.

The group’s objective is to offer feedback and make the broader ecosystem ready for the forthcoming release of React. Although it is restricted to selected members, it will be feasible for you to always check it out since the conversation is hosted through GitHub Discussions and made publicly available as well.

You will be able to come across different concepts, research findings, and feature overviews from the React team without any problem.

React 18 Working Group happens to be the first such attempt for involving the ecosystem and community builders more in the creative procedure behind the subsequent release of React.

How is it going to influence the result? We need to wait and watch.

React 18: Innovative Features

As compared to the earlier version, it seems that React 18 is packed with innovative features. While some are remarkable enhancements, others shine new light on the concurrent model of React. In any case, there is plenty to unpack, with many more coming down the road!

Automatic Batching

There are massive enhancements to automatic batching when it comes to performance.

Before the introduction of React 18, multiple state updates were already batched by React into one for reducing unwanted re-renders. Nevertheless, it took place in DOM event handlers only, and therefore, timeouts, Promises, or other handlers did not use it to their advantage.

const App = () => {

const [firstCount, setFirstCount] = useState(0);

const [secondCount, setSecondCount] = useState(0);

const handleClick = () => {

setFirstCount((count) => count + 1); // No re-render yet

setSecondCount((count) => count + 0.5); // No re-render yet

// Re-render (updates batched)

};

/*

const alternativeHandleClick = () => {

Promise.resolve().then(() => {

  setFirstCount((count) => count + 1); // Re-render

  setSecondCount((count) => count + 0.5); // Re-render

});

};

*/

return (

<div>

  <button onClick={handleClick}>Next</button>

  <span

    style={{

      color: firstCount % 2 === 0 ? "blue" : "black",

    }}

  >

    {secondCount}

  </span>

</div>

);

};

With the introduction of version 18, React will batch state updates irrespective of where they take place, so long as it is risk-free to do. This leads to superior performance without any extra involvement.

Strict Mode Changes

Next, we will mention several additions to the Strict Mode, which includes new behavior named “strict effects.” This will be double-invoking effects, particularly mount as well as unmounts ones.

The extra checks are here for testing against several mount/unmounts cycles. Apart from ensuring more resilient components, it likewise corrects behavior at the time of development with Fast Refresh (when components are mounted or unmounted) plus an innovative “Offscreen API,” which is presently in the works.

Better performance will be enabled by Offscreen API by concealing components rather than unmounting them, maintaining the state, and still calling the effects of mount/unmount. This will play an important role in optimizing components such as virtualized lists, tabs, and so on.

Root API

The render function, which was available at the beginning of every React app, will be swapped by createRoot.

This new API happens to be the gateway for accessing new features of React 18. Moreover, it is provided together with legacy API for encouraging gradual adoption and ease-out prospective performance comparisons.

New root API is likewise somewhat different syntax-wise.

import ReactDOM from “react-dom”;

import App from “App”;

const container = document.getElementById(“app”);

// Old

ReactDOM.render(, container);

// New

const root = ReactDOM.createRoot(container);

root.render();

It is evident to you how your React app’s root is now separate. Being a data structure pointer connected to a DOM element, the root had been opaque to the render function’s user previously.

It is imperative to create the root using the createRoot function and call the render method on it after this. Apart from enabling new features, it is likewise simpler and clearer to update when needed.

The new API likewise modifies the way hydrate functions and render callback work. The callback argument has been removed completely since it is difficult to time it properly. Rather, you ought to use, e.g., ref callback or timeout on the root.

// …

// Old

ReactDOM.render(, container, () => console.log(“renderered”));

// New

const App = ({ callback }) => {

return (

<div ref={callback}>

  <h1>Hello World</h1>

</div>

);

}

const root = ReactDOM.createRoot(container);

root.render(<App callback={() => console.log(“renderered”)} />);

As for hydrate, it transforms into a config option from a separate function, making it more sensible.

// …

// Old

ReactDOM.hydrate(, container);

// New

const root = ReactDOM.createRoot(container, { hydrate: true });

root.render();

Concurrent Rendering

There is no doubt that the most significant update for React 18 is available with the “concurrent mode” or “concurrent rendering,” as it is now called.

The naming alteration is essential given that it helps the adoption of concurrent features to be enabled gradually. This will enable you to adopt concurrent features seamlessly without rewrites at your convenience.

New APIs

New APIs are available with new features. However, all of these happen to be opt-in and cover things such as Suspense updates, state transitions, plus new hooks when it comes to concurrent rendering.

startTransition

A new API has been introduced by React 18 for handling heavy state updates such as list filtering or data fetches. In such cases, setting the state simply will trigger updates immediately, probably slowing down the UI.

For combating this, you will come across an innovative API as startTransition function. It will be marking state updates as transitions, making it non-urgent to handle them.

import { startTransition } from “react”;

// …

// Urgent -> show updated input

setInputValue(input);

// Transition (non-urgent) -> show search

startTransition(() => {

setSearchQuery(input);

});

startTransition will come of use when you want to keep native user input snappy as you perform non-urgent and complicated operations in the background. If the user updates the search query, that will be reflected by the input field instantly, while the earlier transaction will be canceled.

Besides startTransition, an innovative useTransition will offer info regarding whether or not the given transition is pending. It will also enable you to set an extra timeout as well.

// …

const App = () => {

// …

const [isPending, startTransition] = useTransition({ timeoutMs: 2000 });

startTransition(() => {

setSearchQuery(input);

});

// …

return (

<span>

  {isPending ? " Loading..." : null}

  {/* ... */}

</span>

);

};

// …

This information can be used by you for render loading UIs, implementing custom handling, and so forth.

useDeferredValue

The innovative useDeferredValue hook is available to us while continuing the trend of accepting value changes.

import { useDeferredValue } from “react”;

// …

const [text, setText] = useState(“text”);

const deferredText = useDeferredValue(text, { timeoutMs: 2000 });

// …

A deferred version of the accepted value will be returned by the hook that will “lag” the original one. Although it is similar, it is somewhat different from the already mentioned transitions. Nevertheless, it is useful when you have to implement complicated state-based deferred behaviors.

SuspenseList

Ultimately, you will come across the new component, which helps to organize the order in which the directly-nested and components become revealed. In addition, this component handles cases where fetched data can arrive in random order. Because of , it is possible to keep it orchestrated while keeping the UI in check.

import { Suspense, SuspenseList } from “react”;

const App = () => {

return (

<SuspenseList revealOrder="forwards">

  <Suspense fallback={"Loading..."}>

    <ProfilePicture id={1} />

  </Suspense>

  <Suspense fallback={"Loading..."}>

    <ProfilePicture id={2} />

  </Suspense>

  <Suspense fallback={"Loading..."}>

    <ProfilePicture id={3} />

  </Suspense>

</SuspenseList>

);

};

// …

You will find more information, such as adjusting behavior with its props in the WIP (Work-In-Progress) documentation.

Suspense Improvements

In combination with and other concurrent rendering updates, several enhancements have been made to the general Suspense behavior.

The most significant advancement of Suspense is turning out to be a stable feature finally with massive architectural alterations under the hood along with an innovative name – “Concurrent Suspense.” Nevertheless, the terminology is used mostly for differentiating the feature versions when it comes to migration since the user-facing modifications are minimal.

The most noteworthy user-facing change is needed to render the suspended siblings of the component.

// …

const App = () => {

return (

<Suspense fallback={<Loading />}>

  <SuspendedComponent />

  <Sibling />

</Suspense>

);

};

// …

The above code, in React 17, both lead to being mounted instantaneously plus its effects called, only to be concealed soon after.

This has been fixed by React 18 by not mounting the component whatsoever and first waiting for to be resolved. Although this helps fix some problems regarding libraries in React ecosystem, you should not observe that much.

Let’s know more here new features of React 18: https://www.rlogical.com/blog/react-18-version-whats-new/

#react #react-native #javascript #api

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Buddha Community

React 18 Version: What’s New!
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Which is the best React Native app development company in New York?

React Native, an open-source JavaScript mobile app dynamic framework that provides the opportunity for Android and iOS users to download and use your product.

In this digital era, all users require prompt information and most of the businesses want to give a better mobile app experience to their users. There are multiple mobile app development frameworks available and React Native is the best one of that.

Advantages of React Native Mobile App Development:

  • A mobile app can be developed with the help of Web technology which enables any web developer to easily enhance their skills and create React apps.
  • React Native supports in building cross-platform mobile apps.
  • It saves time and cost to develop mobile apps on many platforms.
  • Building blocks that are used in iOS and Android apps are also used while building React Native based apps which means that React Native is a mobile framework that compiles app components for native mobile applications in JavaScript.
  • A React Native app ensures speed and agility for the mobile apps with responsiveness and a great native app-based user experience.

Best React Native App Development Company in New York:

AppClues Infotech is the Best React Native Mobile App Development Company in New York that focus on delivering a feature-rich mobile app. Since established in 2014, they have successfully delivered 750+ mobile app development projects to their esteemed clients. They are developing a robust and high-quality mobile app using the latest methodology.

They have the best dedicated React native mobile app developers team who has high experience and the greatest strength of developing any types of React Native App Development. They are the one-stop solution for your any type of React Native App project.

React Native App Development Services by AppClues Infotech

  • Cross-Platform Development
  • MVP
  • Server-Side APIs
  • App Integration
  • User Preferences
  • Reusable Components

Easy Steps for Hiring Dedicated React Native App Developers from AppClues Infotech:

  1. Post Your Project Requirements

  2. Discuss Project Details

  3. Choose The Right Developers

  4. Get Started

Why Choose AppClues Infotech for React Native App Development?

  • Best Designer & Developers Team
  • Quality Assurance
  • Client Satisfaction
  • On-Time Delivery
  • Multiple Service at 0ne-Stop
  • Support & Maintenance
  • Competitive Price

Businesses have started considering React Native development for developing cross-platform mobile apps, as the platform offers many advantages which also include considerable cost and time savings. Additionally, it is an Open Source platform that also allows the integration of third-party plugins. I found this company based on so many hard research like top websites like IT Firms, Good Firms, Clutch, Glassdoor & many more. This company provides an excellent solution for the React Native app development. I hope this company extremely helpful for your future dream mobile app projects.

Discuss your app idea with AppClues Infotech Team or get a free quote from them.

#react native app development new york #react native mobile app development new york #top react native app development company new york #best react native app development services new york #custom react native app development company new york

Mike  Kozey

Mike Kozey

1656151740

Test_cov_console: Flutter Console Coverage Test

Flutter Console Coverage Test

This small dart tools is used to generate Flutter Coverage Test report to console

How to install

Add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dev_dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

How to run

run the following command to make sure all flutter library is up-to-date

flutter pub get
Running "flutter pub get" in coverage...                            0.5s

run the following command to generate lcov.info on coverage directory

flutter test --coverage
00:02 +1: All tests passed!

run the tool to generate report from lcov.info

flutter pub run test_cov_console
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
 print_cov_constants.dart                    |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Optional parameter

If not given a FILE, "coverage/lcov.info" will be used.
-f, --file=<FILE>                      The target lcov.info file to be reported
-e, --exclude=<STRING1,STRING2,...>    A list of contains string for files without unit testing
                                       to be excluded from report
-l, --line                             It will print Lines & Uncovered Lines only
                                       Branch & Functions coverage percentage will not be printed
-i, --ignore                           It will not print any file without unit testing
-m, --multi                            Report from multiple lcov.info files
-c, --csv                              Output to CSV file
-o, --output=<CSV-FILE>                Full path of output CSV file
                                       If not given, "coverage/test_cov_console.csv" will be used
-t, --total                            Print only the total coverage
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-p, --pass=<MINIMUM>                   Print only the whether total coverage is passed MINIMUM value or not
                                       If the value >= MINIMUM, it will print PASSED, otherwise FAILED
                                       Note: it will ignore all other option (if any), except -m
-h, --help                             Show this help

example run the tool with parameters

flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

report for multiple lcov.info files (-m, --multi)

It support to run for multiple lcov.info files with the followings directory structures:
1. No root module
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
2. With root module
<root>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/lib/src
<root>/<module_a>
<root>/<module_a>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_a>/lib/src
<root>/<module_b>
<root>/<module_b>/coverage/lcov.info
<root>/<module_b>/lib/src
...
You must run test_cov_console on <root> dir, and the report would be grouped by module, here is
the sample output for directory structure 'with root module':
flutter pub run test_cov_console --file=coverage/lcov.info --exclude=_constants,_mock --multi
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File                                         |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_a -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
File - module_b -                            |% Branch | % Funcs | % Lines | Uncovered Line #s |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
lib/src/                                     |         |         |         |                   |
 print_cov.dart                              |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |...,149,205,206,207|
lib/                                         |         |         |         |                   |
 test_cov_console.dart                       |    0.00 |    0.00 |    0.00 |    no unit testing|
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|
 All files with unit testing                 |  100.00 |  100.00 |   88.37 |                   |
---------------------------------------------|---------|---------|---------|-------------------|

Output to CSV file (-c, --csv, -o, --output)

flutter pub run test_cov_console -c --output=coverage/test_coverage.csv

#### sample CSV output file:
File,% Branch,% Funcs,% Lines,Uncovered Line #s
lib/,,,,
test_cov_console.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
lib/src/,,,,
parser.dart,100.00,100.00,97.22,"97"
parser_constants.dart,100.00,100.00,100.00,""
print_cov.dart,100.00,100.00,82.91,"29,49,51,52,171,174,177,180,183,184,185,186,187,188,279,324,325,387,388,389,390,391,392,393,394,395,398"
print_cov_constants.dart,0.00,0.00,0.00,no unit testing
All files with unit testing,100.00,100.00,86.07,""

Installing

Use this package as an executable

Install it

You can install the package from the command line:

dart pub global activate test_cov_console

Use it

The package has the following executables:

$ test_cov_console

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Dart:

 $ dart pub add test_cov_console

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add test_cov_console

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit dart pub get):

dependencies:
  test_cov_console: ^0.2.2

Alternatively, your editor might support dart pub get or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:test_cov_console/test_cov_console.dart';

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:flutter/material.dart';

void main() {
  runApp(MyApp());
}

class MyApp extends StatelessWidget {
  // This widget is the root of your application.
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      title: 'Flutter Demo',
      theme: ThemeData(
        // This is the theme of your application.
        //
        // Try running your application with "flutter run". You'll see the
        // application has a blue toolbar. Then, without quitting the app, try
        // changing the primarySwatch below to Colors.green and then invoke
        // "hot reload" (press "r" in the console where you ran "flutter run",
        // or simply save your changes to "hot reload" in a Flutter IDE).
        // Notice that the counter didn't reset back to zero; the application
        // is not restarted.
        primarySwatch: Colors.blue,
        // This makes the visual density adapt to the platform that you run
        // the app on. For desktop platforms, the controls will be smaller and
        // closer together (more dense) than on mobile platforms.
        visualDensity: VisualDensity.adaptivePlatformDensity,
      ),
      home: MyHomePage(title: 'Flutter Demo Home Page'),
    );
  }
}

class MyHomePage extends StatefulWidget {
  MyHomePage({Key? key, required this.title}) : super(key: key);

  // This widget is the home page of your application. It is stateful, meaning
  // that it has a State object (defined below) that contains fields that affect
  // how it looks.

  // This class is the configuration for the state. It holds the values (in this
  // case the title) provided by the parent (in this case the App widget) and
  // used by the build method of the State. Fields in a Widget subclass are
  // always marked "final".

  final String title;

  @override
  _MyHomePageState createState() => _MyHomePageState();
}

class _MyHomePageState extends State<MyHomePage> {
  int _counter = 0;

  void _incrementCounter() {
    setState(() {
      // This call to setState tells the Flutter framework that something has
      // changed in this State, which causes it to rerun the build method below
      // so that the display can reflect the updated values. If we changed
      // _counter without calling setState(), then the build method would not be
      // called again, and so nothing would appear to happen.
      _counter++;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    // This method is rerun every time setState is called, for instance as done
    // by the _incrementCounter method above.
    //
    // The Flutter framework has been optimized to make rerunning build methods
    // fast, so that you can just rebuild anything that needs updating rather
    // than having to individually change instances of widgets.
    return Scaffold(
      appBar: AppBar(
        // Here we take the value from the MyHomePage object that was created by
        // the App.build method, and use it to set our appbar title.
        title: Text(widget.title),
      ),
      body: Center(
        // Center is a layout widget. It takes a single child and positions it
        // in the middle of the parent.
        child: Column(
          // Column is also a layout widget. It takes a list of children and
          // arranges them vertically. By default, it sizes itself to fit its
          // children horizontally, and tries to be as tall as its parent.
          //
          // Invoke "debug painting" (press "p" in the console, choose the
          // "Toggle Debug Paint" action from the Flutter Inspector in Android
          // Studio, or the "Toggle Debug Paint" command in Visual Studio Code)
          // to see the wireframe for each widget.
          //
          // Column has various properties to control how it sizes itself and
          // how it positions its children. Here we use mainAxisAlignment to
          // center the children vertically; the main axis here is the vertical
          // axis because Columns are vertical (the cross axis would be
          // horizontal).
          mainAxisAlignment: MainAxisAlignment.center,
          children: <Widget>[
            Text(
              'You have pushed the button this many times:',
            ),
            Text(
              '$_counter',
              style: Theme.of(context).textTheme.headline4,
            ),
          ],
        ),
      ),
      floatingActionButton: FloatingActionButton(
        onPressed: _incrementCounter,
        tooltip: 'Increment',
        child: Icon(Icons.add),
      ), // This trailing comma makes auto-formatting nicer for build methods.
    );
  }
}

Author: DigitalKatalis
Source Code: https://github.com/DigitalKatalis/test_cov_console 
License: BSD-3-Clause license

#flutter #dart #test 

Top React Native Mobile App Development Companies in USA

Are you looking for the Top React Native Mobile App Development Companies in USA? We at, AppClues Infotech is Leading React Native App Development Company in USA that builds an outstanding, creative & superior mobile app at an affordable price. Our React Native Experts provide you a complete solution and deliver you a high-quality react native app with the latest features.

Our React Native App Development Services:

• Cross-Platform Development
• MVP
• Server-Side APIs
• App Integration
• User Preferences
• Reusable Components

For more info:
Call: +1-978-309-9910
Email: info@appcluesinfotech.com

#react native app development new york #react native mobile app development new york #top react native app development company new york #best react native app development services new york #custom react native app development company new york

Aria Barnes

Aria Barnes

1627031571

React 18: Things You Need To Know About React JS Latest Version

The most awaited version of React 18 is finally out now. Its team has finally revealed the alpha version of React 18 and its plan, though the official launch is still pending. This time the team has tried something and released the plan first to know their user feedback because the last version of React 17 was not that much appreciated among developers.

According to Front-end Frameworks SurveyReact JS has ranked top in the list of most loved frameworks. Thus, the developer communities expect a bit higher from the framework, so they are less appreciative of the previous launch.
ReactJS stats.pngSo, this time React 18 will be a blast. For beginners, the team is working on a new approach. They have called a panel of experts, library authors, educators, and developers to take part in a working group. Initially, it will be a small group.

I am not a part of this release but following the team on their GitHub discussion group. After gathering the information from there, I can say that they have planned much better this time.

React 17 was not able to meet the developer's community. The focus was all primarily centered on making it easier to upgrade React itself. React 18 release will be the opposite. It has a lot of features for react developers.

Read more here: React 18: Things You Need To Know About React JS Latest Version

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