Gordon  Taylor

Gordon Taylor

1657143060

Level-cowdown: Copy-on-write Leveldown

level-cowdown

copy-on-write leveldown

example

We can make a lazy copy of the src database as the copy db:

var cow = require('level-cowdown');
var levelup = require('levelup');
var memdb = require('memdb');

var src = memdb({ valueEncoding: 'json' });
src.batch([
    { type: 'put', key: 'a', value: 100 },
    { type: 'put', key: 'b', value: 555 },
    { type: 'put', key: 'c', value: 300 },
], ready);

function ready () {
    var copy = levelup('fake', {
        db: function () { return cow(src, memdb()) },
        valueEncoding: 'json'
    });
    copy.get('a', function (err, value) {
        console.log('a:copy=', value);
    });
    copy.put('b', 5000, function (err) {
        src.get('b', function (err, value) {
            console.log('b:src=', value);
        });
        copy.get('b', function (err, value) {
            console.log('b:copy=', value);
        });
    });
}

output:

b:src= 555
a:copy= 100
b:copy= 5000

api

var cow = require('level-cowdown')

var copy = cow(originaldb, newdb)

Lazily make a copy of originaldb, storing data in newdb.

Returns a leveldown copy.

Note that if you modify originaldb, you will see those modifications in newdb unless newdb has operations on the same key.

install

With npm do:

npm install level-cowdown

Author: Substack
Source Code: https://github.com/substack/level-cowdown
License: View license

#javascript #write 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Level-cowdown: Copy-on-write Leveldown
Gordon  Taylor

Gordon Taylor

1657143060

Level-cowdown: Copy-on-write Leveldown

level-cowdown

copy-on-write leveldown

example

We can make a lazy copy of the src database as the copy db:

var cow = require('level-cowdown');
var levelup = require('levelup');
var memdb = require('memdb');

var src = memdb({ valueEncoding: 'json' });
src.batch([
    { type: 'put', key: 'a', value: 100 },
    { type: 'put', key: 'b', value: 555 },
    { type: 'put', key: 'c', value: 300 },
], ready);

function ready () {
    var copy = levelup('fake', {
        db: function () { return cow(src, memdb()) },
        valueEncoding: 'json'
    });
    copy.get('a', function (err, value) {
        console.log('a:copy=', value);
    });
    copy.put('b', 5000, function (err) {
        src.get('b', function (err, value) {
            console.log('b:src=', value);
        });
        copy.get('b', function (err, value) {
            console.log('b:copy=', value);
        });
    });
}

output:

b:src= 555
a:copy= 100
b:copy= 5000

api

var cow = require('level-cowdown')

var copy = cow(originaldb, newdb)

Lazily make a copy of originaldb, storing data in newdb.

Returns a leveldown copy.

Note that if you modify originaldb, you will see those modifications in newdb unless newdb has operations on the same key.

install

With npm do:

npm install level-cowdown

Author: Substack
Source Code: https://github.com/substack/level-cowdown
License: View license

#javascript #write 

What You Can Learn about Setting from Classic Sitcoms

Giving your novel a strong sense of place is vital to doing your part to engage the readers without confusing or frustrating them. Setting is a big part of this (though not the whole enchilada — there is also social context and historic period), and I often find writing students and consulting clients erring on one of two extremes.

**Either: **Every scene is set in a different, elaborately-described place from the last. This leads to confusion (and possibly exhaustion and impatience) for the reader, because they have no sense of what they need to actually pay attention to for later and what’s just…there. Are the details of that forest in chapter 2 important? Will I ever be back in this castle again? Is there a reason for this character to be in this particular room versus the one she was in the last time I saw her? Who knows!

Or: There are few or no clues at all as to where the characters are in a scene. What’s in the room? Are they even in a room? Are there other people in th — ope, yes, there are, someone just materialized, what is happening? This all leads to the dreaded “brains in jars” syndrome. That is, characters are only their thoughts and words, with no grounding in the space-time continuum. No one seems to be in a place, in a body, at a time of day.

Everything aspect of writing a novel comes with its difficulties, and there are a lot of moving pieces to manage and deploy in the right balance. When you’re a newer writer, especially, there’s something to be said for keeping things simple until you have a handle on how to manage the arc and scope of a novel-length work. And whether you tend to overdo settings or underdo them, you can learn something from TV, especially classic sitcoms.

Your basic “live studio audience” sitcoms are performed and filmed on sets built inside studios vs. on location. This helps keep production expenses in check and helps the viewer feel at home — there’s a reliable and familiar container to hold the story of any given episode. The writers on the show don’t have to reinvent the wheel with every script.

Often, a show will have no more than two or three basic sets that are used episode to episode, and then a few other easily-understood sets (characters’ workplaces, restaurants, streets scenes) are also used regularly but not every episode.

#creative-writing #writing-exercise #writing-craft #writing #writing-tips #machine learning

Aria Smith

1607333509

Write My Paper for Me Online: Can You Do My Research Paper USA? TheWritingPlanet.com

We understand the paint that understudies need to experience every day considering the course that at whatever point you have completed all your astute necessities for your Ph.D. or of course MA, you’ll need to begin searching after the piece. So what do you think? Okay have the choice to control it with no other individual, or you require dissertation help from a readied capable? As a general rule, it’s a long cycle as you need to make a broad paper out of around 10 to 20 thousand words starting with the presentation of your subject and some time later your explanations behind why it should be dissected. Following the model, you’ll need to make a creation audit that will join the pushing assessments that will other than control your paper’s theoretical structure. It sounds tangled. Really, it is.

This assignment is one of the most tiring and unusual ones an understudy needs to look during his 16 to 18 years of training. In any case, once more, we have your back this time too. I handle the focuses above may have made you anxious about this undertaking, in any case we have proficient **dissertation service**s who give marvelous work affiliations. You’re at the ideal spot and that too at the ideal time since we have a markdown on the all out of our creation relationship at TheWritingPlanet. Subsequently, it’s the best an ideal open entry for you to benefit of our affiliations while you discharge your anxiety by chilling. In any case, it is commonly your decision to do it without anyone’s help or select an expert to do it for you.

You comprehend that a recommendation or hypothesis is unquestionably new for you, and you’ll need to battle while guiding it, so it will require an enormous heap of effort for you to begin and thusly finish it. Do you think you have great event to do it? Or of course plainly would you have the decision to do it as enough as an expert would do it? Contemplating everything, you’ll find your answer when you utilize TheWritingPlanet’s piece benefits that will help you in creation your hypothesis, proposition, or reference paper. Considering everything, remember you take hypothesis help from our association. Considering, you’ll be getting the help of a Ph.D. degree holder who has enormous combination with making a few affiliations and proposal papers beginning at now. It would other than help on the off chance that you didn’t stress over passing marks since you will accomplish the most raised of all. Do you know why? This is on the grounds that our party of journalists wires Ph.D. holders who were top graders in their particular fields and schools. Accordingly, you will get ensured results at TheWritingPlanet.

Is it affirmed that you are pushed considering the way that your cutoff time is moving closer?

Cutoff time a basic bit of the time changes into a shocking dream for understudies, and they everything thought about breeze up zeroing in on themselves. It moreover causes authentic clinical issues, for example, prepared assaults and dread assaults. Thinking about these parts, quite a while back, we started our trim office, which has appeared at the raised level at this point. In a little while, starting at now, the understudies are in an unclear condition, and we are their confirmations.

Teachers don’t like that the time they give for finishing the speculation isn’t sufficient for an understudy considering the way that an epic piece of the understudies have a colossal heap of different things on their can list. Some of them need to consider their family; some need to deal with their positions while some sit back pushing. Thusly, if your cutoff time is drawing nearer soon, you’re so far in no disposition regardless, your suggestion paper with no other individual, by then you’ll truly need to pick and hand over your undertaking to us. We won’t let you gobble up additional time since it continues moving endlessly from our hands, and we don’t have anything left back near the end.

We can help you at essential occasions when you perceive its absolutely unfathomable left you can do your article or proposition paper. On the off chance that you complete these assignments by us, you’ll clear as can be get your scholastics direct on target with surprising outcomes. Our makers are the best in their fields, and they outfit our customers with the best affiliations.

#custom-writing-services #write-my-paper #the-writing-planet #cheap-dissertation #the-writing-planet

Chloe  Butler

Chloe Butler

1667425440

Pdf2gerb: Perl Script Converts PDF Files to Gerber format

pdf2gerb

Perl script converts PDF files to Gerber format

Pdf2Gerb generates Gerber 274X photoplotting and Excellon drill files from PDFs of a PCB. Up to three PDFs are used: the top copper layer, the bottom copper layer (for 2-sided PCBs), and an optional silk screen layer. The PDFs can be created directly from any PDF drawing software, or a PDF print driver can be used to capture the Print output if the drawing software does not directly support output to PDF.

The general workflow is as follows:

  1. Design the PCB using your favorite CAD or drawing software.
  2. Print the top and bottom copper and top silk screen layers to a PDF file.
  3. Run Pdf2Gerb on the PDFs to create Gerber and Excellon files.
  4. Use a Gerber viewer to double-check the output against the original PCB design.
  5. Make adjustments as needed.
  6. Submit the files to a PCB manufacturer.

Please note that Pdf2Gerb does NOT perform DRC (Design Rule Checks), as these will vary according to individual PCB manufacturer conventions and capabilities. Also note that Pdf2Gerb is not perfect, so the output files must always be checked before submitting them. As of version 1.6, Pdf2Gerb supports most PCB elements, such as round and square pads, round holes, traces, SMD pads, ground planes, no-fill areas, and panelization. However, because it interprets the graphical output of a Print function, there are limitations in what it can recognize (or there may be bugs).

See docs/Pdf2Gerb.pdf for install/setup, config, usage, and other info.


pdf2gerb_cfg.pm

#Pdf2Gerb config settings:
#Put this file in same folder/directory as pdf2gerb.pl itself (global settings),
#or copy to another folder/directory with PDFs if you want PCB-specific settings.
#There is only one user of this file, so we don't need a custom package or namespace.
#NOTE: all constants defined in here will be added to main namespace.
#package pdf2gerb_cfg;

use strict; #trap undef vars (easier debug)
use warnings; #other useful info (easier debug)


##############################################################################################
#configurable settings:
#change values here instead of in main pfg2gerb.pl file

use constant WANT_COLORS => ($^O !~ m/Win/); #ANSI colors no worky on Windows? this must be set < first DebugPrint() call

#just a little warning; set realistic expectations:
#DebugPrint("${\(CYAN)}Pdf2Gerb.pl ${\(VERSION)}, $^O O/S\n${\(YELLOW)}${\(BOLD)}${\(ITALIC)}This is EXPERIMENTAL software.  \nGerber files MAY CONTAIN ERRORS.  Please CHECK them before fabrication!${\(RESET)}", 0); #if WANT_DEBUG

use constant METRIC => FALSE; #set to TRUE for metric units (only affect final numbers in output files, not internal arithmetic)
use constant APERTURE_LIMIT => 0; #34; #max #apertures to use; generate warnings if too many apertures are used (0 to not check)
use constant DRILL_FMT => '2.4'; #'2.3'; #'2.4' is the default for PCB fab; change to '2.3' for CNC

use constant WANT_DEBUG => 0; #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
use constant GERBER_DEBUG => 0; #level of debug to include in Gerber file; DON'T USE FOR FABRICATION
use constant WANT_STREAMS => FALSE; #TRUE; #save decompressed streams to files (for debug)
use constant WANT_ALLINPUT => FALSE; #TRUE; #save entire input stream (for debug ONLY)

#DebugPrint(sprintf("${\(CYAN)}DEBUG: stdout %d, gerber %d, want streams? %d, all input? %d, O/S: $^O, Perl: $]${\(RESET)}\n", WANT_DEBUG, GERBER_DEBUG, WANT_STREAMS, WANT_ALLINPUT), 1);
#DebugPrint(sprintf("max int = %d, min int = %d\n", MAXINT, MININT), 1); 

#define standard trace and pad sizes to reduce scaling or PDF rendering errors:
#This avoids weird aperture settings and replaces them with more standardized values.
#(I'm not sure how photoplotters handle strange sizes).
#Fewer choices here gives more accurate mapping in the final Gerber files.
#units are in inches
use constant TOOL_SIZES => #add more as desired
(
#round or square pads (> 0) and drills (< 0):
    .010, -.001,  #tiny pads for SMD; dummy drill size (too small for practical use, but needed so StandardTool will use this entry)
    .031, -.014,  #used for vias
    .041, -.020,  #smallest non-filled plated hole
    .051, -.025,
    .056, -.029,  #useful for IC pins
    .070, -.033,
    .075, -.040,  #heavier leads
#    .090, -.043,  #NOTE: 600 dpi is not high enough resolution to reliably distinguish between .043" and .046", so choose 1 of the 2 here
    .100, -.046,
    .115, -.052,
    .130, -.061,
    .140, -.067,
    .150, -.079,
    .175, -.088,
    .190, -.093,
    .200, -.100,
    .220, -.110,
    .160, -.125,  #useful for mounting holes
#some additional pad sizes without holes (repeat a previous hole size if you just want the pad size):
    .090, -.040,  #want a .090 pad option, but use dummy hole size
    .065, -.040, #.065 x .065 rect pad
    .035, -.040, #.035 x .065 rect pad
#traces:
    .001,  #too thin for real traces; use only for board outlines
    .006,  #minimum real trace width; mainly used for text
    .008,  #mainly used for mid-sized text, not traces
    .010,  #minimum recommended trace width for low-current signals
    .012,
    .015,  #moderate low-voltage current
    .020,  #heavier trace for power, ground (even if a lighter one is adequate)
    .025,
    .030,  #heavy-current traces; be careful with these ones!
    .040,
    .050,
    .060,
    .080,
    .100,
    .120,
);
#Areas larger than the values below will be filled with parallel lines:
#This cuts down on the number of aperture sizes used.
#Set to 0 to always use an aperture or drill, regardless of size.
use constant { MAX_APERTURE => max((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004, MAX_DRILL => -min((TOOL_SIZES)) + .004 }; #max aperture and drill sizes (plus a little tolerance)
#DebugPrint(sprintf("using %d standard tool sizes: %s, max aper %.3f, max drill %.3f\n", scalar((TOOL_SIZES)), join(", ", (TOOL_SIZES)), MAX_APERTURE, MAX_DRILL), 1);

#NOTE: Compare the PDF to the original CAD file to check the accuracy of the PDF rendering and parsing!
#for example, the CAD software I used generated the following circles for holes:
#CAD hole size:   parsed PDF diameter:      error:
#  .014                .016                +.002
#  .020                .02267              +.00267
#  .025                .026                +.001
#  .029                .03167              +.00267
#  .033                .036                +.003
#  .040                .04267              +.00267
#This was usually ~ .002" - .003" too big compared to the hole as displayed in the CAD software.
#To compensate for PDF rendering errors (either during CAD Print function or PDF parsing logic), adjust the values below as needed.
#units are pixels; for example, a value of 2.4 at 600 dpi = .0004 inch, 2 at 600 dpi = .0033"
use constant
{
    HOLE_ADJUST => -0.004 * 600, #-2.6, #holes seemed to be slightly oversized (by .002" - .004"), so shrink them a little
    RNDPAD_ADJUST => -0.003 * 600, #-2, #-2.4, #round pads seemed to be slightly oversized, so shrink them a little
    SQRPAD_ADJUST => +0.001 * 600, #+.5, #square pads are sometimes too small by .00067, so bump them up a little
    RECTPAD_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) rectangular pads seem to be okay? (not tested much)
    TRACE_ADJUST => 0, #(pixels) traces seemed to be okay?
    REDUCE_TOLERANCE => .001, #(inches) allow this much variation when reducing circles and rects
};

#Also, my CAD's Print function or the PDF print driver I used was a little off for circles, so define some additional adjustment values here:
#Values are added to X/Y coordinates; units are pixels; for example, a value of 1 at 600 dpi would be ~= .002 inch
use constant
{
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINX => 0,
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MINY => -0.001 * 600, #-1, #circles were a little too high, so nudge them a little lower
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXX => +0.001 * 600, #+1, #circles were a little too far to the left, so nudge them a little to the right
    CIRCLE_ADJUST_MAXY => 0,
    SUBST_CIRCLE_CLIPRECT => FALSE, #generate circle and substitute for clip rects (to compensate for the way some CAD software draws circles)
    WANT_CLIPRECT => TRUE, #FALSE, #AI doesn't need clip rect at all? should be on normally?
    RECT_COMPLETION => FALSE, #TRUE, #fill in 4th side of rect when 3 sides found
};

#allow .012 clearance around pads for solder mask:
#This value effectively adjusts pad sizes in the TOOL_SIZES list above (only for solder mask layers).
use constant SOLDER_MARGIN => +.012; #units are inches

#line join/cap styles:
use constant
{
    CAP_NONE => 0, #butt (none); line is exact length
    CAP_ROUND => 1, #round cap/join; line overhangs by a semi-circle at either end
    CAP_SQUARE => 2, #square cap/join; line overhangs by a half square on either end
    CAP_OVERRIDE => FALSE, #cap style overrides drawing logic
};
    
#number of elements in each shape type:
use constant
{
    RECT_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "rect" (start, end corners)
    LINE_SHAPELEN => 6, #x0, y0, x1, y1, count, "line" (line seg)
    CURVE_SHAPELEN => 10, #xstart, ystart, x0, y0, x1, y1, xend, yend, count, "curve" (bezier 2 points)
    CIRCLE_SHAPELEN => 5, #x, y, 5, count, "circle" (center + radius)
};
#const my %SHAPELEN =
#Readonly my %SHAPELEN =>
our %SHAPELEN =
(
    rect => RECT_SHAPELEN,
    line => LINE_SHAPELEN,
    curve => CURVE_SHAPELEN,
    circle => CIRCLE_SHAPELEN,
);

#panelization:
#This will repeat the entire body the number of times indicated along the X or Y axes (files grow accordingly).
#Display elements that overhang PCB boundary can be squashed or left as-is (typically text or other silk screen markings).
#Set "overhangs" TRUE to allow overhangs, FALSE to truncate them.
#xpad and ypad allow margins to be added around outer edge of panelized PCB.
use constant PANELIZE => {'x' => 1, 'y' => 1, 'xpad' => 0, 'ypad' => 0, 'overhangs' => TRUE}; #number of times to repeat in X and Y directions

# Set this to 1 if you need TurboCAD support.
#$turboCAD = FALSE; #is this still needed as an option?

#CIRCAD pad generation uses an appropriate aperture, then moves it (stroke) "a little" - we use this to find pads and distinguish them from PCB holes. 
use constant PAD_STROKE => 0.3; #0.0005 * 600; #units are pixels
#convert very short traces to pads or holes:
use constant TRACE_MINLEN => .001; #units are inches
#use constant ALWAYS_XY => TRUE; #FALSE; #force XY even if X or Y doesn't change; NOTE: needs to be TRUE for all pads to show in FlatCAM and ViewPlot
use constant REMOVE_POLARITY => FALSE; #TRUE; #set to remove subtractive (negative) polarity; NOTE: must be FALSE for ground planes

#PDF uses "points", each point = 1/72 inch
#combined with a PDF scale factor of .12, this gives 600 dpi resolution (1/72 * .12 = 600 dpi)
use constant INCHES_PER_POINT => 1/72; #0.0138888889; #multiply point-size by this to get inches

# The precision used when computing a bezier curve. Higher numbers are more precise but slower (and generate larger files).
#$bezierPrecision = 100;
use constant BEZIER_PRECISION => 36; #100; #use const; reduced for faster rendering (mainly used for silk screen and thermal pads)

# Ground planes and silk screen or larger copper rectangles or circles are filled line-by-line using this resolution.
use constant FILL_WIDTH => .01; #fill at most 0.01 inch at a time

# The max number of characters to read into memory
use constant MAX_BYTES => 10 * M; #bumped up to 10 MB, use const

use constant DUP_DRILL1 => TRUE; #FALSE; #kludge: ViewPlot doesn't load drill files that are too small so duplicate first tool

my $runtime = time(); #Time::HiRes::gettimeofday(); #measure my execution time

print STDERR "Loaded config settings from '${\(__FILE__)}'.\n";
1; #last value must be truthful to indicate successful load


#############################################################################################
#junk/experiment:

#use Package::Constants;
#use Exporter qw(import); #https://perldoc.perl.org/Exporter.html

#my $caller = "pdf2gerb::";

#sub cfg
#{
#    my $proto = shift;
#    my $class = ref($proto) || $proto;
#    my $settings =
#    {
#        $WANT_DEBUG => 990, #10; #level of debug wanted; higher == more, lower == less, 0 == none
#    };
#    bless($settings, $class);
#    return $settings;
#}

#use constant HELLO => "hi there2"; #"main::HELLO" => "hi there";
#use constant GOODBYE => 14; #"main::GOODBYE" => 12;

#print STDERR "read cfg file\n";

#our @EXPORT_OK = Package::Constants->list(__PACKAGE__); #https://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=1072691; NOTE: "_OK" skips short/common names

#print STDERR scalar(@EXPORT_OK) . " consts exported:\n";
#foreach(@EXPORT_OK) { print STDERR "$_\n"; }
#my $val = main::thing("xyz");
#print STDERR "caller gave me $val\n";
#foreach my $arg (@ARGV) { print STDERR "arg $arg\n"; }

Download Details:

Author: swannman
Source Code: https://github.com/swannman/pdf2gerb

License: GPL-3.0 license

#perl 

Generis: Versatile Go Code Generator

Generis

Versatile Go code generator.

Description

Generis is a lightweight code preprocessor adding the following features to the Go language :

  • Generics.
  • Free-form macros.
  • Conditional compilation.
  • HTML templating.
  • Allman style conversion.

Sample

package main;

// -- IMPORTS

import (
    "html"
    "io"
    "log"
    "net/http"
    "net/url"
    "strconv"
    );

// -- DEFINITIONS

#define DebugMode
#as true

// ~~

#define HttpPort
#as 8080

// ~~

#define WriteLine( {{text}} )
#as log.Println( {{text}} )

// ~~

#define local {{variable}} : {{type}};
#as var {{variable}} {{type}};

// ~~

#define DeclareStack( {{type}}, {{name}} )
#as
    // -- TYPES

    type {{name}}Stack struct
    {
        ElementArray []{{type}};
    }

    // -- INQUIRIES

    func ( stack * {{name}}Stack ) IsEmpty(
        ) bool
    {
        return len( stack.ElementArray ) == 0;
    }

    // -- OPERATIONS

    func ( stack * {{name}}Stack ) Push(
        element {{type}}
        )
    {
        stack.ElementArray = append( stack.ElementArray, element );
    }

    // ~~

    func ( stack * {{name}}Stack ) Pop(
        ) {{type}}
    {
        local
            element : {{type}};

        element = stack.ElementArray[ len( stack.ElementArray ) - 1 ];

        stack.ElementArray = stack.ElementArray[ : len( stack.ElementArray ) - 1 ];

        return element;
    }
#end

// ~~

#define DeclareStack( {{type}} )
#as DeclareStack( {{type}}, {{type:PascalCase}} )

// -- TYPES

DeclareStack( string )
DeclareStack( int32 )

// -- FUNCTIONS

func HandleRootPage(
    response_writer http.ResponseWriter,
    request * http.Request
    )
{
    local
        boolean : bool;
    local
        natural : uint;
    local
        integer : int;
    local
        real : float64;
    local
        escaped_html_text,
        escaped_url_text,
        text : string;
    local
        integer_stack : Int32Stack;

    boolean = true;
    natural = 10;
    integer = 20;
    real = 30.0;
    text = "text";
    escaped_url_text = "&escaped text?";
    escaped_html_text = "<escaped text/>";

    integer_stack.Push( 10 );
    integer_stack.Push( 20 );
    integer_stack.Push( 30 );

    #write response_writer
        <!DOCTYPE html>
        <html lang="en">
            <head>
                <meta charset="utf-8">
                <title><%= request.URL.Path %></title>
            </head>
            <body>
                <% if ( boolean ) { %>
                    <%= "URL : " + request.URL.Path %>
                    <br/>
                    <%@ natural %>
                    <%# integer %>
                    <%& real %>
                    <br/>
                    <%~ text %>
                    <%^ escaped_url_text %>
                    <%= escaped_html_text %>
                    <%= "<%% ignored %%>" %>
                    <%% ignored %%>
                <% } %>
                <br/>
                Stack :
                <br/>
                <% for !integer_stack.IsEmpty() { %>
                    <%# integer_stack.Pop() %>
                <% } %>
            </body>
        </html>
    #end
}

// ~~

func main()
{
    http.HandleFunc( "/", HandleRootPage );

    #if DebugMode
        WriteLine( "Listening on http://localhost:HttpPort" );
    #end

    log.Fatal(
        http.ListenAndServe( ":HttpPort", nil )
        );
}

Syntax

#define directive

Constants and generic code can be defined with the following syntax :

#define old code
#as new code

#define old code
#as
    new
    code
#end

#define
    old
    code
#as new code

#define
    old
    code
#as
    new
    code
#end

#define parameter

The #define directive can contain one or several parameters :

{{variable name}} : hierarchical code (with properly matching brackets and parentheses)
{{variable name#}} : statement code (hierarchical code without semicolon)
{{variable name$}} : plain code
{{variable name:boolean expression}} : conditional hierarchical code
{{variable name#:boolean expression}} : conditional statement code
{{variable name$:boolean expression}} : conditional plain code

They can have a boolean expression to require they match specific conditions :

HasText text
HasPrefix prefix
HasSuffix suffix
HasIdentifier text
false
true
!expression
expression && expression
expression || expression
( expression )

The #define directive must not start or end with a parameter.

#as parameter

The #as directive can use the value of the #define parameters :

{{variable name}}
{{variable name:filter function}}
{{variable name:filter function:filter function:...}}

Their value can be changed through one or several filter functions :

LowerCase
UpperCase
MinorCase
MajorCase
SnakeCase
PascalCase
CamelCase
RemoveComments
RemoveBlanks
PackStrings
PackIdentifiers
ReplacePrefix old_prefix new_prefix
ReplaceSuffix old_suffix new_suffix
ReplaceText old_text new_text
ReplaceIdentifier old_identifier new_identifier
AddPrefix prefix
AddSuffix suffix
RemovePrefix prefix
RemoveSuffix suffix
RemoveText text
RemoveIdentifier identifier

#if directive

Conditional code can be defined with the following syntax :

#if boolean expression
    #if boolean expression
        ...
    #else
        ...
    #end
#else
    #if boolean expression
        ...
    #else
        ...
    #end
#end

The boolean expression can use the following operators :

false
true
!expression
expression && expression
expression || expression
( expression )

#write directive

Templated HTML code can be sent to a stream writer using the following syntax :

#write writer expression
    <% code %>
    <%@ natural expression %>
    <%# integer expression %>
    <%& real expression %>
    <%~ text expression %>
    <%= escaped text expression %>
    <%! removed content %>
    <%% ignored tags %%>
#end

Limitations

  • There is no operator precedence in boolean expressions.
  • The --join option requires to end the statements with a semicolon.
  • The #writer directive is only available for the Go language.

Installation

Install the DMD 2 compiler (using the MinGW setup option on Windows).

Build the executable with the following command line :

dmd -m64 generis.d

Command line

generis [options]

Options

--prefix # : set the command prefix
--parse INPUT_FOLDER/ : parse the definitions of the Generis files in the input folder
--process INPUT_FOLDER/ OUTPUT_FOLDER/ : reads the Generis files in the input folder and writes the processed files in the output folder
--trim : trim the HTML templates
--join : join the split statements
--create : create the output folders if needed
--watch : watch the Generis files for modifications
--pause 500 : time to wait before checking the Generis files again
--tabulation 4 : set the tabulation space count
--extension .go : generate files with this extension

Examples

generis --process GS/ GO/

Reads the Generis files in the GS/ folder and writes Go files in the GO/ folder.

generis --process GS/ GO/ --create

Reads the Generis files in the GS/ folder and writes Go files in the GO/ folder, creating the output folders if needed.

generis --process GS/ GO/ --create --watch

Reads the Generis files in the GS/ folder and writes Go files in the GO/ folder, creating the output folders if needed and watching the Generis files for modifications.

generis --process GS/ GO/ --trim --join --create --watch

Reads the Generis files in the GS/ folder and writes Go files in the GO/ folder, trimming the HTML templates, joining the split statements, creating the output folders if needed and watching the Generis files for modifications.

Version

2.0

Author: Senselogic
Source Code: https://github.com/senselogic/GENERIS 
License: View license

#go #golang #code