Nigel  Uys

Nigel Uys

1672999928

Ansible-role-mysql: Ansible Role - MySQL

Ansible Role: MySQL

Installs and configures MySQL or MariaDB server on RHEL/CentOS or Debian/Ubuntu servers.

Requirements

No special requirements; note that this role requires root access, so either run it in a playbook with a global become: yes, or invoke the role in your playbook like:

- hosts: database
  roles:
    - role: geerlingguy.mysql
      become: yes

Role Variables

Available variables are listed below, along with default values (see defaults/main.yml):

mysql_user_home: /root
mysql_user_name: root
mysql_user_password: root

The home directory inside which Python MySQL settings will be stored, which Ansible will use when connecting to MySQL. This should be the home directory of the user which runs this Ansible role. The mysql_user_name and mysql_user_password can be set if you are running this role under a non-root user account and want to set a non-root user.

mysql_root_home: /root
mysql_root_username: root
mysql_root_password: root

The MySQL root user account details.

mysql_root_password_update: false

Whether to force update the MySQL root user's password. By default, this role will only change the root user's password when MySQL is first configured. You can force an update by setting this to yes.

Note: If you get an error like ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES) after a failed or interrupted playbook run, this usually means the root password wasn't originally updated to begin with. Try either removing the .my.cnf file inside the configured mysql_user_home or updating it and setting password='' (the insecure default password). Run the playbook again, with mysql_root_password_update set to yes, and the setup should complete.

Note: If you get an error like ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES) when trying to log in from the CLI you might need to run as root or sudoer.

mysql_enabled_on_startup: true

Whether MySQL should be enabled on startup.

mysql_config_file: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_config_include_dir: *default value depends on OS*

The main my.cnf configuration file and include directory.

overwrite_global_mycnf: true

Whether the global my.cnf should be overwritten each time this role is run. Setting this to no tells Ansible to only create the my.cnf file if it doesn't exist. This should be left at its default value (yes) if you'd like to use this role's variables to configure MySQL.

mysql_config_include_files: []

A list of files that should override the default global my.cnf. Each item in the array requires a "src" parameter which is a path to a file. An optional "force" parameter can force the file to be updated each time ansible runs.

mysql_databases: []

The MySQL databases to create. A database has the values name, encoding (defaults to utf8), collation (defaults to utf8_general_ci) and replicate (defaults to 1, only used if replication is configured). The formats of these are the same as in the mysql_db module.

You can also delete a database (or ensure it's not on the server) by setting state to absent (defaults to present).

mysql_users: []

The MySQL users and their privileges. A user has the values:

  • name
  • host (defaults to localhost)
  • password (can be plaintext or encrypted—if encrypted, set encrypted: yes)
  • encrypted (defaults to no)
  • priv (defaults to *.*:USAGE)
  • append_privs (defaults to no)
  • state (defaults to present)

The formats of these are the same as in the mysql_user module.

mysql_packages:
  - mysql
  - mysql-server

(OS-specific, RedHat/CentOS defaults listed here) Packages to be installed. In some situations, you may need to add additional packages, like mysql-devel.

mysql_enablerepo: ""

(RedHat/CentOS only) If you have enabled any additional repositories (might I suggest geerlingguy.repo-epel or geerlingguy.repo-remi), those repositories can be listed under this variable (e.g. remi,epel). This can be handy, as an example, if you want to install later versions of MySQL.

mysql_python_package_debian: python3-mysqldb

(Ubuntu/Debian only) If you need to explicitly override the MySQL Python package, you can set it here. Set this to python-mysqldb if using older distributions running Python 2.

mysql_port: "3306"
mysql_bind_address: '0.0.0.0'
mysql_datadir: /var/lib/mysql
mysql_socket: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_pid_file: *default value depends on OS*

Default MySQL connection configuration.

mysql_log_file_group: mysql *adm on Debian*
mysql_log: ""
mysql_log_error: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_syslog_tag: *default value depends on OS*
```yaml

MySQL logging configuration. Setting `mysql_log` (the general query log) or `mysql_log_error` to `syslog` will make MySQL log to syslog using the `mysql_syslog_tag`.

```yaml
mysql_slow_query_log_enabled: false
mysql_slow_query_log_file: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_slow_query_time: 2

Slow query log settings. Note that the log file will be created by this role, but if you're running on a server with SELinux or AppArmor, you may need to add this path to the allowed paths for MySQL, or disable the mysql profile. For example, on Debian/Ubuntu, you can run sudo ln -s /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld /etc/apparmor.d/disable/usr.sbin.mysqld && sudo service apparmor restart.

mysql_key_buffer_size: "256M"
mysql_max_allowed_packet: "64M"
mysql_table_open_cache: "256"
...

The rest of the settings in defaults/main.yml control MySQL's memory usage and some other common settings. The default values are tuned for a server where MySQL can consume 512 MB RAM, so you should consider adjusting them to suit your particular server better.

mysql_server_id: "1"
mysql_max_binlog_size: "100M"
mysql_binlog_format: "ROW"
mysql_expire_logs_days: "10"
mysql_replication_role: ''
mysql_replication_master: ''
mysql_replication_user: {}

Replication settings. Set mysql_server_id and mysql_replication_role by server (e.g. the master would be ID 1, with the mysql_replication_role of master, and the slave would be ID 2, with the mysql_replication_role of slave). The mysql_replication_user uses the same keys as individual list items in mysql_users, and is created on master servers, and used to replicate on all the slaves.

mysql_replication_master needs to resolve to an IP or a hostname which is accessable to the Slaves (this could be a /etc/hosts injection or some other means), otherwise the slaves cannot communicate to the master.

If the replication master has different IP addresses where you are running ansible and where the mysql replica is running, you can optionally specify a mysql_replication_master_inventory_host to access the machine (e.g. you run ansible on your local machine, but the mysql master and replica need to communicate on a different network)

Later versions of MySQL on CentOS 7

If you want to install MySQL from the official repository instead of installing the system default MariaDB equivalents, you can add the following pre_tasks task in your playbook:

  pre_tasks:
    - name: Install the MySQL repo.
      yum:
        name: http://repo.mysql.com/mysql-community-release-el7-5.noarch.rpm
        state: present
      when: ansible_os_family == "RedHat"
  
    - name: Override variables for MySQL (RedHat).
      set_fact:
        mysql_daemon: mysqld
        mysql_packages: ['mysql-server']
        mysql_log_error: /var/log/mysqld.err
        mysql_syslog_tag: mysqld
        mysql_pid_file: /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid
        mysql_socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
      when: ansible_os_family == "RedHat"

MariaDB usage

This role works with either MySQL or a compatible version of MariaDB. On RHEL/CentOS 7+, the mariadb database engine was substituted as the default MySQL replacement package. No modifications are necessary though all of the variables still reference 'mysql' instead of mariadb.

Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 MariaDB configuration

On Ubuntu, the package names are named differently, so the mysql_package variable needs to be altered. Set the following variables (at a minimum):

mysql_packages:
  - mariadb-client
  - mariadb-server
  - python-mysqldb

Dependencies

If you have ansible installed (e.g. pip3 install ansible), none.

If you have only installed ansible-core, be sure to require community.mysql in your collections/requirements.yml or install it manually with ansible-galaxy collection install community.mysql.

Example Playbook

- hosts: db-servers
  become: yes
  vars_files:
    - vars/main.yml
  roles:
    - { role: geerlingguy.mysql }

Inside vars/main.yml:

mysql_root_password: super-secure-password
mysql_databases:
  - name: example_db
    encoding: latin1
    collation: latin1_general_ci
mysql_users:
  - name: example_user
    host: "%"
    password: similarly-secure-password
    priv: "example_db.*:ALL"

Download Details:

Author: Geerlingguy
Source Code: https://github.com/geerlingguy/ansible-role-mysql 
License: MIT license

#ansible #mysql #database #playbook 

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Ansible-role-mysql: Ansible Role - MySQL
Joe  Hoppe

Joe Hoppe

1595905879

Best MySQL DigitalOcean Performance – ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean Managed Databases

HTML to Markdown

MySQL is the all-time number one open source database in the world, and a staple in RDBMS space. DigitalOcean is quickly building its reputation as the developers cloud by providing an affordable, flexible and easy to use cloud platform for developers to work with. MySQL on DigitalOcean is a natural fit, but what’s the best way to deploy your cloud database? In this post, we are going to compare the top two providers, DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL vs. ScaleGrid MySQL hosting on DigitalOcean.

At a glance – TLDR
ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 1st pointCompare Throughput
ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 2nd pointCompare Latency
On average, ScaleGrid achieves almost 30% lower latency over DigitalOcean for the same deployment configurations. Read now

ScaleGrid Blog - At a glance overview - 3rd pointCompare Pricing
ScaleGrid provides 30% more storage on average vs. DigitalOcean for MySQL at the same affordable price. Read now

MySQL DigitalOcean Performance Benchmark
In this benchmark, we compare equivalent plan sizes between ScaleGrid MySQL on DigitalOcean and DigitalOcean Managed Databases for MySQL. We are going to use a common, popular plan size using the below configurations for this performance benchmark:

Comparison Overview
ScaleGridDigitalOceanInstance TypeMedium: 4 vCPUsMedium: 4 vCPUsMySQL Version8.0.208.0.20RAM8GB8GBSSD140GB115GBDeployment TypeStandaloneStandaloneRegionSF03SF03SupportIncludedBusiness-level support included with account sizes over $500/monthMonthly Price$120$120

As you can see above, ScaleGrid and DigitalOcean offer the same plan configurations across this plan size, apart from SSD where ScaleGrid provides over 20% more storage for the same price.

To ensure the most accurate results in our performance tests, we run the benchmark four times for each comparison to find the average performance across throughput and latency over read-intensive workloads, balanced workloads, and write-intensive workloads.

Throughput
In this benchmark, we measure MySQL throughput in terms of queries per second (QPS) to measure our query efficiency. To quickly summarize the results, we display read-intensive, write-intensive and balanced workload averages below for 150 threads for ScaleGrid vs. DigitalOcean MySQL:

ScaleGrid MySQL vs DigitalOcean Managed Databases - Throughput Performance Graph

For the common 150 thread comparison, ScaleGrid averages almost 40% higher throughput over DigitalOcean for MySQL, with up to 46% higher throughput in write-intensive workloads.

#cloud #database #developer #digital ocean #mysql #performance #scalegrid #95th percentile latency #balanced workloads #developers cloud #digitalocean droplet #digitalocean managed databases #digitalocean performance #digitalocean pricing #higher throughput #latency benchmark #lower latency #mysql benchmark setup #mysql client threads #mysql configuration #mysql digitalocean #mysql latency #mysql on digitalocean #mysql throughput #performance benchmark #queries per second #read-intensive #scalegrid mysql #scalegrid vs. digitalocean #throughput benchmark #write-intensive

Nigel  Uys

Nigel Uys

1672999928

Ansible-role-mysql: Ansible Role - MySQL

Ansible Role: MySQL

Installs and configures MySQL or MariaDB server on RHEL/CentOS or Debian/Ubuntu servers.

Requirements

No special requirements; note that this role requires root access, so either run it in a playbook with a global become: yes, or invoke the role in your playbook like:

- hosts: database
  roles:
    - role: geerlingguy.mysql
      become: yes

Role Variables

Available variables are listed below, along with default values (see defaults/main.yml):

mysql_user_home: /root
mysql_user_name: root
mysql_user_password: root

The home directory inside which Python MySQL settings will be stored, which Ansible will use when connecting to MySQL. This should be the home directory of the user which runs this Ansible role. The mysql_user_name and mysql_user_password can be set if you are running this role under a non-root user account and want to set a non-root user.

mysql_root_home: /root
mysql_root_username: root
mysql_root_password: root

The MySQL root user account details.

mysql_root_password_update: false

Whether to force update the MySQL root user's password. By default, this role will only change the root user's password when MySQL is first configured. You can force an update by setting this to yes.

Note: If you get an error like ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES) after a failed or interrupted playbook run, this usually means the root password wasn't originally updated to begin with. Try either removing the .my.cnf file inside the configured mysql_user_home or updating it and setting password='' (the insecure default password). Run the playbook again, with mysql_root_password_update set to yes, and the setup should complete.

Note: If you get an error like ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES) when trying to log in from the CLI you might need to run as root or sudoer.

mysql_enabled_on_startup: true

Whether MySQL should be enabled on startup.

mysql_config_file: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_config_include_dir: *default value depends on OS*

The main my.cnf configuration file and include directory.

overwrite_global_mycnf: true

Whether the global my.cnf should be overwritten each time this role is run. Setting this to no tells Ansible to only create the my.cnf file if it doesn't exist. This should be left at its default value (yes) if you'd like to use this role's variables to configure MySQL.

mysql_config_include_files: []

A list of files that should override the default global my.cnf. Each item in the array requires a "src" parameter which is a path to a file. An optional "force" parameter can force the file to be updated each time ansible runs.

mysql_databases: []

The MySQL databases to create. A database has the values name, encoding (defaults to utf8), collation (defaults to utf8_general_ci) and replicate (defaults to 1, only used if replication is configured). The formats of these are the same as in the mysql_db module.

You can also delete a database (or ensure it's not on the server) by setting state to absent (defaults to present).

mysql_users: []

The MySQL users and their privileges. A user has the values:

  • name
  • host (defaults to localhost)
  • password (can be plaintext or encrypted—if encrypted, set encrypted: yes)
  • encrypted (defaults to no)
  • priv (defaults to *.*:USAGE)
  • append_privs (defaults to no)
  • state (defaults to present)

The formats of these are the same as in the mysql_user module.

mysql_packages:
  - mysql
  - mysql-server

(OS-specific, RedHat/CentOS defaults listed here) Packages to be installed. In some situations, you may need to add additional packages, like mysql-devel.

mysql_enablerepo: ""

(RedHat/CentOS only) If you have enabled any additional repositories (might I suggest geerlingguy.repo-epel or geerlingguy.repo-remi), those repositories can be listed under this variable (e.g. remi,epel). This can be handy, as an example, if you want to install later versions of MySQL.

mysql_python_package_debian: python3-mysqldb

(Ubuntu/Debian only) If you need to explicitly override the MySQL Python package, you can set it here. Set this to python-mysqldb if using older distributions running Python 2.

mysql_port: "3306"
mysql_bind_address: '0.0.0.0'
mysql_datadir: /var/lib/mysql
mysql_socket: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_pid_file: *default value depends on OS*

Default MySQL connection configuration.

mysql_log_file_group: mysql *adm on Debian*
mysql_log: ""
mysql_log_error: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_syslog_tag: *default value depends on OS*
```yaml

MySQL logging configuration. Setting `mysql_log` (the general query log) or `mysql_log_error` to `syslog` will make MySQL log to syslog using the `mysql_syslog_tag`.

```yaml
mysql_slow_query_log_enabled: false
mysql_slow_query_log_file: *default value depends on OS*
mysql_slow_query_time: 2

Slow query log settings. Note that the log file will be created by this role, but if you're running on a server with SELinux or AppArmor, you may need to add this path to the allowed paths for MySQL, or disable the mysql profile. For example, on Debian/Ubuntu, you can run sudo ln -s /etc/apparmor.d/usr.sbin.mysqld /etc/apparmor.d/disable/usr.sbin.mysqld && sudo service apparmor restart.

mysql_key_buffer_size: "256M"
mysql_max_allowed_packet: "64M"
mysql_table_open_cache: "256"
...

The rest of the settings in defaults/main.yml control MySQL's memory usage and some other common settings. The default values are tuned for a server where MySQL can consume 512 MB RAM, so you should consider adjusting them to suit your particular server better.

mysql_server_id: "1"
mysql_max_binlog_size: "100M"
mysql_binlog_format: "ROW"
mysql_expire_logs_days: "10"
mysql_replication_role: ''
mysql_replication_master: ''
mysql_replication_user: {}

Replication settings. Set mysql_server_id and mysql_replication_role by server (e.g. the master would be ID 1, with the mysql_replication_role of master, and the slave would be ID 2, with the mysql_replication_role of slave). The mysql_replication_user uses the same keys as individual list items in mysql_users, and is created on master servers, and used to replicate on all the slaves.

mysql_replication_master needs to resolve to an IP or a hostname which is accessable to the Slaves (this could be a /etc/hosts injection or some other means), otherwise the slaves cannot communicate to the master.

If the replication master has different IP addresses where you are running ansible and where the mysql replica is running, you can optionally specify a mysql_replication_master_inventory_host to access the machine (e.g. you run ansible on your local machine, but the mysql master and replica need to communicate on a different network)

Later versions of MySQL on CentOS 7

If you want to install MySQL from the official repository instead of installing the system default MariaDB equivalents, you can add the following pre_tasks task in your playbook:

  pre_tasks:
    - name: Install the MySQL repo.
      yum:
        name: http://repo.mysql.com/mysql-community-release-el7-5.noarch.rpm
        state: present
      when: ansible_os_family == "RedHat"
  
    - name: Override variables for MySQL (RedHat).
      set_fact:
        mysql_daemon: mysqld
        mysql_packages: ['mysql-server']
        mysql_log_error: /var/log/mysqld.err
        mysql_syslog_tag: mysqld
        mysql_pid_file: /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid
        mysql_socket: /var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
      when: ansible_os_family == "RedHat"

MariaDB usage

This role works with either MySQL or a compatible version of MariaDB. On RHEL/CentOS 7+, the mariadb database engine was substituted as the default MySQL replacement package. No modifications are necessary though all of the variables still reference 'mysql' instead of mariadb.

Ubuntu 14.04 and 16.04 MariaDB configuration

On Ubuntu, the package names are named differently, so the mysql_package variable needs to be altered. Set the following variables (at a minimum):

mysql_packages:
  - mariadb-client
  - mariadb-server
  - python-mysqldb

Dependencies

If you have ansible installed (e.g. pip3 install ansible), none.

If you have only installed ansible-core, be sure to require community.mysql in your collections/requirements.yml or install it manually with ansible-galaxy collection install community.mysql.

Example Playbook

- hosts: db-servers
  become: yes
  vars_files:
    - vars/main.yml
  roles:
    - { role: geerlingguy.mysql }

Inside vars/main.yml:

mysql_root_password: super-secure-password
mysql_databases:
  - name: example_db
    encoding: latin1
    collation: latin1_general_ci
mysql_users:
  - name: example_user
    host: "%"
    password: similarly-secure-password
    priv: "example_db.*:ALL"

Download Details:

Author: Geerlingguy
Source Code: https://github.com/geerlingguy/ansible-role-mysql 
License: MIT license

#ansible #mysql #database #playbook 

Loma  Baumbach

Loma Baumbach

1595781840

Exploring MySQL Binlog Server - Ripple

MySQL does not limit the number of slaves that you can connect to the master server in a replication topology. However, as the number of slaves increases, they will have a toll on the master resources because the binary logs will need to be served to different slaves working at different speeds. If the data churn on the master is high, the serving of binary logs alone could saturate the network interface of the master.

A classic solution for this problem is to deploy a binlog server – an intermediate proxy server that sits between the master and its slaves. The binlog server is set up as a slave to the master, and in turn, acts as a master to the original set of slaves. It receives binary log events from the master, does not apply these events, but serves them to all the other slaves. This way, the load on the master is tremendously reduced, and at the same time, the binlog server serves the binlogs more efficiently to slaves since it does not have to do any other database server processing.

MySQL Binlog Server Deployment Diagram - ScaleGrid Blog

Ripple is an open source binlog server developed by Pavel Ivanov. A blog post from Percona, titled MySQL Ripple: The First Impression of a MySQL Binlog Server, gives a very good introduction to deploying and using Ripple. I had an opportunity to explore Ripple in some more detail and wanted to share my observations through this post.

1. Support for GTID based replication

Ripple supports only GTID mode, and not file and position-based replication. If your master is running in non-GTID mode, you will get this error from Ripple:

Failed to read packet: Got error reading packet from server: The replication sender thread cannot start in AUTO_POSITION mode: this server has GTID_MODE = OFF instead of ON.

You can specify Server_id and UUID for the ripple server using the cmd line options: -ripple_server_id and -ripple_server_uuid

Both are optional parameters, and if not specified, Ripple will use the default server_id=112211 and uuid will be auto generated.

2. Connecting to the master using replication user and password

While connecting to the master, you can specify the replication user and password using the command line options:

-ripple_master_user and -ripple_master_password

3. Connection endpoint for the Ripple server

You can use the command line options -ripple_server_ports and -ripple_server_address to specify the connection end points for the Ripple server. Ensure to specify the network accessible hostname or IP address of your Ripple server as the -rippple_server_address. Otherwise, by default, Ripple will bind to localhost and hence you will not be able to connect to it remotely.

4. Setting up slaves to the Ripple server

You can use the CHANGE MASTER TO command to connect your slaves to replicate from the Ripple server.

To ensure that Ripple can authenticate the password that you use to connect to it, you need to start Ripple by specifying the option -ripple_server_password_hash

For example, if you start the ripple server with the command:

rippled -ripple_datadir=./binlog_server -ripple_master_address= <master ip> -ripple_master_port=3306 -ripple_master_user=repl -ripple_master_password='password' -ripple_server_ports=15000 -ripple_server_address='172.31.23.201' -ripple_server_password_hash='EF8C75CB6E99A0732D2DE207DAEF65D555BDFB8E'

you can use the following CHANGE MASTER TO command to connect from the slave:

CHANGE MASTER TO master_host='172.31.23.201', master_port=15000, master_password=’XpKWeZRNH5#satCI’, master_user=’rep’

Note that the password hash specified for the Ripple server corresponds to the text password used in the CHANGE MASTER TO command. Currently, Ripple does not authenticate based on the usernames and accepts any non-empty username as long as the password matches.

Exploring MySQL Binlog Server - Ripple

CLICK TO TWEET

5. Ripple server management

It’s possible to monitor and manage the Ripple server using the MySQL protocol from any standard MySQL client. There are a limited set of commands that are supported which you can see directly in the source code on the mysql-ripple GitHub page.

Some of the useful commands are:

  • SELECT @@global.gtid_executed; – To see the GTID SET of the Ripple server based on its downloaded binary logs.
  • STOP SLAVE; – To disconnect the Ripple server from the master.
  • START SLAVE; – To connect the Ripple server to the master.

#cloud #database #developer #high availability #mysql #performance #binary logs #gtid replication #mysql binlog #mysql protocol #mysql ripple #mysql server #parallel threads #proxy server #replication topology #ripple server

Awesome Ansible List

Awesome Ansible

A collaborative curated list of awesome Ansible resources, tools, Roles, tutorials and other related stuff.

Ansible is an open source toolkit, written in Python, it is used for configuration management, application deployment, continuous delivery, IT infrastructure automation and automation in general.

Official resources

Official resources by and for Ansible.

Community

Places where to chat with the Ansible community

Tutorials

Tutorials and courses to learn Ansible.

Books

Books about Ansible.

Videos

Video tutorials and Ansible training.

Tools

Tools for and using Ansible.

  • Ansible Tower - Ansible Tower by Red Hat helps you scale IT automation, manage complex deployments and speed productivity. Extend the power of Ansible to your entire team.
  • AWX - AWX provides a web-based user interface, REST API, and task engine built on top of Ansible. It is the upstream project for Tower, a commercial derivative of AWX.
  • Ansible Lint - Checks Playbooks for best practices and behavior that could potentially be improved.
  • Ansible Later - Another best practice scanner. Checks Playbooks and Roles for best practices and behavior that could potentially be improved.
  • Ansible Doctor - Simple annotation like documentation generator for Ansible roles based on Jinja2 templates.
  • Ansible cmdb - Takes the output of Ansible's fact gathering and converts it into a static HTML page.
  • ARA - ARA Records Ansible playbooks and makes them easier to understand and troubleshoot with a reporting API, UI and CLI.
  • Mitogen for Ansible - Speed up Ansible substantially with Mitogen.
  • Molecule - Molecule aids in the development and testing of Ansible roles.
  • Packer Ansible Provisioner - This Provisioner can be used to automate VM Image creation via Packer with Ansible.
  • Excel Ansible Inventory - Turn any Excel Spreadsheet into an Ansible Inventory.
  • terraform.py - Ansible dynamic inventory script for parsing Terraform state files.
  • ansible-navigator - A text-based user interface (TUI) for Ansible.
  • squest - Self-service portal for Ansible Tower job templates.
  • ansible-bender - Tool which bends containers using Ansible playbooks and turns them into container images.
  • ansible-runner - A tool and python library that helps when interfacing with Ansible directly or as part of another system whether that be through a container image interface, as a standalone tool, or as a Python module that can be imported.
  • ansible-builder - Using Ansible content that depends on non-default dependencies can be tricky. Packages must be installed on each node, play nicely with other software installed on the host system, and be kept in sync.
  • kics - SAST Tool that scans your ansible infrastructure as code playbooks for security vulnverables, compliance issues and misconfigurations.
  • php-ansible Library - OOP-Wrapper for Ansible, making Ansible available in PHP.
  • TD4A - Design aid for building and testing jinja2 templates, combines data in yaml format with a jinja2 template and render the output.
  • Ansible Playbook Grapher - Command line tool to create a graph representing your Ansible playbook plays, tasks and roles.
  • ansible-doc-extractor - A tool that extracts documentation from Ansible modules in the HTML form.
  • Ansible Semaphore - Ansible Semaphore is a modern UI for Ansible.

Blog posts and opinions

Best practices and other opinions on Ansible.

German

Playbooks, Roles and Collections

Awesome production ready Playbooks, Roles and Collections to get you up and running.


Download Details:

Author: ansible-community
Source Code: https://github.com/ansible-community/awesome-ansible

License: CC0-1.0 license

#ansible 

Devyn  Reilly

Devyn Reilly

1618900707

Setting MySQL Configuration Variables – MySQL 5.7 vs MySQL 8.0

MySQL configuration variables are a set of server system variables used to configure the operation and behavior of the server. In this blog post, we will explain the differences in managing the configuration variables between MySQL 5.7 and MySQL 8.0.

We will explain three different ways for setting the configuration variables based on your use-case. Configuration variables that can be set at run time are called Dynamic variables and those that need a MySQL server restart to take effect are called Non-Dynamic variables.

Setting MySQL Configuration Variables

#mysql #mysql 5.7 #mysql 8.0 #mysql server