An inside look at the Rust programming language

Rust, an open source programming language, has been the “most loved language” on developer community Stack Overflow’s annual survey for the last four years. At the same time only a very, very small number of developers actually use Rust today – a July 2020 look at the PYPL PopularitY of Programming Languages Index ranks it at number 18 with just .81% interest. (For comparison Python is at nearly 32% and Java is over 17%.)

So why the intense love of Rust? To put it simply, it was created to solve problems present in other languages and if you can take the time to unlock its (admittedly difficult) secrets, you’re rewarded with cleaner, faster, and most importantly, safer code.

Antony Saba, a senior security engineer with Strategic Security at GitLab, recently talked about Rust during a company-wide series of meetings (Contribute 2020). He speaks from experience as his last employer was a Rust-based company. “Okay, so what’s Rust’s promise?” Saba asked. “Rust’s promise is that it should be easier, and everybody should be able to fearlessly write at a systems level and not have to worry about memory safety or thread safety, or at least worry about it in the way that is supported by the language and the tools.”

Let’s unpack what that means.

Where it started

The open source Rust community describes the language as fast, reliable and productive. “Hundreds of companies around the world are using Rust in production for fast, low-resource cross-platform solutions,” the organization says. Firefox and DropBox are two well-known users of Rust today, and Mozilla (creator of Firefox) was the first original supporter of Rust.

Think of Rust as the answer to a data-rich problem that will likely need lots of computational cycles. Mozilla’s Rust documentation specifically calls out the language as ideal for “game engines, operating systems, file systems, browser components and simulation engines for virtual reality.”

Under the hood

Rust is a bit of a hybrid, according to Mozilla’s Rust documentation. Rust offers developers the syntax advantages of high-level languages with the “control and performance of a low-level language,” the documentation explains.

Rust is a statically typed language rather than a dynamic one. Though developers like to argue the merits of both, Rust, like popular TypeScript, eliminates the frustration of “dynamic typing.” Data is constrained and checked by a compiler so confusion is minimized. Rust also makes it very hard to ignore errors – Steve Donovan, author of “A Gentle Guide to Rust,” jokes it can be hard not to think the compiler is shouting at you when you make a mistake.

Donovan identifies Rust’s key principles as:

  • Strictly enforcing safe borrowing of data
  • Functions, methods, and closures to operate on data
  • Tuples, structs, and enums to aggregate data
  • Pattern matching to select and destructure data
  • Traits to define behaviour on data

All of those guardrails lead to a language that can create fast-moving code with few things that slow it down. There’s no runtime or garbage collector making Rust ideal for applications where memory usage is at a premium (like embedded devices). But if there is a place where Rust really stands out, it’s security. Donovant points out that Rust is “safe by default,” unlike C or C++. No one can corrupt memory by default, he writes.

#rust #language

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An inside look at the Rust programming language

RUST on programming language

The title is a bit confusing to understand the context of the content. In this blog, I am going to run around and see the different aspects of programming language rust. And talk about the concepts that it introduces that are useful for various aspects of programming.

What is Rust?

Simply putting it is a statically as well as strongly typed programming language.

Let me explain:

_statically typed _indicates that all the datatypes that are expressed in the code are known at compile time and memory allocation is done properly.

Image for post

Then what is 👆 that? Let’s just say rust knows what you want to say.

But this doesn’t mean you could declare variables for a complex data type and expect rust to understand. Here comes the next point I mentioned above.

_strongly typed _indicates that the types are designed to make it harder to write syntatically incorrect code.

If you were to do even a little mistake with the syntax or definition of variables then the errors are caught at compile time. Not just the syntax errors but there are various tests build in the compiler to check for unused variablesdead code(Code that will never run), infinite loops as well as the lifetime of variables.

#security #programming #programming-languages #rust

Cayla  Erdman

Cayla Erdman

1594369800

Introduction to Structured Query Language SQL pdf

SQL stands for Structured Query Language. SQL is a scripting language expected to store, control, and inquiry information put away in social databases. The main manifestation of SQL showed up in 1974, when a gathering in IBM built up the principal model of a social database. The primary business social database was discharged by Relational Software later turning out to be Oracle.

Models for SQL exist. In any case, the SQL that can be utilized on every last one of the major RDBMS today is in various flavors. This is because of two reasons:

1. The SQL order standard is genuinely intricate, and it isn’t handy to actualize the whole standard.

2. Every database seller needs an approach to separate its item from others.

Right now, contrasts are noted where fitting.

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Biju Augustian

Biju Augustian

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Guide to Python Programming Language

Description
The course will lead you from beginning level to advance in Python Programming Language. You do not need any prior knowledge on Python or any programming language or even programming to join the course and become an expert on the topic.

The course is begin continuously developing by adding lectures regularly.

Please see the Promo and free sample video to get to know more.

Hope you will enjoy it.

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Alayna  Rippin

Alayna Rippin

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OS in Rust: An executable that runs on bare metal

This is the very first blog of the series that pertains to create a basic Operating System using Rust Programming Language.

The aim of this series is to learn and understand the basics of Operating System. Through this series, you will get some ideas about the internal components of Operating System and how they interact with each other.

In this article, we will create a freestanding binary (an executable) that has the capability to run on bare metal. To create that executable we need to follow certain steps:

Steps to create a bare-metal executable:

  • Disable standard library
  • Define custom panic handler
  • Provide language items
  • Provide entry point
  • Build executable

#functional programming #rust #rust programming language #system programming

An inside look at the Rust programming language

Rust, an open source programming language, has been the “most loved language” on developer community Stack Overflow’s annual survey for the last four years. At the same time only a very, very small number of developers actually use Rust today – a July 2020 look at the PYPL PopularitY of Programming Languages Index ranks it at number 18 with just .81% interest. (For comparison Python is at nearly 32% and Java is over 17%.)

So why the intense love of Rust? To put it simply, it was created to solve problems present in other languages and if you can take the time to unlock its (admittedly difficult) secrets, you’re rewarded with cleaner, faster, and most importantly, safer code.

Antony Saba, a senior security engineer with Strategic Security at GitLab, recently talked about Rust during a company-wide series of meetings (Contribute 2020). He speaks from experience as his last employer was a Rust-based company. “Okay, so what’s Rust’s promise?” Saba asked. “Rust’s promise is that it should be easier, and everybody should be able to fearlessly write at a systems level and not have to worry about memory safety or thread safety, or at least worry about it in the way that is supported by the language and the tools.”

Let’s unpack what that means.

Where it started

The open source Rust community describes the language as fast, reliable and productive. “Hundreds of companies around the world are using Rust in production for fast, low-resource cross-platform solutions,” the organization says. Firefox and DropBox are two well-known users of Rust today, and Mozilla (creator of Firefox) was the first original supporter of Rust.

Think of Rust as the answer to a data-rich problem that will likely need lots of computational cycles. Mozilla’s Rust documentation specifically calls out the language as ideal for “game engines, operating systems, file systems, browser components and simulation engines for virtual reality.”

Under the hood

Rust is a bit of a hybrid, according to Mozilla’s Rust documentation. Rust offers developers the syntax advantages of high-level languages with the “control and performance of a low-level language,” the documentation explains.

Rust is a statically typed language rather than a dynamic one. Though developers like to argue the merits of both, Rust, like popular TypeScript, eliminates the frustration of “dynamic typing.” Data is constrained and checked by a compiler so confusion is minimized. Rust also makes it very hard to ignore errors – Steve Donovan, author of “A Gentle Guide to Rust,” jokes it can be hard not to think the compiler is shouting at you when you make a mistake.

Donovan identifies Rust’s key principles as:

  • Strictly enforcing safe borrowing of data
  • Functions, methods, and closures to operate on data
  • Tuples, structs, and enums to aggregate data
  • Pattern matching to select and destructure data
  • Traits to define behaviour on data

All of those guardrails lead to a language that can create fast-moving code with few things that slow it down. There’s no runtime or garbage collector making Rust ideal for applications where memory usage is at a premium (like embedded devices). But if there is a place where Rust really stands out, it’s security. Donovant points out that Rust is “safe by default,” unlike C or C++. No one can corrupt memory by default, he writes.

#rust #language