Fredy  Larson

Fredy Larson

1596493440

Flutter From Scratch, Episode 1: Installing Flutter and Configuring Android Studio

Have you ever wondered how to go from an idea to app with Flutter? In our new Flutter From Scratch video series Lewis Cianci shows the whole process.

From the overview episode you’ll find some of the topics that will be covered in the series. Everything from how to make an attractive looking app on Android Studio and architecting it correctly all the way to getting the configuration right on Codemagic CI/CD to ship your app to app stores.

Watch the Flutter From Scratch overview episode:

Episode 1: Installing Flutter and Configuring Android Studio

In our first episode, we look at how to install Flutter and Android Studio on a completely blank computer. After that we set up emulators and get our feet wet with Hot Reload.

  • 0:18 - Installing Development Tools
  • 2:03 - Installing Plugins
  • 5:23 - Configuring Emulators
  • 5:46 - Testing Hot Reload

Important links:

If you have any questions or something you definitely want to be covered in the upcoming episodes, let us know on the Codemagic Slack channel.

Be sure to subscribe to Codemagic Youtube channel to see our next episodes!


Lewis Cianci is a software developer in Brisbane, Australia. His first computer had a tape drive. He’s been developing software for at least ten years, and has used quite a few mobile development frameworks (like Ionic and Xamarin Forms) in his time. After converting to Flutter, though, he’s never going back. You can reach him at his blog, read about other non-fluttery things at Medium, or maybe catch a glimpse of him at your nearest and most fanciest coffee shop with him and his dear wife.

#flutter #android

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Flutter From Scratch, Episode 1: Installing Flutter and Configuring Android Studio

Google's Flutter 1.20 stable announced with new features - Navoki

Flutter Google cross-platform UI framework has released a new version 1.20 stable.

Flutter is Google’s UI framework to make apps for Android, iOS, Web, Windows, Mac, Linux, and Fuchsia OS. Since the last 2 years, the flutter Framework has already achieved popularity among mobile developers to develop Android and iOS apps. In the last few releases, Flutter also added the support of making web applications and desktop applications.

Last month they introduced the support of the Linux desktop app that can be distributed through Canonical Snap Store(Snapcraft), this enables the developers to publish there Linux desktop app for their users and publish on Snap Store.  If you want to learn how to Publish Flutter Desktop app in Snap Store that here is the tutorial.

Flutter 1.20 Framework is built on Google’s made Dart programming language that is a cross-platform language providing native performance, new UI widgets, and other more features for the developer usage.

Here are the few key points of this release:

Performance improvements for Flutter and Dart

In this release, they have got multiple performance improvements in the Dart language itself. A new improvement is to reduce the app size in the release versions of the app. Another performance improvement is to reduce junk in the display of app animation by using the warm-up phase.

sksl_warm-up

If your app is junk information during the first run then the Skia Shading Language shader provides for pre-compilation as part of your app’s build. This can speed it up by more than 2x.

Added a better support of mouse cursors for web and desktop flutter app,. Now many widgets will show cursor on top of them or you can specify the type of supported cursor you want.

Autofill for mobile text fields

Autofill was already supported in native applications now its been added to the Flutter SDK. Now prefilled information stored by your OS can be used for autofill in the application. This feature will be available soon on the flutter web.

flutter_autofill

A new widget for interaction

InteractiveViewer is a new widget design for common interactions in your app like pan, zoom drag and drop for resizing the widget. Informations on this you can check more on this API documentation where you can try this widget on the DartPad. In this release, drag-drop has more features added like you can know precisely where the drop happened and get the position.

Updated Material Slider, RangeSlider, TimePicker, and DatePicker

In this new release, there are many pre-existing widgets that were updated to match the latest material guidelines, these updates include better interaction with Slider and RangeSliderDatePicker with support for date range and time picker with the new style.

flutter_DatePicker

New pubspec.yaml format

Other than these widget updates there is some update within the project also like in pubspec.yaml file format. If you are a flutter plugin publisher then your old pubspec.yaml  is no longer supported to publish a plugin as the older format does not specify for which platform plugin you are making. All existing plugin will continue to work with flutter apps but you should make a plugin update as soon as possible.

Preview of embedded Dart DevTools in Visual Studio Code

Visual Studio code flutter extension got an update in this release. You get a preview of new features where you can analyze that Dev tools in your coding workspace. Enable this feature in your vs code by _dart.previewEmbeddedDevTools_setting. Dart DevTools menu you can choose your favorite page embed on your code workspace.

Network tracking

The updated the Dev tools comes with the network page that enables network profiling. You can track the timings and other information like status and content type of your** network calls** within your app. You can also monitor gRPC traffic.

Generate type-safe platform channels for platform interop

Pigeon is a command-line tool that will generate types of safe platform channels without adding additional dependencies. With this instead of manually matching method strings on platform channel and serializing arguments, you can invoke native class and pass nonprimitive data objects by directly calling the Dartmethod.

There is still a long list of updates in the new version of Flutter 1.2 that we cannot cover in this blog. You can get more details you can visit the official site to know more. Also, you can subscribe to the Navoki newsletter to get updates on these features and upcoming new updates and lessons. In upcoming new versions, we might see more new features and improvements.

You can get more free Flutter tutorials you can follow these courses:

#dart #developers #flutter #app developed #dart devtools in visual studio code #firebase local emulator suite in flutter #flutter autofill #flutter date picker #flutter desktop linux app build and publish on snapcraft store #flutter pigeon #flutter range slider #flutter slider #flutter time picker #flutter tutorial #flutter widget #google flutter #linux #navoki #pubspec format #setup flutter desktop on windows

Brain  Crist

Brain Crist

1595372400

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

1./ Install Android Studio Using APT

Method 1./ Install Android Studio Using APT

1- We need to add official repository to the sources list. Therefore, type the below command to add the Android Studio repository:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:maarten-fonville/android-studio

02- Now let’s install Android studio and all the software dependencies as below.

$ sudo apt update
$ sudo apt install android-studio

Method 2./ Install Android Studio Using snap

We can install using the snap tool. So, use the below command to install Android Studio:

$ sudo snap install android-studio --classic

2./ Starting Android Studio

01- You can start Android Studio either by typing the command android-studio in your terminal or by clicking on the Android Studio icon (Activities -> Android Studio).

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

02- When you start Android Studio for the first time, a window like the following will appear asking you to import Android Studio settings from a previous installation. However, if you have a previous installation of Android Studio, simply browse to the configuration folder. If not, go with the default option which is Do not import settings.

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

03- Click on the Next button, and you will be presented with a window to choose your type of setup you want for Android Studio. So, let’s choose Standard which will install the most common settings and options as below.

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

04- Click Next and you’ll be taken to the following window to choose your UI theme:

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

05- You’ll be taken to a window to verify your chosen settings. Simply click on Next. Finally, wait for the Wizard to download and install the required dependencies before you can start your first Android project

How to Install Android Studio on Ubuntu 20.04

#linux #ubuntu #install android studio #install android studio ubuntu #install sdk ubuntu #sdk #sdk install android studio #ubuntu install android studio

A Wrapper for Sembast and SQFlite to Enable Easy

FHIR_DB

This is really just a wrapper around Sembast_SQFLite - so all of the heavy lifting was done by Alex Tekartik. I highly recommend that if you have any questions about working with this package that you take a look at Sembast. He's also just a super nice guy, and even answered a question for me when I was deciding which sembast version to use. As usual, ResoCoder also has a good tutorial.

I have an interest in low-resource settings and thus a specific reason to be able to store data offline. To encourage this use, there are a number of other packages I have created based around the data format FHIR. FHIR® is the registered trademark of HL7 and is used with the permission of HL7. Use of the FHIR trademark does not constitute endorsement of this product by HL7.

Using the Db

So, while not absolutely necessary, I highly recommend that you use some sort of interface class. This adds the benefit of more easily handling errors, plus if you change to a different database in the future, you don't have to change the rest of your app, just the interface.

I've used something like this in my projects:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  Future<Either<DbFailure, Resource>> save(Resource resource) async {
    Resource resultResource;
    try {
      resultResource = await resourceDao.save(resource);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToSave(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultResource);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> returnListOfSingleResourceType(
      String resourceType) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.getAllSortedById(resourceType: resourceType);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }
}

I like this because in case there's an i/o error or something, it won't crash your app. Then, you can call this interface in your app like the following:

final patient = Patient(
    resourceType: 'Patient',
    name: [HumanName(text: 'New Patient Name')],
    birthDate: Date(DateTime.now()),
);

final saveResult = await IFhirDb().save(patient);

This will save your newly created patient to the locally embedded database.

IMPORTANT: this database will expect that all previously created resources have an id. When you save a resource, it will check to see if that resource type has already been stored. (Each resource type is saved in it's own store in the database). It will then check if there is an ID. If there's no ID, it will create a new one for that resource (along with metadata on version number and creation time). It will save it, and return the resource. If it already has an ID, it will copy the the old version of the resource into a _history store. It will then update the metadata of the new resource and save that version into the appropriate store for that resource. If, for instance, we have a previously created patient:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "1",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:41:28.054369Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Patient"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

And we update the last name to 'Provider'. The above version of the patient will be kept in _history, while in the 'Patient' store in the db, we will have the updated version:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "2",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:45:07.316698Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Provider"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

This way we can keep track of all previous version of all resources (which is obviously important in medicine).

For most of the interactions (saving, deleting, etc), they work the way you'd expect. The only difference is search. Because Sembast is NoSQL, we can search on any of the fields in a resource. If in our interface class, we have the following function:

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

You can search for all immunizations of a certain patient:

searchFunction(
        'Immunization', 'patient.reference', 'Patient/$patientId');

This function will search through all entries in the 'Immunization' store. It will look at all 'patient.reference' fields, and return any that match 'Patient/$patientId'.

The last thing I'll mention is that this is a password protected db, using AES-256 encryption (although it can also use Salsa20). Anytime you use the db, you have the option of using a password for encryption/decryption. Remember, if you setup the database using encryption, you will only be able to access it using that same password. When you're ready to change the password, you will need to call the update password function. If we again assume we created a change password method in our interface, it might look something like this:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();
  ...
    Future<Either<DbFailure, Unit>> updatePassword(String oldPassword, String newPassword) async {
    try {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(oldPassword, newPassword);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToUpdatePassword(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(Unit);
  }

You don't have to use a password, and in that case, it will save the db file as plain text. If you want to add a password later, it will encrypt it at that time.

General Store

After using this for a while in an app, I've realized that it needs to be able to store data apart from just FHIR resources, at least on occasion. For this, I've added a second class for all versions of the database called GeneralDao. This is similar to the ResourceDao, but fewer options. So, in order to save something, it would look like this:

await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'});
await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'}, 'key');

The difference between these two options is that the first one will generate a key for the map being stored, while the second will store the map using the key provided. Both will return the key after successfully storing the map.

Other functions available include:

// deletes everything in the general store
await GeneralDao().deleteAllGeneral('password'); 

// delete specific entry
await GeneralDao().delete('password','key'); 

// returns map with that key
await GeneralDao().find('password', 'key'); 

FHIR® is a registered trademark of Health Level Seven International (HL7) and its use does not constitute an endorsement of products by HL7®

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fhir_db

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fhir_db: ^0.4.3

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/aes.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/salsa.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/resource_dao.dart'; 

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:fhir/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:test/test.dart';

Future<void> main() async {
  WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();

  final resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  // await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
  await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

  group('Playing with passwords', () {
    test('Playing with Passwords', () async {
      final patient = Patient(id: Id('1'));

      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final search1 = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search1[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', 'newerPw');
      final search2 = await resourceDao.find('newerPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search2[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newerPw', null);
      final search3 = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search3[0]);

      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);
    });
  });

  final id = Id('12345');
  group('Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          null, null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 0);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Password - Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          'newPw', null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources('newPw');

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 0);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
    });
  });
} 

Download Details:

Author: MayJuun

Source Code: https://github.com/MayJuun/fhir/tree/main/fhir_db

#sqflite  #dart  #flutter 

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1593867420

Top Android Projects with Source Code

Android Projects with Source Code – Your entry pass into the world of Android

Hello Everyone, welcome to this article, which is going to be really important to all those who’re in dilemma for their projects and the project submissions. This article is also going to help you if you’re an enthusiast looking forward to explore and enhance your Android skills. The reason is that we’re here to provide you the best ideas of Android Project with source code that you can choose as per your choice.

These project ideas are simple suggestions to help you deal with the difficulty of choosing the correct projects. In this article, we’ll see the project ideas from beginners level and later we’ll move on to intermediate to advance.

top android projects with source code

Android Projects with Source Code

Before working on real-time projects, it is recommended to create a sample hello world project in android studio and get a flavor of project creation as well as execution: Create your first android project

Android Projects for beginners

1. Calculator

build a simple calculator app in android studio source code

Android Project: A calculator will be an easy application if you have just learned Android and coding for Java. This Application will simply take the input values and the operation to be performed from the users. After taking the input it’ll return the results to them on the screen. This is a really easy application and doesn’t need use of any particular package.

To make a calculator you’d need Android IDE, Kotlin/Java for coding, and for layout of your application, you’d need XML or JSON. For this, coding would be the same as that in any language, but in the form of an application. Not to forget creating a calculator initially will increase your logical thinking.

Once the user installs the calculator, they’re ready to use it even without the internet. They’ll enter the values, and the application will show them the value after performing the given operations on the entered operands.

Source Code: Simple Calculator Project

2. A Reminder App

Android Project: This is a good project for beginners. A Reminder App can help you set reminders for different events that you have throughout the day. It’ll help you stay updated with all your tasks for the day. It can be useful for all those who are not so good at organizing their plans and forget easily. This would be a simple application just whose task would be just to remind you of something at a particular time.

To make a Reminder App you need to code in Kotlin/Java and design the layout using XML or JSON. For the functionality of the app, you’d need to make use of AlarmManager Class and Notifications in Android.

In this, the user would be able to set reminders and time in the application. Users can schedule reminders that would remind them to drink water again and again throughout the day. Or to remind them of their medications.

3. Quiz Application

Android Project: Another beginner’s level project Idea can be a Quiz Application in android. Here you can provide the users with Quiz on various general knowledge topics. These practices will ensure that you’re able to set the layouts properly and slowly increase your pace of learning the Android application development. In this you’ll learn to use various Layout components at the same time understanding them better.

To make a quiz application you’ll need to code in Java and set layouts using xml or java whichever you prefer. You can also use JSON for the layouts whichever preferable.

In the app, questions would be asked and answers would be shown as multiple choices. The user selects the answer and gets shown on the screen if the answers are correct. In the end the final marks would be shown to the users.

4. Simple Tic-Tac-Toe

android project tic tac toe game app

Android Project: Tic-Tac-Toe is a nice game, I guess most of you all are well aware of it. This will be a game for two players. In this android game, users would be putting X and O in the given 9 parts of a box one by one. The first player to arrange X or O in an adjacent line of three wins.

To build this game, you’d need Java and XML for Android Studio. And simply apply the logic on that. This game will have a set of three matches. So, it’ll also have a scoreboard. This scoreboard will show the final result at the end of one complete set.

Upon entering the game they’ll enter their names. And that’s when the game begins. They’ll touch one of the empty boxes present there and get their turn one by one. At the end of the game, there would be a winner declared.

Source Code: Tic Tac Toe Game Project

5. Stopwatch

Android Project: A stopwatch is another simple android project idea that will work the same as a normal handheld timepiece that measures the time elapsed between its activation and deactivation. This application will have three buttons that are: start, stop, and hold.

This application would need to use Java and XML. For this application, we need to set the timer properly as it is initially set to milliseconds, and that should be converted to minutes and then hours properly. The users can use this application and all they’d need to do is, start the stopwatch and then stop it when they are done. They can also pause the timer and continue it again when they like.

6. To Do App

Android Project: This is another very simple project idea for you as a beginner. This application as the name suggests will be a To-Do list holding app. It’ll store the users schedules and their upcoming meetings or events. In this application, users will be enabled to write their important notes as well. To make it safe, provide a login page before the user can access it.

So, this app will have a login page, sign-up page, logout system, and the area to write their tasks, events, or important notes. You can build it in android studio using Java and XML at ease. Using XML you can build the user interface as user-friendly as you can. And to store the users’ data, you can use SQLite enabling the users to even delete the data permanently.

Now for users, they will sign up and get access to the write section. Here the users can note down the things and store them permanently. Users can also alter the data or delete them. Finally, they can logout and also, login again and again whenever they like.

7. Roman to decimal converter

Android Project: This app is aimed at the conversion of Roman numbers to their significant decimal number. It’ll help to check the meaning of the roman numbers. Moreover, it will be easy to develop and will help you get your hands on coding and Android.

You need to use Android Studio, Java for coding and XML for interface. The application will take input from the users and convert them to decimal. Once it converts the Roman no. into decimal, it will show the results on the screen.

The users are supposed to just enter the Roman Number and they’ll get the decimal values on the screen. This can be a good android project for final year students.

8. Virtual Dice Roller

Android Project: Well, coming to this part that is Virtual Dice or a random no. generator. It is another simple but interesting app for computer science students. The only task that it would need to do would be to generate a number randomly. This can help people who’re often confused between two or more things.

Using a simple random number generator you can actually create something as good as this. All you’d need to do is get you hands-on OnClick listeners. And a good layout would be cherry on the cake.

The user’s task would be to set the range of the numbers and then click on the roll button. And the app will show them a randomly generated number. Isn’t it interesting ? Try soon!

9. A Scientific Calculator App

Android Project: This application is very important for you as a beginner as it will let you use your logical thinking and improve your programming skills. This is a scientific calculator that will help the users to do various calculations at ease.

To make this application you’d need to use Android Studio. Here you’d need to use arithmetic logics for the calculations. The user would need to give input to the application that will be in terms of numbers. After that, the user will give the operator as an input. Then the Application will calculate and generate the result on the user screen.

10. SMS App

Android Project: An SMS app is another easy but effective idea. It will let you send the SMS to various no. just in the same way as you use the default messaging application in your phone. This project will help you with better understanding of SMSManager in Android.

For this application, you would need to implement Java class SMSManager in Android. For the Layout you can use XML or JSON. Implementing SMSManager into the app is an easy task, so you would love this.

The user would be provided with the facility to text to whichever number they wish also, they’d be able to choose the numbers from the contact list. Another thing would be the Textbox, where they’ll enter their message. Once the message is entered they can happily click on the send button.

#android tutorials #android application final year project #android mini projects #android project for beginners #android project ideas #android project ideas for beginners #android projects #android projects for students #android projects with source code #android topics list #intermediate android projects #real-time android projects

Terry  Tremblay

Terry Tremblay

1598396940

What is Flutter and why you should learn it?

Flutter is an open-source UI toolkit for mobile developers, so they can use it to build native-looking** Android and iOS** applications from the same code base for both platforms. Flutter is also working to make Flutter apps for Web, PWA (progressive Web-App) and Desktop platform (Windows,macOS,Linux).

flutter-mobile-desktop-web-embedded_min

Flutter was officially released in December 2018. Since then, it has gone a much stronger flutter community.

There has been much increase in flutter developers, flutter packages, youtube tutorials, blogs, flutter examples apps, official and private events, and more. Flutter is now on top software repos based and trending on GitHub.

Flutter meaning?

What is Flutter? this question comes to many new developer’s mind.

humming_bird_dart_flutter

Flutter means flying wings quickly, and lightly but obviously, this doesn’t apply in our SDK.

So Flutter was one of the companies that were acquired by **Google **for around $40 million. That company was based on providing gesture detection and recognition from a standard webcam. But later when the Flutter was going to release in alpha version for developer it’s name was Sky, but since Google already owned Flutter name, so they rename it to Flutter.

Where Flutter is used?

Flutter is used in many startup companies nowadays, and even some MNCs are also adopting Flutter as a mobile development framework. Many top famous companies are using their apps in Flutter. Some of them here are

Dream11

Dream11

NuBank

NuBank

Reflectly app

Reflectly app

Abbey Road Studios

Abbey Road Studios

and many more other apps. Mobile development companies also adopted Flutter as a service for their clients. Even I was one of them who developed flutter apps as a freelancer and later as an IT company for mobile apps.

Flutter as a service

#dart #flutter #uncategorized #flutter framework #flutter jobs #flutter language #flutter meaning #flutter meaning in hindi #google flutter #how does flutter work #what is flutter