Authlogic: A Simple Ruby Authentication Solution.

Authlogic

An unobtrusive ruby authentication library based on ActiveRecord.   

Sponsors

Timber Logging

Tail Authlogic users in your logs!

Documentation

VersionDocumentation
Unreleasedhttps://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/master/README.md
6.4.2https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v6.4.2/README.md
5.2.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v5.2.0/README.md
4.5.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v4.5.0/README.md
3.7.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v3.7.0/README.md
2.1.11https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v2.1.11/README.rdoc
1.4.3https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v1.4.3/README.rdoc

1. Introduction

1.a. Overview

Authlogic introduces a new type of model. You can have as many as you want, and name them whatever you want, just like your other models. In this example, we want to authenticate with our User model, which is inferred from the name:

class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
  # specify configuration here, such as:
  # logout_on_timeout true
  # ...many more options in the documentation
end

In a UserSessionsController, login the user by using it just like your other models:

UserSession.create(:login => "bjohnson", :password => "my password", :remember_me => true)

session = UserSession.new(:login => "bjohnson", :password => "my password", :remember_me => true)
session.save

# requires the authlogic-oid "add on" gem
UserSession.create(:openid_identifier => "identifier", :remember_me => true)

# skip authentication and log the user in directly, the true means "remember me"
UserSession.create(my_user_object, true)

The above handles the entire authentication process for you by:

  1. authenticating (i.e. validating the record)
  2. sets up the proper session values and cookies to persist the session (i.e. saving the record).

You can also log out (i.e. destroying the session):

session.destroy

After a session has been created, you can persist it (i.e. finding the record) across requests. Thus keeping the user logged in:

session = UserSession.find

To get all of the nice authentication functionality in your model just do this:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.my_config_option = my_value
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

It is also "smart" in the sense that if a login or username field is present it will use that to authenticate, if not it will look for an email field. This is all configurable, but for 99% of cases the above is all you will need to do.

You may specify how passwords are cryptographically hashed (or encrypted) by setting the Authlogic::CryptoProvider option:

c.crypto_provider = Authlogic::CryptoProviders::BCrypt

Also, sessions are automatically maintained. You can switch this on and off with configuration, but the following will automatically log a user in after a successful registration:

User.create(params[:user])

You can switch this on and off with the following configuration:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.log_in_after_create = false
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

Authlogic also updates the session when the user changes his/her password. You can also switch this on and off with the following configuration:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.log_in_after_password_change = false
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

Authlogic is very flexible, it has a strong public API and a plethora of hooks to allow you to modify behavior and extend it. Check out the helpful links below to dig deeper.

1.b. Reference Documentation

This README is just an introduction, but we also have reference documentation.

To use the reference documentation, you must understand how Authlogic's code is organized. There are 2 models, your Authlogic model and your ActiveRecord model:

  1. Authlogic::Session, your session models that extend Authlogic::Session::Base.
  2. Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic, which adds in functionality to your ActiveRecord model when you call acts_as_authentic.

1.c. Installation

To install Authlogic, add this to your Gemfile:

gem 'authlogic'

And run bundle install.

2. Rails

Let's walk through a typical rails setup. (Compatibility)

2.a.1 The users table

If you want to enable all the features of Authlogic, a migration to create a User model might look like this:

class CreateUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Email
      t.string    :email
      t.index     :email, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Login
      t.string    :login

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Password
      t.string    :crypted_password
      t.string    :password_salt

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::PersistenceToken
      t.string    :persistence_token
      t.index     :persistence_token, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::SingleAccessToken
      t.string    :single_access_token
      t.index     :single_access_token, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::PerishableToken
      t.string    :perishable_token
      t.index     :perishable_token, unique: true

      # See "Magic Columns" in Authlogic::Session::Base
      t.integer   :login_count, default: 0, null: false
      t.integer   :failed_login_count, default: 0, null: false
      t.datetime  :last_request_at
      t.datetime  :current_login_at
      t.datetime  :last_login_at
      t.string    :current_login_ip
      t.string    :last_login_ip

      # See "Magic States" in Authlogic::Session::Base
      t.boolean   :active, default: false
      t.boolean   :approved, default: false
      t.boolean   :confirmed, default: false

      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

In the User model,

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic

  # Validate email, login, and password as you see fit.
  #
  # Authlogic < 5 added these validation for you, making them a little awkward
  # to change. In 4.4.0, those automatic validations were deprecated. See
  # https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/master/doc/use_normal_rails_validation.md
  validates :email,
    format: {
      with: /@/,
      message: "should look like an email address."
    },
    length: { maximum: 100 },
    uniqueness: {
      case_sensitive: false,
      if: :will_save_change_to_email?
    }

  validates :login,
    format: {
      with: /\A[a-z0-9]+\z/,
      message: "should use only letters and numbers."
    },
    length: { within: 3..100 },
    uniqueness: {
      case_sensitive: false,
      if: :will_save_change_to_login?
    }

  validates :password,
    confirmation: { if: :require_password? },
    length: {
      minimum: 8,
      if: :require_password?
    }
  validates :password_confirmation,
    length: {
      minimum: 8,
      if: :require_password?
  }
end

2.a.2. UserSession model

And define a corresponding model in app/models/user_session.rb:

class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
end

2.b. Controller

Your sessions controller will look just like your other controllers.

class UserSessionsController < ApplicationController
  def new
    @user_session = UserSession.new
  end

  def create
    @user_session = UserSession.new(user_session_params.to_h)
    if @user_session.save
      redirect_to root_url
    else
      render :action => :new
    end
  end

  def destroy
    current_user_session.destroy
    redirect_to new_user_session_url
  end

  private

  def user_session_params
    params.require(:user_session).permit(:login, :password, :remember_me)
  end
end

As you can see, this fits nicely into the conventional controller methods.

2.b.1. Helper Methods

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  helper_method :current_user_session, :current_user

  private
    def current_user_session
      return @current_user_session if defined?(@current_user_session)
      @current_user_session = UserSession.find
    end

    def current_user
      return @current_user if defined?(@current_user)
      @current_user = current_user_session && current_user_session.user
    end
end

2.b.2. Routes

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  # ...
  resources :users
  resource :user_session
end

2.b.3. ActionController::API

Because ActionController::API does not include ActionController::Cookies metal and ActionDispatch::Cookies rack module, Therefore, our controller can not use the cookies method.

2.c. View

For example, in app/views/user_sessions/new.html.erb:

<%= form_for @user_session, url: user_session_url do |f| %>
  <% if @user_session.errors.any? %>
  <div id="error_explanation">
    <h2><%= pluralize(@user_session.errors.count, "error") %> prohibited:</h2>
    <ul>
      <% @user_session.errors.full_messages.each do |msg| %>
        <li><%= msg %></li>
      <% end %>
    </ul>
  </div>
  <% end %>
  <%= f.label :login %><br />
  <%= f.text_field :login %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.label :password %><br />
  <%= f.password_field :password %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.label :remember_me %><br />
  <%= f.check_box :remember_me %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.submit "Login" %>
<% end %>

2.d. CSRF Protection

Because Authlogic introduces its own methods for storing user sessions, the CSRF (Cross Site Request Forgery) protection that is built into Rails will not work out of the box.

No generally applicable mitigation by the authlogic library is possible, because the instance variable you use to store a reference to the user session in def current_user_session will not be known to authlogic.

You will need to override ActionController::Base#handle_unverified_request to do something appropriate to how your app handles user sessions, e.g.:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  ...
  protected

  def handle_unverified_request
    # raise an exception
    fail ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken
    # or destroy session, redirect
    if current_user_session
      current_user_session.destroy
    end
    redirect_to root_url
  end
end

2.e. SameSite Cookie Attribute

The SameSite attribute tells browsers when and how to fire cookies in first- or third-party situations. SameSite is used by a variety of browsers to identify whether or not to allow a cookie to be accessed.

Up until recently, the standard default value when SameSite was not explicitly defined was to allow cookies in both first- and third-party contexts. However, starting with Chrome 80+, the SameSite attribute will not default to Lax behavior meaning cookies will only be permitted in first-party contexts.

Authlogic can allow you to explicitly set the value of SameSite to one of: Lax, Strict, or None. Note that when setting SameSite to None, the secure flag must also be set (secure is the default in Authlogic).

Reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Headers/Set-Cookie#SameSite

3. Testing

See Authlogic::TestCase

4. Helpful links

5. Add-ons

If you create one of your own, please let us know about it so we can add it to this list. Or just fork the project, add your link, and send us a pull request.

6. Internals

Interested in how all of this all works? Think about an ActiveRecord model. A database connection must be established before you can use it. In the case of Authlogic, a controller connection must be established before you can use it. It uses that controller connection to modify cookies, the current session, login with HTTP basic, etc. It connects to the controller through a before filter that is automatically set in your controller which lets Authlogic know about the current controller object. Then Authlogic leverages that to do everything, it's a pretty simple design. Nothing crazy going on, Authlogic is just leveraging the tools your framework provides in the controller object.

7. Extending

7.a. Extending UserSession

Your UserSession is designed to be extended with callbacks.

Example: Custom logging.

# user_session.rb
class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
  after_persisting :my_custom_logging

  private

  def my_custom_logging
    Rails.logger.info(
      format(
        'After authentication attempt, user id is %d',
        record.send(record.class.primary_key)
      )
    )
  end
end

To learn more about available callbacks, see the "Callbacks" documentation in authlogic/session/base.rb.

90. Compatibility

Versionbranchrubyactiverecord
6.4.26-4-stable>= 2.4.0>= 5.2, < 7.1
5.25-2-stable>= 2.3.0>= 5.2, < 6.1
4.54-5-stable>= 2.3.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
4.34-3-stable>= 2.3.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
4.24-2-stable>= 2.2.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
33-stable>= 1.9.3>= 3.2, < 5.3
2rails2>= 1.9.3~> 2.3.0
1???

Under SemVer, changes to dependencies do not require a major release.

Intellectual Property

Copyright (c) 2012 Ben Johnson of Binary Logic, released under the MIT license


Author: binarylogic
Source code: https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic
License: MIT license

#ruby  #ruby-on-rails 

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Authlogic: A Simple Ruby Authentication Solution.

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Two-Factor Authentication (or 2FA as it often referred to) is an extra layer of security that is used to provide users an additional level of protection when securing access to an account.
Employing a 2FA mechanism is a vast improvement in security over the Singe-Factor Authentication method of simply employing a username and password. Using this method, accounts that have 2FA enabled, require the user to enter a one-time passcode that is generated by an external application. The 2FA passcode (usually a six-digit number) is required to be input into the passcode field before access is granted. The 2FA input is usually required directly after the username and password are entered by the client.

#tutorials #2fa #access #account security #authentication #authentication method #authentication token #cli #command line #cpanel #feature manager #google authenticator #one time password #otp #otp authentication #passcode #password #passwords #qr code #security #security code #security policy #security practices #single factor authentication #time-based one-time password #totp #two factor authentication #whm

Authlogic: A Simple Ruby Authentication Solution.

Authlogic

An unobtrusive ruby authentication library based on ActiveRecord.   

Sponsors

Timber Logging

Tail Authlogic users in your logs!

Documentation

VersionDocumentation
Unreleasedhttps://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/master/README.md
6.4.2https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v6.4.2/README.md
5.2.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v5.2.0/README.md
4.5.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v4.5.0/README.md
3.7.0https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v3.7.0/README.md
2.1.11https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v2.1.11/README.rdoc
1.4.3https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/v1.4.3/README.rdoc

1. Introduction

1.a. Overview

Authlogic introduces a new type of model. You can have as many as you want, and name them whatever you want, just like your other models. In this example, we want to authenticate with our User model, which is inferred from the name:

class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
  # specify configuration here, such as:
  # logout_on_timeout true
  # ...many more options in the documentation
end

In a UserSessionsController, login the user by using it just like your other models:

UserSession.create(:login => "bjohnson", :password => "my password", :remember_me => true)

session = UserSession.new(:login => "bjohnson", :password => "my password", :remember_me => true)
session.save

# requires the authlogic-oid "add on" gem
UserSession.create(:openid_identifier => "identifier", :remember_me => true)

# skip authentication and log the user in directly, the true means "remember me"
UserSession.create(my_user_object, true)

The above handles the entire authentication process for you by:

  1. authenticating (i.e. validating the record)
  2. sets up the proper session values and cookies to persist the session (i.e. saving the record).

You can also log out (i.e. destroying the session):

session.destroy

After a session has been created, you can persist it (i.e. finding the record) across requests. Thus keeping the user logged in:

session = UserSession.find

To get all of the nice authentication functionality in your model just do this:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.my_config_option = my_value
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

It is also "smart" in the sense that if a login or username field is present it will use that to authenticate, if not it will look for an email field. This is all configurable, but for 99% of cases the above is all you will need to do.

You may specify how passwords are cryptographically hashed (or encrypted) by setting the Authlogic::CryptoProvider option:

c.crypto_provider = Authlogic::CryptoProviders::BCrypt

Also, sessions are automatically maintained. You can switch this on and off with configuration, but the following will automatically log a user in after a successful registration:

User.create(params[:user])

You can switch this on and off with the following configuration:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.log_in_after_create = false
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

Authlogic also updates the session when the user changes his/her password. You can also switch this on and off with the following configuration:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic do |c|
    c.log_in_after_password_change = false
  end # the configuration block is optional
end

Authlogic is very flexible, it has a strong public API and a plethora of hooks to allow you to modify behavior and extend it. Check out the helpful links below to dig deeper.

1.b. Reference Documentation

This README is just an introduction, but we also have reference documentation.

To use the reference documentation, you must understand how Authlogic's code is organized. There are 2 models, your Authlogic model and your ActiveRecord model:

  1. Authlogic::Session, your session models that extend Authlogic::Session::Base.
  2. Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic, which adds in functionality to your ActiveRecord model when you call acts_as_authentic.

1.c. Installation

To install Authlogic, add this to your Gemfile:

gem 'authlogic'

And run bundle install.

2. Rails

Let's walk through a typical rails setup. (Compatibility)

2.a.1 The users table

If you want to enable all the features of Authlogic, a migration to create a User model might look like this:

class CreateUser < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Email
      t.string    :email
      t.index     :email, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Login
      t.string    :login

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::Password
      t.string    :crypted_password
      t.string    :password_salt

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::PersistenceToken
      t.string    :persistence_token
      t.index     :persistence_token, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::SingleAccessToken
      t.string    :single_access_token
      t.index     :single_access_token, unique: true

      # Authlogic::ActsAsAuthentic::PerishableToken
      t.string    :perishable_token
      t.index     :perishable_token, unique: true

      # See "Magic Columns" in Authlogic::Session::Base
      t.integer   :login_count, default: 0, null: false
      t.integer   :failed_login_count, default: 0, null: false
      t.datetime  :last_request_at
      t.datetime  :current_login_at
      t.datetime  :last_login_at
      t.string    :current_login_ip
      t.string    :last_login_ip

      # See "Magic States" in Authlogic::Session::Base
      t.boolean   :active, default: false
      t.boolean   :approved, default: false
      t.boolean   :confirmed, default: false

      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

In the User model,

class User < ApplicationRecord
  acts_as_authentic

  # Validate email, login, and password as you see fit.
  #
  # Authlogic < 5 added these validation for you, making them a little awkward
  # to change. In 4.4.0, those automatic validations were deprecated. See
  # https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic/blob/master/doc/use_normal_rails_validation.md
  validates :email,
    format: {
      with: /@/,
      message: "should look like an email address."
    },
    length: { maximum: 100 },
    uniqueness: {
      case_sensitive: false,
      if: :will_save_change_to_email?
    }

  validates :login,
    format: {
      with: /\A[a-z0-9]+\z/,
      message: "should use only letters and numbers."
    },
    length: { within: 3..100 },
    uniqueness: {
      case_sensitive: false,
      if: :will_save_change_to_login?
    }

  validates :password,
    confirmation: { if: :require_password? },
    length: {
      minimum: 8,
      if: :require_password?
    }
  validates :password_confirmation,
    length: {
      minimum: 8,
      if: :require_password?
  }
end

2.a.2. UserSession model

And define a corresponding model in app/models/user_session.rb:

class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
end

2.b. Controller

Your sessions controller will look just like your other controllers.

class UserSessionsController < ApplicationController
  def new
    @user_session = UserSession.new
  end

  def create
    @user_session = UserSession.new(user_session_params.to_h)
    if @user_session.save
      redirect_to root_url
    else
      render :action => :new
    end
  end

  def destroy
    current_user_session.destroy
    redirect_to new_user_session_url
  end

  private

  def user_session_params
    params.require(:user_session).permit(:login, :password, :remember_me)
  end
end

As you can see, this fits nicely into the conventional controller methods.

2.b.1. Helper Methods

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  helper_method :current_user_session, :current_user

  private
    def current_user_session
      return @current_user_session if defined?(@current_user_session)
      @current_user_session = UserSession.find
    end

    def current_user
      return @current_user if defined?(@current_user)
      @current_user = current_user_session && current_user_session.user
    end
end

2.b.2. Routes

Rails.application.routes.draw do
  # ...
  resources :users
  resource :user_session
end

2.b.3. ActionController::API

Because ActionController::API does not include ActionController::Cookies metal and ActionDispatch::Cookies rack module, Therefore, our controller can not use the cookies method.

2.c. View

For example, in app/views/user_sessions/new.html.erb:

<%= form_for @user_session, url: user_session_url do |f| %>
  <% if @user_session.errors.any? %>
  <div id="error_explanation">
    <h2><%= pluralize(@user_session.errors.count, "error") %> prohibited:</h2>
    <ul>
      <% @user_session.errors.full_messages.each do |msg| %>
        <li><%= msg %></li>
      <% end %>
    </ul>
  </div>
  <% end %>
  <%= f.label :login %><br />
  <%= f.text_field :login %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.label :password %><br />
  <%= f.password_field :password %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.label :remember_me %><br />
  <%= f.check_box :remember_me %><br />
  <br />
  <%= f.submit "Login" %>
<% end %>

2.d. CSRF Protection

Because Authlogic introduces its own methods for storing user sessions, the CSRF (Cross Site Request Forgery) protection that is built into Rails will not work out of the box.

No generally applicable mitigation by the authlogic library is possible, because the instance variable you use to store a reference to the user session in def current_user_session will not be known to authlogic.

You will need to override ActionController::Base#handle_unverified_request to do something appropriate to how your app handles user sessions, e.g.:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  ...
  protected

  def handle_unverified_request
    # raise an exception
    fail ActionController::InvalidAuthenticityToken
    # or destroy session, redirect
    if current_user_session
      current_user_session.destroy
    end
    redirect_to root_url
  end
end

2.e. SameSite Cookie Attribute

The SameSite attribute tells browsers when and how to fire cookies in first- or third-party situations. SameSite is used by a variety of browsers to identify whether or not to allow a cookie to be accessed.

Up until recently, the standard default value when SameSite was not explicitly defined was to allow cookies in both first- and third-party contexts. However, starting with Chrome 80+, the SameSite attribute will not default to Lax behavior meaning cookies will only be permitted in first-party contexts.

Authlogic can allow you to explicitly set the value of SameSite to one of: Lax, Strict, or None. Note that when setting SameSite to None, the secure flag must also be set (secure is the default in Authlogic).

Reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Headers/Set-Cookie#SameSite

3. Testing

See Authlogic::TestCase

4. Helpful links

5. Add-ons

If you create one of your own, please let us know about it so we can add it to this list. Or just fork the project, add your link, and send us a pull request.

6. Internals

Interested in how all of this all works? Think about an ActiveRecord model. A database connection must be established before you can use it. In the case of Authlogic, a controller connection must be established before you can use it. It uses that controller connection to modify cookies, the current session, login with HTTP basic, etc. It connects to the controller through a before filter that is automatically set in your controller which lets Authlogic know about the current controller object. Then Authlogic leverages that to do everything, it's a pretty simple design. Nothing crazy going on, Authlogic is just leveraging the tools your framework provides in the controller object.

7. Extending

7.a. Extending UserSession

Your UserSession is designed to be extended with callbacks.

Example: Custom logging.

# user_session.rb
class UserSession < Authlogic::Session::Base
  after_persisting :my_custom_logging

  private

  def my_custom_logging
    Rails.logger.info(
      format(
        'After authentication attempt, user id is %d',
        record.send(record.class.primary_key)
      )
    )
  end
end

To learn more about available callbacks, see the "Callbacks" documentation in authlogic/session/base.rb.

90. Compatibility

Versionbranchrubyactiverecord
6.4.26-4-stable>= 2.4.0>= 5.2, < 7.1
5.25-2-stable>= 2.3.0>= 5.2, < 6.1
4.54-5-stable>= 2.3.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
4.34-3-stable>= 2.3.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
4.24-2-stable>= 2.2.0>= 4.2, < 5.3
33-stable>= 1.9.3>= 3.2, < 5.3
2rails2>= 1.9.3~> 2.3.0
1???

Under SemVer, changes to dependencies do not require a major release.

Intellectual Property

Copyright (c) 2012 Ben Johnson of Binary Logic, released under the MIT license


Author: binarylogic
Source code: https://github.com/binarylogic/authlogic
License: MIT license

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Ruby on Rails Development Services | Ruby on Rails Development

Ruby on Rails is a development tool that offers Web & Mobile App Developers a structure for all the codes they write resulting in time-saving with all the common repetitive tasks during the development stage.

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Latest Technology Solution Development - WebClues Infotech

Latest IT Tech Solution Development Company

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7 Reasons to Trust Ruby on Rails

Ruby on Rails is an amazing web development framework. Known for its adaptability, it powers 3,903,258 sites internationally. Ruby on Rails development speeds up the interaction within web applications. It is productive to such an extent that a Ruby on Rails developer can develop an application 25% to 40% quicker when contrasted with different frameworks. 

Around 2.1% (21,034) of the best 1 million sites utilize Ruby on Rails. The framework is perfect for creating web applications in every industry. Regardless of whether it's medical services or vehicles, Rails carries a higher degree of dynamism to each application. 

Be that as it may, what makes the framework so mainstream? Some say that it is affordable, some say it is on the grounds that the Ruby on Rails improvement environment is simple and basic. There are numerous reasons that make it ideal for creating dynamic applications.

Read more: Best Ruby on Rails projects Examples

7 reasons Ruby on Rails is preferred

There are a few other well-known backend services for web applications like Django, Flask, Laravel, and that's only the tip of the iceberg. So for what reason should organizations pick Ruby on Rails application development? We believe the accompanying reasons will feature why different organizations trust the framework -

Quick prototyping 

Rails works on building MVPs in a couple of months. Organizations incline toward Ruby on Rails quick application development as it offers them more opportunity to showcase the elements. Regular development groups accomplish 25% to 40% higher efficiency when working with Rails. Joined with agile, Ruby on Rails empowers timely delivery.

Basic and simple 

Ruby on Rails is easy to arrange and work with. It is not difficult to learn also. Both of these things are conceivable as a result of Ruby. The programming language has one of the most straightforward sentence structures, which is like the English language. Ruby is a universally useful programming language, working on things for web applications. 

Cost-effective 

Probably the greatest advantage of Rails is that it is very reasonable. The system is open-source, which implies there is no licensing charge included. Aside from that, engineers are additionally effectively accessible, that too at a lower cost. There are a large number of Ruby on Rails engineers for hire at an average compensation of $107,381 each year. 

Startup-friendly

Ruby on Rails is regularly known as "the startup technology." It offers adaptable, fast, and dynamic web improvement to new companies. Most arising organizations and new businesses lean toward this as a direct result of its quick application improvement capacities. It prompts quicker MVP development, which permits new companies to rapidly search for venture investment. 

Adaptable framework 

Ruby on Rails is profoundly adaptable and versatile. In any event, when engineers miss adding any functions, they can utilize different modules to add highlights into the application. Aside from that, they can likewise reclassify components by eliminating or adding them during the development environment. Indeed, even individual projects can be extended and changed. 

Convention over configuration

Regardless of whether it's Ruby on Rails enterprise application development or ecommerce-centered applications, the system utilizes convention over configuration. Developers don't have to go through hours attempting to set up the Ruby on Rails improvement environment. The standard conventions cover everything, improving on things for engineers on the task. The framework likewise utilizes the standard of "Don't Repeat Yourself" to guarantee there are no redundancies. 

Versatile applications 

At the point when organizations scale, applications regularly slack. However, this isn't the situation with Ruby on Rails web application development. The system powers sites with high traffic, It can deal with a huge load of worker demands immediately. Adaptability empowers new businesses to keep utilizing the structure even after they prepare their first model for dispatch. 

Checkout Pros and Cons of Ruby on Rails for Web Development

Bottom Line 

Ruby on Rails is as yet a significant framework utilized by organizations all over the world - of every kind. In this day and age, it is probably the best framework to digitize endeavors through powerful web applications.

A software development company provides comprehensive Ruby on Rails development to guarantee startups and MNCs can benefit as much as possible from their digital application needs. 

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