Edureka Fan

Edureka Fan

1624901100

Build a Pipeline on Microsoft Azure | Azure DevOps Tutorial For Beginners

🔥Azure Certification: https://www.edureka.co/microsoft-certified-azure-solution-architect-certification-training
This Edureka live video on “Build a CI CD Pipeline on Azure” will give you a brief introduction on how you can implement DevOps practices on Microsoft Azure.

#azure #microsoft

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Build a Pipeline on Microsoft Azure | Azure DevOps Tutorial For Beginners
Nabunya  Jane

Nabunya Jane

1624939448

A side-by-side comparison of Azure DevOps and GitHub

Collaboration is a crucial element in software development; having the right collaboration tools can make a difference and boost the entire team’s productivity. Microsoft introduced its Application Lifecycle Management product with Team Foundation Server (aka TFS) on March 16th, 2006. This software had to be installed on a server within your network and had a user-based license. To reduce the complexity of setting up and maintaining the server, Microsoft released Visual Studio Online–an Azure-based, server-hosted version of TFS. Microsoft manages and administers the servers as well as taking care of backups. To clarify its commitment to agile and DevOps, Microsoft rebranded Visual Studio Online in 2015 as Visual Studio Team Services and later as Azure DevOps in 2018.

Since its beginning, this platform has changed significantly. For example, it introduced a customizable, task-based build service, release gates, and much more. Many organizations across the world made a significant investment to run their businesses on Azure DevOps. For this reason, after Microsoft announced the acquisition of GitHub in mid-2018, GitHub announced its automated workflow system, which is much like Azure Pipelines. It’s called GitHub Actions. Due to the switch, some companies became afraid of having to migrate their practices again. In the past few months, I have gotten several questions about whether it is still worth starting new projects on Azure DevOps, especially after the release of features like GitHub Advanced Security and GitHub Codespaces (similar to Visual Studio Codespaces). In this article, I’ll clarify the differences between these two platforms, and I’ll give you some advice on how you should be using them to your advantage.

Data Residency

To meet the needs of companies that want to keep their data within their network, both GitHub and Azure DevOps provide a server version of their platform. GitHub version is called GitHub Enterprise Server, and the Azure DevOps version is called Azure DevOps Server. Both versions require the client to install and maintain both software and machine.

On the other hand, there is a critical difference between their cloud-hosted version. While Azure DevOps Service allows you to choose the Azure region, which is closes to your organization’s location, to decrease the eventuality of networking latency during the creation of your organization (collection of projects). GitHub doesn’t provide this feature.

Project management and bug tracking

GitHub

At the core of GitHub project management, we can find the issues. This task can be used to track any work item, from feature to bugs, and can be sorted into a Kanban-style board for easy consultation. The issue’s description also supports markdown syntax. Adding a specific keyword #issue-number (ex: #3) can associate the issue with another one. Each issue can be assigned to multiple developers, be linked to pull requests, and have various labels assigned to it. One can link a pull request to an issue to show that a fix is in progress and automatically close the issue when someone merges the pull request.

GitHub Kanban board

  • Lastly, multiple issues can be grouped into milestones that will give immediate feedback about the completion percentage. Milestones can also include a due date.

#azure-devops #microsoft #azure #github #azure devops #azure devops and github

Azure DevOps Tutorial for Beginners - Day1 | AZ- 400 | Azure DevOps Full Course...

Azure DevOps Tutorial for Beginners

Welcome to this Day-1 demo session on Introduction to Azure DevOps by Sandeep Soni (Azure DevOps Expert)

This is just the first session of a complete live training on Azure DevOps (AZ-400).
To enroll for complete training, visit - https://www.bestdotnettraining.com/payment-webinar/37

👉🏼 Complete Training: https://www.bestdotnettraining.com/azure-devops-online-training
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► Introduction to DevOps
► About Azure DevOps and its features
► Setup Azure DevOps

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#azure devops #azure devops tutorial #azure

Noah  Rowe

Noah Rowe

1595494080

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Multi-Stage Pipelines

The last couple of posts have been dealing with Release managed from the Releases area under Azure Pipelines. This week we are going to take what we were doing in that separate area of Azure DevOps and instead make it part of the YAML that currently builds our application. If you need some background on how the project got to this point check out the following posts.

Getting Started with Azure DevOps

Pipeline Creation in Azure DevOps

Azure DevOps Publish Artifacts for ASP.NET Core

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Multiple Jobs in YAML

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Reusable YAML

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Use YAML Across Repos

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Conditionals in YAML

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Naming and Tagging

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Manual Tagging

Azure DevOps Pipelines: Depends On with Conditionals in YAML

Azure DevOps Pipelines: PowerShell Task

Azure DevOps Releases: Auto Create New Release After Pipeline Build

Azure DevOps Releases: Auto Create Release with Pull Requests

Image for post

Recap

The current setup we have uses a YAML based Azure Pipeline to build a couple of ASP.NET Core web applications. Then on the Release side, we have basically a dummy release that doesn’t actually do anything but served as a demo of how to configure a continuous deployment type release. The following is the current YAML for our Pipeline for reference.

name: $(SourceBranchName)_$(date:yyyyMMdd)$(rev:.r)

resources:      
  repositories: 
  - repository: Shared
    name: Playground/Shared
    type: git 
    ref: master #branch name

trigger: none

variables:
  buildConfiguration: 'Release'

jobs:
- job: WebApp1
  displayName: 'Build WebApp1'
  pool:
    vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

  steps:
  - task: PowerShell@2
    inputs:
      targetType: 'inline'
      script: 'Get-ChildItem -Path Env:\'

  - template: buildCoreWebProject.yml@Shared
    parameters:
      buildConFiguration: $(buildConfiguration)
      project: WebApp1.csproj
      artifactName: WebApp1

- job: WebApp2
  displayName: 'Build WebApp2'
  condition: and(succeeded(), eq(variables['BuildWebApp2'], 'true'))
  pool:
    vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

  steps:
  - template: build.yml
    parameters:
      buildConFiguration: $(buildConfiguration)
      project: WebApp2.csproj
      artifactName: WebApp2

- job: DependentJob
  displayName: 'Build Dependent Job'
  pool:
    vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

  dependsOn:
  - WebApp1
  - WebApp2

  steps:
  - template: buildCoreWebProject.yml@Shared
    parameters:
      buildConFiguration: $(buildConfiguration)
      project: WebApp1.csproj
      artifactName: WebApp1Again

- job: TagSources
  displayName: 'Tag Sources'
  pool:
    vmImage: 'ubuntu-latest'

  dependsOn:
  - WebApp1
  - WebApp2
  - DependentJob
  condition: |
    and
    (
      eq(dependencies.WebApp1.result, 'Succeeded'),
      in(dependencies.WebApp2.result, 'Succeeded', 'Skipped'),
      in(dependencies.DependentJob.result, 'Succeeded', 'Skipped')
    )

  steps:
  - checkout: self
    persistCredentials: true
    clean: true
    fetchDepth: 1

  - task: PowerShell@2
    inputs:
      targetType: 'inline'
      script: |
        $env:GIT_REDIRECT_STDERR` = '2>&1'
        $tag = "manual_$(Build.BuildNumber)".replace(' ', '_')
        git tag $tag
        Write-Host "Successfully created tag $tag" 

        git push --tags
         Write-Host "Successfully pushed tag $tag"     

      failOnStderr: false

#azure-pipelines #azure #azure-devops #devops

Aayush Singh

Aayush Singh

1614345154

Azure Tutorial | Azure Tutorial For Beginners | Learn Azure | Intellipaat

Azure tutorial

You will learn what is cloud computing, what is azure, how to create an Azure account, various azure services, azure CLI, azure virtual machine, what is azure app services along with hands-on demo and interview questions and answers. This is a must-watch session for everyone who wishes to learn azure from and make a career in it.

Who should watch this Microsoft Azure video?

If you want to learn Azure to become Solutions architects & programmers looking to build SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS applications then this Intellipaat windows azure certification is for you. The Intellipaat Azure video is your first step to learn Azure. Since this Microsoft Azure certification video can be taken by anybody, so if you are a Network and Systems administrator or Graduates and professionals looking to upgrade the skills to cloud technologies or Storage and security admins, Virtualization & network engineers then you can also watch this Azure certification video.

Why should you opt for an Azure career?

If you want to fast-track your career then you should strongly consider Azure. Cloud computing and cloud infrastructure are today some of the most powerful shifts that are happening in organizations around the world that want to benefit from its strengths like low cost, instant availability and high reliability. The Intellipaat industry-designed Microsoft Azure training is for those looking to make a solid career in the Microsoft Azure domain and become a Microsoft Azure certified professional. The salaries for Azure professionals are very good. Hence this Intellipaat azure video is your stepping stone to a successful career!

#azure tutorial #azure tutorial for beginners #learn azure

Automating deployments to on premise servers with Azure DevOps

As someone who has spent most of their (very short) career doing one click cloud resource deployments, I was shocked when I jumped onto a legacy project and realised the complexity of the deployment process to staging and production. Using a traditional .NET Framework application stack, the deployment process consisted of the following steps:

  1. Set the configuration target in Visual Studio to release
  2. Build the project
  3. Copy the .dlls using a USB to a client laptop which was configured for VPN access
  4. Copy the .dlls via RDP to the target server
  5. Go into IIS Manager and point the file path to the new version of the application

As you can see and may have experienced, this is a long, slow and error-prone process which can often take over an hour given likelihood of one of those steps not working correctly. For me it was also a real pain point having to use the client laptop, as it had 3 different passwords to get in, none of which I set or could remember. It also meant if we needed to do a deployment I had to be in the office to physically use the laptop — no working from home that day.

My first step was to automate the build process. If we could get Azure Pipelines to at least build the project, I could download the files and copy them over manually. There are plenty of guides online on how to set this up, but the final result meant it gave me a .zip artifact of all the files required for the project. This also took away a common hotspot for errors, which was building locally on my machine. This also meant regardless of who wrote the code, the build process was always identical.

The second step was to** set up a release pipeline**. Within Azure Pipelines, what we wanted to do was create a deployment group, and then register the server we want to deploy to as a target within that deployment group. This will allow us to deploy directly to an on premise server. So, how do we do this?

Requirements:

  • PowerShell 3.0 or higher. On our Windows Server 2003 box, we needed to upgrade from PowerShell 2.0. This is a simple download, install and restart.
  • .NET Framework x64 4.5 or higher

Steps:

  1. Navigate to Deployment Groups under Pipelines in Azure DevOps:

Image for post

Deployment groups menu item in Azure DevOps > Pipelines

2. Create a new deployment group. The idea is you can have several servers that are in the same group and deploy the code to all of them simultaneously (for example for load balancing reasons). In my case I only have one target in my deployment group, so the idea of a group is a bit redundant.

#azure #azure-pipelines #deployment-pipelines #windows-server #azure-devops #devops