Haylie  Conn

Haylie Conn

1627008888

AWS ECR: Push Docker Image

Learn how to create a Docker image, Create AWS ECR repo, configure AWS credentials and push the Docker image to AWS ECR.

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to push the Docker image from the local computer to AWS ECR(Elastic Container Registry). And how to run the containers using AWS ECR. If you created a Docker image and want to create a container using the image anywhere, then the image needs to be in the cloud repository. There are many providers available for Docker Image Repository. In this tutorial, we are going to see the AWS ECR.

We always create a private repository for the Docker images in real-time projects. You can create public repo also for testing purposes. AWS ECR private repo is free until 500 MB. If the memory exceeds 500 MB, you are charged $0.10/GB.

In this article, we are going to see the following topics.

1. Build Docker image locally.
2. Create Repo in AWS ECR.
3. Configure AWS Credentials locally.
4. Tag Docker Image for AWS ECR.
5. Push Docker Image to AWS ECR.
6. Create Docker container using AWS ECR image.

#docker #aws-ecr

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

AWS ECR: Push Docker Image

How to Push Docker Image to AWS ECR | Create and Push Docker Image to AWS ECR

In this Video, Creating Node.js Application, Install Docker on Ubuntu using APT Repo, Install AWS CLI on Ubuntu, Creating ECR Repository in AWS, How to push Docker Image to AWS ECR.

Prerequisites

  • Ubuntu 16/18/20.04 LTS

  • SSH access with sudo privileges

  • Firewall Port: 3000

  • Step #1: Creating Node.js Application

  • Step #2: Install Docker and Create Docker Image

  • Step #3: Install AWS CLI on Ubuntu

  • Step #4: Creating ECR Repository in AWS

  • Step #5: push Docker Image to AWS ECR

Follow below article for all steps.
https://www.devopshint.com/how-to-push-docker-image-to-aws-ecr/

#node #docker #ubuntu #aws

Adnan Malik

1604372986

Serverless Containers With AWS Fargate and Docker

In AWS there are a few services which seem similar or related when it comes to containerisation. They do have their nuances so let’s begin with an introduction of what these are and their similarities and differences (according to the AWS documentation)

Elastic Container Service (ECS)

  • Fully managed container orchestration service
  • Manages the lifecycle and placement of tasks comprised of one or more containers that work together
  • Does not run or execute your container(s)
  • Containers run using ECS Container Instances (normal EC2 instances with ECS Container Agent) or Fargate
  • ECS Container Agent regularly polls the ECS API to manage state
  • Cluster of container instances run in an auto-scaling group
  • You** manage your own EC2 instance, patching and scaling**
  • ECS is free but pricing is per running EC2 instance
  • Offers integration with Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
  • Supports Application Load Balancer (ALB), the Network Load Balancer (NLB) and Classic Load Balancer (CLB)
  • Load balancing is efficient
  • Each task has its own Elastic Network Interface (ENI)
  • Supports IAM roles for tasks
  • AWS proprietary

#aws-fargate #aws-ecr #docker #aws-ecs #aws-eks

Haylie  Conn

Haylie Conn

1627008888

AWS ECR: Push Docker Image

Learn how to create a Docker image, Create AWS ECR repo, configure AWS credentials and push the Docker image to AWS ECR.

In this tutorial, we are going to see how to push the Docker image from the local computer to AWS ECR(Elastic Container Registry). And how to run the containers using AWS ECR. If you created a Docker image and want to create a container using the image anywhere, then the image needs to be in the cloud repository. There are many providers available for Docker Image Repository. In this tutorial, we are going to see the AWS ECR.

We always create a private repository for the Docker images in real-time projects. You can create public repo also for testing purposes. AWS ECR private repo is free until 500 MB. If the memory exceeds 500 MB, you are charged $0.10/GB.

In this article, we are going to see the following topics.

1. Build Docker image locally.
2. Create Repo in AWS ECR.
3. Configure AWS Credentials locally.
4. Tag Docker Image for AWS ECR.
5. Push Docker Image to AWS ECR.
6. Create Docker container using AWS ECR image.

#docker #aws-ecr

Docker manifest - A peek into image's manifest.json files

docker manifest – An experimental feature !

The image manifest provides a configuration and a set of layers for a container image.

This is an experimental feature. To enable this feature in the Docker CLI, one can edit the config.json file found in ~/.docker/config.json like :

{
        "auths": {
                "https://index.docker.io/v1/": {
                        "auth": "XXXXXXX"
                }
        },
        "HttpHeaders": {
                "User-Agent": "Docker-Client/19.03.8 (linux)"
        },
        "experimental": "enabled",
        "debug": true
}

What is ‘docker manifest’ ?

The docker manifest command does not work independently to perform any action. In order to work with the docker manifest or manifest list, we use sub-commands along with it. This manifest sub-command can enable us to interact with the image manifests. Furthermore, it also gives information about the OS and the architecture, that a particular image was built for.

A single manifest comprises of information about an image, it’s size, the layers and digest.

A manifest list is a list of image layers (manifests) that are, created by specifying one or more image names. It can then be used in the same way as an image name in docker pull and docker run commands.

Commands to get started with :

After enabling this feature, one would be able to access the following command :

docker-manifest-enter image description here

These commands are easy to use. It basically avoids the need for pulling and running and then testing the images locally, from a docker registry.

Next, to inspect an image manifest, follow this syntax,

 docker manifest inspect image-name

enter image description here

.

#devops #docker #devops #docker #docker learning #docker-image

Alex Tyler

Alex Tyler

1595297397

Automatically Scan Your Docker Images for Vulnerabilities with AWS ECR

When using Docker to run applications, security is a major concern, but it can sometimes be easy to forget as we focus first on functionality. This doesn’t need to be the case, as AWS Elastic Container Registry (ECR) can now be setup to automatically scan images on push, and provide feedback on any vulnerabilities that need to be addressed.

How Does ECR Image Scanning Work?

ECR uses the Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVEs) database from the open-source Clair project. Clair performs static scanning of Docker images, meaning that it happens prior to deployment, as opposed to _dynamic scanning, _which happens at runtime.

Clair analyzes each layer of the Docker image and then returns vulnerabilities that might affect the image. These vulnerabilities are then shown to us in the AWS Console or we can fetch them via the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI).

AWS CLI workflow

Additionally, ECR offers these features:

  • Automatically scan on pushing an image to ECR.
  • An event is sent to AWS EventBridge when an image scan completes, allowing for further process automation.

Scanning Images With ECR: Hands-On

Let’s start off by scanning everyone’s favorite base image, Alpine Linux. It’s a lightweight Linux distribution that is used as a base image for many popular applications in Docker. It’s also one of the official approved Docker images. ✅

At the time of writing version 3.11 of Alpine, it was not compatible with ECR image scanning, so we’ll use version 3.10.

#docker #aws #kubernetes #secuirty #ecr