3 CSS Tricks You Must Know 2021

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3 CSS Tricks You Must Know 2021
Veronica  Roob

Veronica Roob

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A Pure PHP Implementation Of The MessagePack Serialization Format

msgpack.php

A pure PHP implementation of the MessagePack serialization format.

Features

Installation

The recommended way to install the library is through Composer:

composer require rybakit/msgpack

Usage

Packing

To pack values you can either use an instance of a Packer:

$packer = new Packer();
$packed = $packer->pack($value);

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$packed = MessagePack::pack($value);

In the examples above, the method pack automatically packs a value depending on its type. However, not all PHP types can be uniquely translated to MessagePack types. For example, the MessagePack format defines map and array types, which are represented by a single array type in PHP. By default, the packer will pack a PHP array as a MessagePack array if it has sequential numeric keys, starting from 0 and as a MessagePack map otherwise:

$mpArr1 = $packer->pack([1, 2]);               // MP array [1, 2]
$mpArr2 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 1 => 2]);     // MP array [1, 2]
$mpMap1 = $packer->pack([0 => 1, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {0: 1, 2: 3}
$mpMap2 = $packer->pack([1 => 2, 2 => 3]);     // MP map {1: 2, 2: 3}
$mpMap3 = $packer->pack(['a' => 1, 'b' => 2]); // MP map {a: 1, b: 2}

However, sometimes you need to pack a sequential array as a MessagePack map. To do this, use the packMap method:

$mpMap = $packer->packMap([1, 2]); // {0: 1, 1: 2}

Here is a list of type-specific packing methods:

$packer->packNil();           // MP nil
$packer->packBool(true);      // MP bool
$packer->packInt(42);         // MP int
$packer->packFloat(M_PI);     // MP float (32 or 64)
$packer->packFloat32(M_PI);   // MP float 32
$packer->packFloat64(M_PI);   // MP float 64
$packer->packStr('foo');      // MP str
$packer->packBin("\x80");     // MP bin
$packer->packArray([1, 2]);   // MP array
$packer->packMap(['a' => 1]); // MP map
$packer->packExt(1, "\xaa");  // MP ext

Check the "Custom types" section below on how to pack custom types.

Packing options

The Packer object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the packing process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
FORCE_STRForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack UTF-8 strings
FORCE_BINForces PHP strings to be packed as MessagePack binary data
DETECT_STR_BINDetects MessagePack str/bin type automatically
  
FORCE_ARRForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack arrays
FORCE_MAPForces PHP arrays to be packed as MessagePack maps
DETECT_ARR_MAPDetects MessagePack array/map type automatically
  
FORCE_FLOAT32Forces PHP floats to be packed as 32-bits MessagePack floats
FORCE_FLOAT64Forces PHP floats to be packed as 64-bits MessagePack floats

The type detection mode (DETECT_STR_BIN/DETECT_ARR_MAP) adds some overhead which can be noticed when you pack large (16- and 32-bit) arrays or strings. However, if you know the value type in advance (for example, you only work with UTF-8 strings or/and associative arrays), you can eliminate this overhead by forcing the packer to use the appropriate type, which will save it from running the auto-detection routine. Another option is to explicitly specify the value type. The library provides 2 auxiliary classes for this, Map and Bin. Check the "Custom types" section below for details.

Examples:

// detect str/bin type and pack PHP 64-bit floats (doubles) to MP 32-bit floats
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::DETECT_STR_BIN | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32);

// these will throw MessagePack\Exception\InvalidOptionException
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_STR | PackOptions::FORCE_BIN);
$packer = new Packer(PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT32 | PackOptions::FORCE_FLOAT64);

Unpacking

To unpack data you can either use an instance of a BufferUnpacker:

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();

$unpacker->reset($packed);
$value = $unpacker->unpack();

or call a static method on the MessagePack class:

$value = MessagePack::unpack($packed);

If the packed data is received in chunks (e.g. when reading from a stream), use the tryUnpack method, which attempts to unpack data and returns an array of unpacked messages (if any) instead of throwing an InsufficientDataException:

while ($chunk = ...) {
    $unpacker->append($chunk);
    if ($messages = $unpacker->tryUnpack()) {
        return $messages;
    }
}

If you want to unpack from a specific position in a buffer, use seek:

$unpacker->seek(42); // set position equal to 42 bytes
$unpacker->seek(-8); // set position to 8 bytes before the end of the buffer

To skip bytes from the current position, use skip:

$unpacker->skip(10); // set position to 10 bytes ahead of the current position

To get the number of remaining (unread) bytes in the buffer:

$unreadBytesCount = $unpacker->getRemainingCount();

To check whether the buffer has unread data:

$hasUnreadBytes = $unpacker->hasRemaining();

If needed, you can remove already read data from the buffer by calling:

$releasedBytesCount = $unpacker->release();

With the read method you can read raw (packed) data:

$packedData = $unpacker->read(2); // read 2 bytes

Besides the above methods BufferUnpacker provides type-specific unpacking methods, namely:

$unpacker->unpackNil();   // PHP null
$unpacker->unpackBool();  // PHP bool
$unpacker->unpackInt();   // PHP int
$unpacker->unpackFloat(); // PHP float
$unpacker->unpackStr();   // PHP UTF-8 string
$unpacker->unpackBin();   // PHP binary string
$unpacker->unpackArray(); // PHP sequential array
$unpacker->unpackMap();   // PHP associative array
$unpacker->unpackExt();   // PHP MessagePack\Type\Ext object

Unpacking options

The BufferUnpacker object supports a number of bitmask-based options for fine-tuning the unpacking process (defaults are in bold):

NameDescription
BIGINT_AS_STRConverts overflowed integers to strings [1]
BIGINT_AS_GMPConverts overflowed integers to GMP objects [2]
BIGINT_AS_DECConverts overflowed integers to Decimal\Decimal objects [3]

1. The binary MessagePack format has unsigned 64-bit as its largest integer data type, but PHP does not support such integers, which means that an overflow can occur during unpacking.

2. Make sure the GMP extension is enabled.

3. Make sure the Decimal extension is enabled.

Examples:

$packedUint64 = "\xcf"."\xff\xff\xff\xff"."\xff\xff\xff\xff";

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // string(20) "18446744073709551615"

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_GMP);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(GMP) {...}

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker($packedUint64, UnpackOptions::BIGINT_AS_DEC);
var_dump($unpacker->unpack()); // object(Decimal\Decimal) {...}

Custom types

In addition to the basic types, the library provides functionality to serialize and deserialize arbitrary types. This can be done in several ways, depending on your use case. Let's take a look at them.

Type objects

If you need to serialize an instance of one of your classes into one of the basic MessagePack types, the best way to do this is to implement the CanBePacked interface in the class. A good example of such a class is the Map type class that comes with the library. This type is useful when you want to explicitly specify that a given PHP array should be packed as a MessagePack map without triggering an automatic type detection routine:

$packer = new Packer();

$packedMap = $packer->pack(new Map([1, 2, 3]));
$packedArray = $packer->pack([1, 2, 3]);

More type examples can be found in the src/Type directory.

Type transformers

As with type objects, type transformers are only responsible for serializing values. They should be used when you need to serialize a value that does not implement the CanBePacked interface. Examples of such values could be instances of built-in or third-party classes that you don't own, or non-objects such as resources.

A transformer class must implement the CanPack interface. To use a transformer, it must first be registered in the packer. Here is an example of how to serialize PHP streams into the MessagePack bin format type using one of the supplied transformers, StreamTransformer:

$packer = new Packer(null, [new StreamTransformer()]);

$packedBin = $packer->pack(fopen('/path/to/file', 'r+'));

More type transformer examples can be found in the src/TypeTransformer directory.

Extensions

In contrast to the cases described above, extensions are intended to handle extension types and are responsible for both serialization and deserialization of values (types).

An extension class must implement the Extension interface. To use an extension, it must first be registered in the packer and the unpacker.

The MessagePack specification divides extension types into two groups: predefined and application-specific. Currently, there is only one predefined type in the specification, Timestamp.

Timestamp

The Timestamp extension type is a predefined type. Support for this type in the library is done through the TimestampExtension class. This class is responsible for handling Timestamp objects, which represent the number of seconds and optional adjustment in nanoseconds:

$timestampExtension = new TimestampExtension();

$packer = new Packer();
$packer = $packer->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$unpacker = new BufferUnpacker();
$unpacker = $unpacker->extendWith($timestampExtension);

$packedTimestamp = $packer->pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = $unpacker->reset($packedTimestamp)->unpack();

$seconds = $timestamp->getSeconds();
$nanoseconds = $timestamp->getNanoseconds();

When using the MessagePack class, the Timestamp extension is already registered:

$packedTimestamp = MessagePack::pack(Timestamp::now());
$timestamp = MessagePack::unpack($packedTimestamp);

Application-specific extensions

In addition, the format can be extended with your own types. For example, to make the built-in PHP DateTime objects first-class citizens in your code, you can create a corresponding extension, as shown in the example. Please note, that custom extensions have to be registered with a unique extension ID (an integer from 0 to 127).

More extension examples can be found in the examples/MessagePack directory.

To learn more about how extension types can be useful, check out this article.

Exceptions

If an error occurs during packing/unpacking, a PackingFailedException or an UnpackingFailedException will be thrown, respectively. In addition, an InsufficientDataException can be thrown during unpacking.

An InvalidOptionException will be thrown in case an invalid option (or a combination of mutually exclusive options) is used.

Tests

Run tests as follows:

vendor/bin/phpunit

Also, if you already have Docker installed, you can run the tests in a docker container. First, create a container:

./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

The command above will create a container named msgpack with PHP 8.1 runtime. You may change the default runtime by defining the PHP_IMAGE environment variable:

PHP_IMAGE='php:8.0-cli' ./dockerfile.sh | docker build -t msgpack -

See a list of various images here.

Then run the unit tests:

docker run --rm -v $PWD:/msgpack -w /msgpack msgpack

Fuzzing

To ensure that the unpacking works correctly with malformed/semi-malformed data, you can use a testing technique called Fuzzing. The library ships with a help file (target) for PHP-Fuzzer and can be used as follows:

php-fuzzer fuzz tests/fuzz_buffer_unpacker.php

Performance

To check performance, run:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0030 ........ 0.0139
false ................ 0.0037 ........ 0.0144
true ................. 0.0040 ........ 0.0137
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0052 ........ 0.0120
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0059 ........ 0.0114
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0119
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0126
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0064 ........ 0.0132
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0135
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0078 ........ 0.0200
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0212
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0203
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0111 ........ 0.0271
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0115 ........ 0.0260
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0103 ........ 0.0273
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0116 ........ 0.0326
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0118 ........ 0.0332
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0325
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0140 ........ 0.0277
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0294
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0086 ........ 0.0241
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0089 ........ 0.0225
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0085 ........ 0.0229
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0280
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0121 ........ 0.0270
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0109 ........ 0.0274
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0128 ........ 0.0346
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0339
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0135 ........ 0.0368
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0138 ........ 0.0276
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0132 ........ 0.0286
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0274
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0180 ........ 0.0285
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0284
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0275
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0283
fix string #1 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0133
fix string #2 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0216
fix string #3 ........ 0.0094 ........ 0.0222
fix string #4 ........ 0.0091 ........ 0.0241
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0122 ........ 0.0301
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0118 ........ 0.0304
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0119 ........ 0.0315
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0150 ........ 0.0388
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1545 ........ 0.1665
32-bit string ........ 0.1570 ........ 0.1756
wide char string #1 .. 0.0091 ........ 0.0236
wide char string #2 .. 0.0122 ........ 0.0313
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0100 ........ 0.0302
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0123 ........ 0.0324
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0327
16-bit binary ........ 0.0168 ........ 0.0372
32-bit binary ........ 0.1588 ........ 0.1754
fix array #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0131
fix array #2 ......... 0.0294 ........ 0.0367
fix array #3 ......... 0.0412 ........ 0.0472
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1378 ........ 0.1596
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.1865 ........ 0.2283
fix map #1 ........... 0.0725 ........ 0.1048
fix map #2 ........... 0.0319 ........ 0.0405
fix map #3 ........... 0.0356 ........ 0.0665
fix map #4 ........... 0.0465 ........ 0.0497
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2540 ........ 0.3028
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2372 ........ 0.2710
fixext 1 ............. 0.0283 ........ 0.0358
fixext 2 ............. 0.0291 ........ 0.0371
fixext 4 ............. 0.0302 ........ 0.0355
fixext 8 ............. 0.0288 ........ 0.0384
fixext 16 ............ 0.0293 ........ 0.0359
8-bit ext ............ 0.0302 ........ 0.0439
16-bit ext ........... 0.0334 ........ 0.0499
32-bit ext ........... 0.1845 ........ 0.1888
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0337 ........ 0.0547
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0335 ........ 0.0560
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0371 ........ 0.0575
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0374 ........ 0.0542
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0356 ........ 0.0533
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0362 ........ 0.0699
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0381 ........ 0.0701
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0367 ........ 0.0687
=============================================
Total                  2.7618          4.0820
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

With JIT:

php -n -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

=============================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker
---------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0005 ........ 0.0054
false ................ 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
true ................. 0.0004 ........ 0.0059
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0047
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0025 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0023 ........ 0.0046
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0024 ........ 0.0045
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0081
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0043 ........ 0.0079
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0041 ........ 0.0080
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0095
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0091
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0064 ........ 0.0094
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0114
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0122
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0120
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0085 ........ 0.0159
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0157
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0086 ........ 0.0158
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0080
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0042 ........ 0.0081
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0095
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0090
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0056 ........ 0.0085
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0067 ........ 0.0107
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0066 ........ 0.0106
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0104
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0162
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0073 ........ 0.0174
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0072 ........ 0.0164
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0077 ........ 0.0161
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0135
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0135
fix string #1 ....... -0.0002 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0067
fix string #3 ........ 0.0035 ........ 0.0077
fix string #4 ........ 0.0033 ........ 0.0078
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0110
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0121
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0124
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0099 ........ 0.0146
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1522 ........ 0.1474
32-bit string ........ 0.1511 ........ 0.1483
wide char string #1 .. 0.0039 ........ 0.0084
wide char string #2 .. 0.0073 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #1 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0112
8-bit binary #2 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0123
8-bit binary #3 ...... 0.0077 ........ 0.0129
16-bit binary ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0145
32-bit binary ........ 0.1535 ........ 0.1479
fix array #1 ......... 0.0008 ........ 0.0061
fix array #2 ......... 0.0121 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0193 ........ 0.0222
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0607 ........ 0.0479
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S
complex array ........ 0.0749 ........ 0.0824
fix map #1 ........... 0.0329 ........ 0.0431
fix map #2 ........... 0.0161 ........ 0.0189
fix map #3 ........... 0.0205 ........ 0.0262
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0205
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1016 ........ 0.0927
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1096 ........ 0.1030
fixext 1 ............. 0.0157 ........ 0.0161
fixext 2 ............. 0.0175 ........ 0.0183
fixext 4 ............. 0.0156 ........ 0.0185
fixext 8 ............. 0.0163 ........ 0.0184
fixext 16 ............ 0.0164 ........ 0.0182
8-bit ext ............ 0.0158 ........ 0.0207
16-bit ext ........... 0.0203 ........ 0.0219
32-bit ext ........... 0.1614 ........ 0.1539
32-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0195 ........ 0.0249
32-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0188 ........ 0.0260
64-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0281
64-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0212 ........ 0.0291
64-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0207 ........ 0.0295
96-bit timestamp #1 .. 0.0222 ........ 0.0358
96-bit timestamp #2 .. 0.0228 ........ 0.0353
96-bit timestamp #3 .. 0.0210 ........ 0.0319
=============================================
Total                  1.6432          1.9674
Skipped                     4               4
Failed                      0               0
Ignored                     0               0

You may change default benchmark settings by defining the following environment variables:

NameDefault
MP_BENCH_TARGETSpure_p,pure_u, see a list of available targets
MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS100_000
MP_BENCH_DURATIONnot set
MP_BENCH_ROUNDS3
MP_BENCH_TESTS-@slow, see a list of available tests

For example:

export MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p
export MP_BENCH_ITERATIONS=1000000
export MP_BENCH_ROUNDS=5
# a comma separated list of test names
export MP_BENCH_TESTS='complex array, complex map'
# or a group name
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='-@slow' // @pecl_comp
# or a regexp
# export MP_BENCH_TESTS='/complex (array|map)/'

Another example, benchmarking both the library and the PECL extension:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0031 ........ 0.0141 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0064
false ................ 0.0039 ........ 0.0154 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0053
true ................. 0.0038 ........ 0.0139 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0061 ........ 0.0110 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0065 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0029
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0045 ........ 0.0025
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0047 ........ 0.0103 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0022
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0046 ........ 0.0102 ...... 0.0038 ........ 0.0023
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0174 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0031
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0167 ...... 0.0040 ........ 0.0029
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0063 ........ 0.0168 ...... 0.0039 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0092 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0049 ........ 0.0030
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0227 ...... 0.0042 ........ 0.0046
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0123 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0051
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0136 ........ 0.0331 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0130 ........ 0.0336 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0048
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0127 ........ 0.0329 ...... 0.0051 ........ 0.0048
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0126 ........ 0.0268 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0135 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0046
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0131 ........ 0.0274 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0077 ........ 0.0236 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0087 ........ 0.0244 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0048
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0084 ........ 0.0241 ...... 0.0055 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0112 ........ 0.0271 ...... 0.0048 ........ 0.0045
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0124 ........ 0.0292 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0049
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0118 ........ 0.0270 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0050
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0137 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0058 ........ 0.0051
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0133 ........ 0.0366 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0049
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0129 ........ 0.0350 ...... 0.0052 ........ 0.0048
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0145 ........ 0.0254 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0214 ...... 0.0034 ........ 0.0025
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0287 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0050
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0143 ........ 0.0277 ...... 0.0059 ........ 0.0046
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0134 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0052
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0141 ........ 0.0281 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0144 ........ 0.0282 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0050
fix string #1 ........ 0.0036 ........ 0.0143 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0053
fix string #2 ........ 0.0107 ........ 0.0222 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0068
fix string #3 ........ 0.0116 ........ 0.0245 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0069
fix string #4 ........ 0.0105 ........ 0.0253 ...... 0.0083 ........ 0.0077
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0126 ........ 0.0318 ...... 0.0075 ........ 0.0088
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0121 ........ 0.0295 ...... 0.0076 ........ 0.0086
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0125 ........ 0.0293 ...... 0.0130 ........ 0.0093
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0159 ........ 0.0368 ...... 0.0117 ........ 0.0086
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1547 ........ 0.1686 ...... 0.1516 ........ 0.1373
32-bit string ........ 0.1558 ........ 0.1729 ...... 0.1511 ........ 0.1396
wide char string #1 .. 0.0098 ........ 0.0237 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0065
wide char string #2 .. 0.0128 ........ 0.0291 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0082
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0040 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0120 ........ 0.0058
fix array #2 ......... 0.0279 ........ 0.0390 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0165
fix array #3 ......... 0.0415 ........ 0.0463 ...... 0.0162 ........ 0.0187
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.1349 ........ 0.1628 ...... 0.0334 ........ 0.0341
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0345 ........ 0.0391 ...... 0.0143 ........ 0.0168
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0459 ........ 0.0473 ...... 0.0151 ........ 0.0163
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.2518 ........ 0.2962 ...... 0.0400 ........ 0.0490
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.2380 ........ 0.2682 ...... 0.0545 ........ 0.0579
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  1.5625          2.3866        0.7735          0.7243
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

With JIT:

MP_BENCH_TARGETS=pure_p,pure_u,pecl_p,pecl_u \
php -n -dextension=msgpack.so -dzend_extension=opcache.so \
-dpcre.jit=1 -dopcache.jit_buffer_size=64M -dopcache.jit=tracing -dopcache.enable=1 -dopcache.enable_cli=1 \
tests/bench.php

Example output

Filter: MessagePack\Tests\Perf\Filter\ListFilter
Rounds: 3
Iterations: 100000

===========================================================================
Test/Target            Packer  BufferUnpacker  msgpack_pack  msgpack_unpack
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
nil .................. 0.0001 ........ 0.0052 ...... 0.0053 ........ 0.0042
false ................ 0.0007 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0043
true ................. 0.0008 ........ 0.0060 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0021 ........ 0.0043 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0041
7-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0022 ........ 0.0044 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #1 ........ 0.0030 ........ 0.0048 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #2 ........ 0.0032 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
5-bit sint #3 ........ 0.0031 ........ 0.0046 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0040
8-bit uint #1 ........ 0.0054 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0050
8-bit uint #2 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0079 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0044
8-bit uint #3 ........ 0.0051 ........ 0.0082 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
16-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0065 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
16-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0077 ........ 0.0095 ...... 0.0064 ........ 0.0047
32-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0088 ........ 0.0119 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
32-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0117 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0039
32-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0089 ........ 0.0118 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
64-bit uint #1 ....... 0.0097 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #2 ....... 0.0095 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0045
64-bit uint #3 ....... 0.0096 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0047
8-bit int #1 ......... 0.0053 ........ 0.0083 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #2 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
8-bit int #3 ......... 0.0052 ........ 0.0080 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #1 ........ 0.0089 ........ 0.0097 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0046
16-bit int #2 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0093 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0043
16-bit int #3 ........ 0.0075 ........ 0.0094 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #1 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0122 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0044
32-bit int #2 ........ 0.0087 ........ 0.0120 ...... 0.0066 ........ 0.0046
32-bit int #3 ........ 0.0086 ........ 0.0121 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #1 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0149 ...... 0.0060 ........ 0.0045
64-bit int #2 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0062 ........ 0.0044
64-bit int #3 ........ 0.0096 ........ 0.0160 ...... 0.0063 ........ 0.0046
64-bit int #4 ........ 0.0097 ........ 0.0157 ...... 0.0061 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #1 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0153 ...... 0.0056 ........ 0.0044
64-bit float #2 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0152 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0045
64-bit float #3 ...... 0.0079 ........ 0.0155 ...... 0.0057 ........ 0.0044
fix string #1 ........ 0.0010 ........ 0.0045 ...... 0.0071 ........ 0.0044
fix string #2 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0075 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0060
fix string #3 ........ 0.0048 ........ 0.0086 ...... 0.0068 ........ 0.0060
fix string #4 ........ 0.0050 ........ 0.0088 ...... 0.0070 ........ 0.0059
8-bit string #1 ...... 0.0081 ........ 0.0129 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0062
8-bit string #2 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0128 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0065
8-bit string #3 ...... 0.0086 ........ 0.0126 ...... 0.0115 ........ 0.0065
16-bit string #1 ..... 0.0105 ........ 0.0137 ...... 0.0128 ........ 0.0068
16-bit string #2 ..... 0.1510 ........ 0.1486 ...... 0.1526 ........ 0.1391
32-bit string ........ 0.1517 ........ 0.1475 ...... 0.1504 ........ 0.1370
wide char string #1 .. 0.0044 ........ 0.0085 ...... 0.0067 ........ 0.0057
wide char string #2 .. 0.0081 ........ 0.0125 ...... 0.0069 ........ 0.0063
8-bit binary #1 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #2 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
8-bit binary #3 ........... I ............. I ........... F ............. I
16-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
32-bit binary ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix array #1 ......... 0.0014 ........ 0.0059 ...... 0.0132 ........ 0.0055
fix array #2 ......... 0.0146 ........ 0.0156 ...... 0.0155 ........ 0.0148
fix array #3 ......... 0.0211 ........ 0.0229 ...... 0.0179 ........ 0.0180
16-bit array #1 ...... 0.0673 ........ 0.0498 ...... 0.0343 ........ 0.0388
16-bit array #2 ........... S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit array .............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex array ............. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fix map #1 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #2 ........... 0.0148 ........ 0.0180 ...... 0.0156 ........ 0.0179
fix map #3 ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. I
fix map #4 ........... 0.0252 ........ 0.0201 ...... 0.0214 ........ 0.0167
16-bit map #1 ........ 0.1027 ........ 0.0836 ...... 0.0388 ........ 0.0510
16-bit map #2 ............. S ............. S ........... S ............. S
32-bit map ................ S ............. S ........... S ............. S
complex map .......... 0.1104 ........ 0.1010 ...... 0.0556 ........ 0.0602
fixext 1 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 2 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 4 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 8 .................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
fixext 16 ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
8-bit ext ................. I ............. I ........... F ............. F
16-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit ext ................ I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
32-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
64-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #1 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #2 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
96-bit timestamp #3 ....... I ............. I ........... F ............. F
===========================================================================
Total                  0.9642          1.0909        0.8224          0.7213
Skipped                     4               4             4               4
Failed                      0               0            24              17
Ignored                    24              24             0               7

Note that the msgpack extension (v2.1.2) doesn't support ext, bin and UTF-8 str types.

License

The library is released under the MIT License. See the bundled LICENSE file for details.

Author: rybakit
Source Code: https://github.com/rybakit/msgpack.php
License: MIT License

#php 

Migrating From Jira Server: Guide, Pros, And Cons

February 15, 2022 marked a significant milestone in Atlassian’s Server EOL (End Of Life) roadmap. This was not the final step. We still have two major milestones ahead of us: end of new app sales in Feb 2023, and end of support in Feb 2024. In simpler words, businesses still have enough time to migrate their Jira Server to one of the two available products – Atlassian Cloud or Atlassian DC. But the clock is ticking. 

Jira Cloud VS Data Center

If we were to go by Atlassian numbers, 95% of their new customers choose cloud. 

“About 80% of Fortune 500 companies have an Atlassian Cloud license. More than 90% of new customers choose cloud first.” – Daniel Scott, Product Marketing Director, Tempo

So that’s settled, right? We are migrating from Server to Cloud? And what about the solution fewer people talk about yet many users rely on – Jira DC? 

Both are viable options and your choice will depend greatly on the needs of your business, your available resources, and operational processes. 

Let’s start by taking a look at the functionality offered by Atlassian Cloud and Atlassian DC.

FeatureAtlassian CloudAtlassian Data Center
Product PlansMultiple plansOne plan
BillingMonthly and annualAnnual only
Pricing modelPer user or tieredTiered only
SupportVarying support levels depending on your plan: Enterprise support coverage is equivalent to Atlassian’s Data Center Premier Support offeringVarying support levels depending on the package: Priority Support or Premier Support (purchased separately)
Total Cost of OwnershipTCO includes your subscription fee, plus product administration timeTCO includes your subscription fee and product administration time, plus: costs related to infrastructure provisioning or IaaS fees (for example, AWS costs) planned downtime time and resources needed for software upgrades
Data encryption services✅❌
Data residency services✅❌
Audit loggingOrganization-level audit logging available via Atlassian Access (Jira Software, Confluence) 

Product-level audit logs (Jira Software, Confluence)
Advanced audit logging
Device securityMobile device management support (Jira Software, Confluence, Jira Service Management)

Mobile application management (currently on the roadmap)
Mobile device management support (Jira Software, Confluence, Jira Service Management) 
Content security✅❌
Data Storage limits2 GB (Free)

250 GB (Standard)

Unlimited storage (Premium and Enterprise)
No limits
PerformanceContinuous performance updates to improve load times, search responsiveness, and attachments

Cloud infrastructure hosted in six geographic regions to reduce latency
 
Rate limitingCDN supports Smart mirrors and mirror farms (Bitbucket)
Backup and data disaster recoveryJira leverages multiple geographically diverse data centers, has a comprehensive backup program, and gains assurance by regularly testing their disaster recovery and business continuity plans. 

Backups are generated daily and retained for 30 days to allow for point-in-time data restoration
❌
Containerization and orchestration✅Docker images

Kubernetes support (on the roadmap for now)
Change management and upgradesAtlassian automatically handles software and security upgrades for you Sandbox instance to test changes (Premium and Enterprise) 

Release track options for Premium and Enterprise (Jira Software, Jira Service Management, Confluence)
❌
Direct access to the databaseNo direct access to change the database structure, file system, or other server infrastructure

Extensive REST APIs for programmatic data access
Direct database access
Insights and reportingOrganization and admin insights to track adoption of Atlassian products, and evaluate the security of your organization.Data Pipeline for advanced insightsConfluence analytics

Pros and cons of Jira Cloud

When talking about pros and cons, there’s always a chance that a competitive advantage for some is a dealbreaker for others. That’s why I decided to talk about pros and cons in matching pairs. 

Pro: Scalability is one of the primary reasons businesses are choosing Jira Cloud. DC is technically also scalable, but you’ll need to scale on your own whereas the cloud version allows for the infrastructure to scale with your business. 

Con: Despite the cloud’s ability to grow with your business, there is still a user limit of 35k users. In addition to that, the costs will grow alongside your needs. New users, licenses, storage, and computing power – all come at an additional cost. So, when your organization reaches a certain size, migrating to Jira DC becomes more cost-efficient.

Pro: Jira takes care of maintenance and support for you.

Con: Your business can suffer from unpredicted downtime. And there are certain security risks.  

Pro: Extra bells and whistles: 

  • Sandbox: Sandbox is a safe environment system admins can use to test applications and integrations before rolling them out to the production environment. 
  • Release tracks: Admins can be more flexible with their product releases as they can access batch and control cloud releases. This means they’ll have much more time to test existing configurations and workflows against a new update. 
  • Insight Discovery: More data means more ways you can impact your business or product in a positive, meaningful way. 
  • Team Calendars: This is a handy feature for synchronization and synergy across teams. 

Con: Most of these features are locked behind a paywall and are only available to either Premium and Enterprise or only Enterprise licenses (either fully or through addition of functionality. For example, Release tracks are only available to Enterprise customers.) In addition, the costs will grow as you scale the offering to fit your growing needs. 

Pros and cons of Jira Data Center

I’ll be taking the same approach to talking about the pros and cons as I did when writing about Atlassian Cloud. Pros and cons are paired. 

Pro: Hosting your own system means you can scale horizontally and vertically through additional hardware. Extension of your systems is seamless, and there is no downtime (if you do everything correctly). Lastly, you don’t have to worry about the user limit – there is none. 

Con: While having more control over your systems is great, it implies a dedicated staff of engineers, additional expenses on software licensing, hardware, and physical space. Moreover, seamless extension and 0% downtime are entirely on you.

Pro: Atlassian has updated the DC offering with native bundled applications such as Advanced Roadmaps, team calendars and analytics for confluence, insight asset management, and insight discovery in Jira Service Management DC.

Con: Atlassian has updated their pricing to reflect these changes. And you are still getting fewer “bells and whistles” than Jira Cloud users (as we can see from the feature comparison). 

Pro: You are technically safer as the system is supported on your hardware by your specialists. Any and all Jira server issues, poor updates, and downtime are simply not your concern.
 

Con: Atlassian offers excellent security options: data encryption in transit and rest, to mobile app management, to audit offerings and API token controls. In their absence, your team company has to dedicate additional resources to security. 

Pro: Additional benefits from Atlassian, such as the Priority Support bundle (all DC subscriptions have this option), and the Data center loyalty discount (more on that in the pricing section.)

The Pricing

Talking about pricing of SaaS products is always a challenge as there are always multiple tiers and various pay-as-you go features. Barebones Jira Cloud, for instance, is completely free of charge, yet there are a series of serious limitations. 

Standard Jira Cloud will cost you an average of $7.50 per user per month while premium cranks that price up to $14.50. The Enterprise plan is billed annually and the cost is determined on a case-by-case basis. You can see the full comparison of Jira Cloud plans here. And you can use this online calculator to learn the cost of ownership in your particular case.

50 UsersStandard (Monthly/Annually)Premium (Monthly/Annually)
Jira Software$387.50 / $3,900$762.50 / $7,650
Jira Work Management$250 / $2,500❌
Jira Service Management$866.25 / $8,650$2,138.25 / $21,500
Confluence$287.50 / $2,900$550 / $5,500
100 UsersStandard (Monthly/Annually)Premium (Monthly/Annually)
Jira Software$775 / $7,750$1,525 / $15,250
Jira Work Management$500 / $5,000❌
Jira Service Management$1,653.75 / $16,550$4,185.75 / $42,000
Confluence$575 / $5,750$1,100 / $11,000
500 UsersStandard (Monthly/Annually)Premium (Monthly/Annually)
Jira Software$3,140 / $31,500$5,107.50 / $51,000 
Jira Work Management$1,850 / $18,500❌
Jira Service Management$4,541.25 / $45,400$11,693.25 / $117,000
Confluence$2,060 / $20,500$3,780 / $37,800

Please note that these prices were calculated without any apps included. 

Jira Data Center starts at $42,000 per year and the plan includes up to 500 users. If you are a new client and are not eligible for any discounts*, here’s a chart that should give you an idea as to the cost of ownership of Jira DC. You can find more information regarding your specific case here.

UsersCommercial Annual PlanAcademic Annual Plan
1-500USD 42,000USD 21,000
501-1000USD 72,000USD 36,000
1001-2000USD 120,000USD 60,000
Confluence for Data Center  
1-500USD 27,000USD 13,500
501-1000USD 48,000USD 24,000
1001-2000USD 84,000USD 42,000
Bitbucket for Data Center  
1-25USD 2,300USD 1,150
26-50USD 4,200USD 2,100
51-100USD 7,600USD 3,800
Jira Service Management for Data Center  
1-50USD 17,200USD 8,600
51-100USD 28,600USD 14,300
101-250USD 51,500USD 25,750

*Discounts:

  • Centralized per-user licensing allows users access all enterprise instances with a single Enterprise license.
  • There’s an option for dual licensing for users who purchase an annual cloud subscription with 1,001 or more users. In this case, Atlassian extends your existing server maintenance or Data Center subscription for up to one year at a 100% discount.
  • There are certain discounts for apps depending on your partnership level.
  • Depending on your situation, you may qualify for several Jira Data Center discount programs:

What should be your User Migration strategy?

Originally, there were several migration methods: Jira Cloud Migration Assistant, Jira Cloud Site Import, and there was an option to migrate via CSV export (though Jira actively discourages you from using this method). However, Jira’s team has focused their efforts on improving the Migration Assistant and have chosen to discontinue Cloud Site Import support.

Thanks to the broadened functionality of the assistant, it is now the only go-to method for migration with just one exception. If you are migrating over 1000 users and you absolutely need to migrate advanced roadmaps – you’ll need to rely on Site Import. At least for now, as Jira is actively working on implementing this feature in their assistant.

Here’s a quick comparison of the options and their limitations.

 FeaturesLimitations
Cloud Migration AssistantApp migration

Existing data on a Cloud Site is not overwritten

You choose the projects, users, and groups you want to migrate

Jira Service Management customer account migration

Better UI to guide you through the migration

Potential migration errors are displayed in advance

Migration can be done in phases reducing the downtime

Pre- and post-migration reports
You must be on a supported self-managed version of Jira
Site ExportCan migrate Advanced RoadmapsApp data is not migrated

Migration overrides existing data on the Cloud site

Separate user importUsers from external directories are not migrated

No choice of data you want or don’t want migrated

There’s a need to split attachments into up to 5GB chunks

Higher risks of downtime due to the “all or nothing” approach

You must be on a supported self-managed version of Jira

Pro tip: If you have a large base of users (above 2000), migrate them before you migrate projects and spaces. This way, you will not disrupt the workflow as users are still working on Server and the latter migration of data will take less time. 

How to migrate to Jira Cloud

Now that we have settled on one particular offering based on available pricing models as well as the pros and the cons that matter the most to your organization, let’s talk about the “how”. 

How does one migrate from Jira Server to Jira Cloud?

Pre-migration checklist

Jira’s Cloud Migration Assistant is a handy tool. It will automatically review your data for common errors. But it is incapable of doing all of the work for you. That’s why we – and Atlassian for that matter – recommend creating a pre-migration checklist.   

Smart Checklist will help you craft an actionable, context-rich checklist directly inside a Jira ticket. This way, none of the tasks will be missed, lost, or abandoned. 

Below is an example of how your migration checklist will look like in Jira. 

Feel free to copy the code and paste it into your Smart Checklist editor and you’ll have the checklist at the ready. 

# Create a user migration plan #must
> Please keep in mind that Jira Cloud Migration Assistant migrates all users and groups as well as users and groups related to selected projects
- Sync your user base
- Verify synchronization
- External users sync verification
- Active external directory verification
## Check your Jira Server version #must
- Verify via user interface or Support Zip Product Version Verification
> Jira Migration Assistant will not work unless Jira is running on a supported version
## Fix any duplicate email addresses #must
- Verify using SQL
> Duplicate email addresses are not supported by Jira Cloud and therefore can't be migrated with the Jira Cloud Migration Assistant. To avoid errors, you should find and fix any duplicate email addresses before migration. If user information is managed in an LDAP Server, you will need to update emails there and sync with Jira before the migration. If user information is managed locally, you can fix them through the Jira Server or Data Center user interface.
## Make sure you have the necessary permissions #must
- System Admin global permissions on the Server instance
- Exists in the target Cloud site
- Site Administrator Permission in the cloud
## Check for conflicts with group names #must
- Make sure that the groups in your Cloud Site don't have the same names as groups in Server
> Unless you are actively trying to merge them
- Delete or update add-on users so not to cause migration issues
- Verify via SQL
## Update firewall allowance rules #must
- None of the domains should be blocked by firewall or proxy
## Find a way to migrate apps #must
- Contact app vendors
## Check public access settings #must
- Projects
- Filters
- Filters
- Boards
- Dashboards
## Review server setup #mst
- at least 4gb Heap Allocation
- Open Files limit review
- Verify via support zip
## Check Server timezone #must for merging Cloud sites
- Switch to UTC is using any other timezone
> Add a system flag to the Jira Server instance -Duser.timezone=UTC as outlined in this article about updating documentation to include timezone details.
## Fix any duplicate shared configuration
## Storage limits
## Prepare the server instance
- Check data status
- All fields have value and are not null
-Any archived projects you wish to migrate are activated
## Prepare your cloud site
- Same Jira products enabled
- Same language
- User migration strategy
## Data backup
- Backup Jira Server site
- Backup Cloud site
## Run a test migration
- Done
## Notify Jira support
- Get in touch with Jira migration support

Use backups

On the one hand, having all of your Jira products on a server may seem like a backup in and of itself. On the other hand, there are data migration best practices we should follow even if it’s just a precaution. No one has ever felt sorry for their data being too safe. 

In addition, there are certain types of migration errors that can be resolved much faster with having a backup at hand. 

  1. Jira Server Database backup: this step creates a DB backup in an XML format.
    1. Log in with Jira System Admin permissions
    2. Go to system -> Import and Export -> Backup Manager -> Backup for server.
    3. Click the create Backup for server button. 
    4. Type in the name for your backup. 
    5. Jira will create a zipped XML file and notify you once the backup is ready. 

  1. Jira Cloud Backup: This backup also saves your data in an XML format. The process is quite similar to creating a Jira Server backup with the only difference taking place on the Backups page.
    1. Select the option to save your attachments, logos, and avatars.
    2. Click on the Create backup button. 

  1. As you can see, the Cloud backup includes the option to save attachments, avatars, and logos. This step should be done manually when backing up Server data.
    1. Create a Zip archive for this data
    2. Make sure it follows the structure suggested by Atlassian

Migrating your Jira instance to the cloud via the Jira Migration Assistant

Jira Cloud Migration Assistant is a free add-on Atlassian recommends using when migrating to the cloud. It accesses and evaluates your apps and helps migrate multiple projects. 

Overall, the migration assistant offers a more stable and reliable migration experience. It automatically checks for certain errors. It makes sure all users have unique and valid emails, and makes sure that none of the project names and keys conflict with one another. 

This is a step-by-step guide for importing your Jira Server data backup file into Jira Cloud.

  1. Log into Jira Cloud with admin permissions
  2. Go to System -> Import and Export -> External System Import
  3. Click on the Jira Server import option

  1. Select the backup Zip you have created 
  2. Jira will check the file for errors and present you with two options: enable or disable outgoing mail. Don’t worry, you will be able to change this section after the migration process is complete. 
  3. Then you will be presented with an option to merge Jira Server and Jira Cloud users
    1. Choosing overwrite will replace the users with users from the imported files
    2. The merge option will merge groups with the same name
    3. Lastly, you can select the third option if you are migrating users via Jira’s assistant
  4. Run the import

How do you migrate Jira Server into Jira DC?

Before we can proceed with the migration process, please make sure you meet the following prerequisites:

  1. Make sure you are installing Jira on one of the supported platforms. Atlassian has a list of supported platforms for Jira 9.1.
  2. Make sure the applications you are using are compatible with Jira DC. You will be required to switch to datacenter-compatible versions of your applications (they must be available). 
  3. Make sure you meet the necessary software and hardware requirements:
    1. You have a DC license
    2. You are using a supported database, OS, and Java version
    3. You are using OAuth authentication if your application links to other Atlassian products

Once you are certain you are ready to migrate your Jira Server to Jira Data Center, you can proceed with an installation that’s much simpler than one would expect.

  1. Upgrade your apps to be compatible with Jira DC
  2. Go to Administration -> Applications -> Versions and licenses
  3. Enter your Jira DC License Key
  4. Restart Jira

That’s it. You are all set. Well, unless your organization has specific needs such as continuous uptime, performance under heavy loads, and scalability, in which case you will need to set up a server cluster. You can find out more about setting up server clusters in this guide.  

CSS : 3 CSS Tricks You Must Know 2021

3 Must know CSS tricks with Great Examples

Timeline:

00:00 Introduction to video
00:10 Blend Mode
01:33 Clip Path
03:47 Google Fonts

https://youtu.be/dVnzbPOeDYk

##codewelltech #css #youtube #tricks #must #interview

Garry Taylor

Garry Taylor

1669952228

Dijkstra's Algorithm Explained with Examples

In this tutorial, you'll learn: What is Dijkstra's Algorithm and how Dijkstra's algorithm works with the help of visual guides.

You can use algorithms in programming to solve specific problems through a set of precise instructions or procedures.

Dijkstra's algorithm is one of many graph algorithms you'll come across. It is used to find the shortest path from a fixed node to all other nodes in a graph.

There are different representations of Dijkstra's algorithm. You can either find the shortest path between two nodes, or the shortest path from a fixed node to the rest of the nodes in a graph.

In this article, you'll learn how Dijkstra's algorithm works with the help of visual guides.

How Does Dijkstra’s Algorithm Work?

Before we dive into more detailed visual examples, you need to understand how Dijkstra's algorithm works.

Although the theoretical explanation may seem a bit abstract, it'll help you understand the practical aspect better.

In a given graph containing different nodes, we are required to get the shortest path from a given node to the rest of the nodes.

These nodes can represent any object like the names of cities, letters, and so on.

Between each node is a number denoting the distance between two nodes, as you can see in the image below:

nodes-1

We usually work with two arrays – one for visited nodes, and another for unvisited nodes. You'll learn more about the arrays in the next section.

When a node is visited, the algorithm calculates how long it took to get to the node and stores the distance. If a shorter path to a node is found, the initial value assigned for the distance is updated.

Note that a node cannot be visited twice.

The algorithm runs recursively until all the nodes have been visited.

Dijkstra's Algorithm Example

In this section, we'll take a look at a practical example that shows how Dijkstra's algorithm works.

Here's the graph we'll be working with:

nodes

We'll use the table below to put down the visited nodes and their distance from the fixed node:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A
B
C
D
E

Visited nodes = []
Unvisited nodes = [A,B,C,D,E]

Above, we have a table showing each node and the shortest distance from the that node to the fixed node. We are yet to choose the fixed node.

Note that the distance for each node in the table is currently denoted as infinity (∞). This is because we don't know the shortest distance yet.

We also have two arrays – visited and unvisited. Whenever a node is visited, it is added to the visited nodes array.

Let's get started!

To simplify things, I'll break the process down into iterations. You'll see what happens in each step with the aid of diagrams.

Iteration #1

The first iteration might seem confusing, but that's totally fine. Once we start repeating the process in each iteration, you'll have a clearer picture of how the algorithm works.

Step #1 - Pick an unvisited node

We'll choose A as the fixed node. So we'll find the shortest distance from A to every other node in the graph.

node1-1

We're going to give A a distance of 0 because it is the initial node. So the table would look like this:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B
C
D
E

Step #2 - Find the distance from current nodenode1a-3

The next thing to do after choosing a node is to find the distance from it to the unvisited nodes around it.

The two unvisited nodes directly linked to A are B and C.

To get the distance from A to B:

0 + 4 = 4

0 being the value of the current node (A), and 4 being the distance between A and B in the graph.

To get the distance from A to C:

0 + 2 = 2

Step #3 - Update table with known distances

In the last step, we got 4 and 2 as the values of B and C respectively. So we'll update the table with those values:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B4
C2
D
E

Step #4 - Update arrays

At this point, the first iteration is complete. We'll move node A to the visited nodes array:

Visited nodes = [A]
Unvisited nodes = [B,C,D,E]

Before we proceed to the next iteration, you should know the following:

  • Once a node has been visited, it cannot be linked to the current node. Refer to step #2 in the iteration above and step #2 in the next iteration.
  • A node cannot be visited twice.
  • You can only update the shortest known distance if you get a value smaller than the recorded distance.

Iteration #2

Step #1 - Pick an unvisited node

We have four unvisited nodes — [B,C,D,E]. So how do you know which node to pick for the next iteration?

Well, we pick the node with the smallest known distance recorded in the table. Here's the table:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B4
C2
D
E

So we're going with node C.

node2-2

Step #2 - Find the distance from current node

To find the distance from the current node to the fixed node, we have to consider the nodes linked to the current node.

The nodes linked to the current node are A and B.

But A has been visited in the previous iteration so it will not be linked to the current node. That is:

node2a-1

From the diagram above,

  • The green color denotes the current node.
  • The blue color denotes the visited nodes. We cannot link to them or visit them again.
  • The red color shows the link from the unvisited nodes to the current node.

To find the distance from C to B:

2 + 1 = 3

2 above is recorded distance for node C while 1 is the distance between C and B in the graph.

Step #3 - Update table with known distances

In the last step, we got the value of B to be 3. In the first iteration, it was 4.

We're going to update the distance in the table to 3.

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B3
C2
D
E

So, A --> B = 4 (First iteration).

A --> C --> B = 3 (Second iteration).

The algorithm has helped us find the shortest path to B from A.

Step #4 - Update arrays

We're done with the last visited node. Let's add it to the visited nodes array:

Visited nodes = [A,C]
Unvisited nodes = [B,D,E]

Iteration #3

Step #1 - Pick an unvisited node

We're down to three unvisited nodes — [B,D,E]. From the array, B has the shortest known distance.

node3-2

To restate what is going on in the diagram above:

  • The green color denotes the current node.
  • The blue color denotes the visited nodes. We cannot link to them or visit them again.
  • The red color shows the link from the unvisited nodes to the current node.

Step #2 - Find the distance from current node

The nodes linked to the current node are D and E.

B (the current node) has a value of 3. Therefore,

For node D, 3 + 3 = 6.

For node E, 3 + 2 = 5.

Step #3 - Update table with known distances

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B3
C2
D6
E5

Step #4 - Update arrays

Visited nodes = [A,C,B]
Unvisited nodes = [D,E]

Iteration #4

Step #1 - Pick an unvisited node

Like other iterations, we'll go with the unvisited node with the shortest known distance. That is E.

node4-1

Step #2 - Find the distance from current node

According to our table, E has a value of 5.

For D in the current iteration,

5 + 5 = 10.

The value gotten for D here is 10, which is greater than the recorded value of 6 in the previous iteration. For this reason, we'll not update the table.

Step #3 - Update table with known distances

Our table remains the same:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B3
C2
D6
E5

Step #4 - Update arrays

Visited nodes = [A,C,B,E]
Unvisited nodes = [D]

Iteration #5

Step #1 - Pick an unvisited node

We're currently left with one node in the unvisited array — D.

node5-1

Step #2 - Find the distance from current node

The algorithm has gotten to the last iteration. This is because all nodes linked to the current node have been visited already so we can't link to them.

Step #3 - Update table with known distances

Our table remains the same:

NODESHORTEST DISTANCE FROM FIXED NODE
A0
B3
C2
D6
E5

At this point, we have updated the table with the shortest distance from the fixed node to every other node in the graph.

Step #4 - Update arrays

Visited nodes = [A,C,B,E,D]
Unvisited nodes = []

As can be seen above, we have no nodes left to visit. Using Dijkstra's algorithm, we've found the shortest distance from the fixed node to others nodes in the graph.

Dijkstra's Algorithm Pseudocode Example

The pseudocode example in this section was gotten from Wikipedia. Here it is:

 1  function Dijkstra(Graph, source):
 2      
 3      for each vertex v in Graph.Vertices:
 4          dist[v] ← INFINITY
 5          prev[v] ← UNDEFINED
 6          add v to Q
 7      dist[source] ← 0
 8      
 9      while Q is not empty:
10          u ← vertex in Q with min dist[u]
11          remove u from Q
12          
13          for each neighbor v of u still in Q:
14              alt ← dist[u] + Graph.Edges(u, v)
15              if alt < dist[v]:
16                  dist[v] ← alt
17                  prev[v] ← u
18
19      return dist[], prev[]

Applications of Dijkstra's Algorithm

Here are some of the common applications of Dijkstra's algorithm:

  • In maps to get the shortest distance between locations. An example is Google Maps.
  • In telecommunications to determine transmission rate.
  • In robotic design to determine shortest path for automated robots.

Summary

In this article, we talked about Dijkstra's algorithm. It is used to find the shortest distance from a fixed node to all other nodes in a graph.

We started by giving a brief summary of how the algorithm works.

We then had a look at an example that further explained Dijkstra's algorithm in steps using visual guides.

We concluded with a pseudocode example and some of the applications of Dijkstra's algorithm.

Happy coding!

Original article source at https://www.freecodecamp.org

#algorithm #datastructures

A Wrapper for Sembast and SQFlite to Enable Easy

FHIR_DB

This is really just a wrapper around Sembast_SQFLite - so all of the heavy lifting was done by Alex Tekartik. I highly recommend that if you have any questions about working with this package that you take a look at Sembast. He's also just a super nice guy, and even answered a question for me when I was deciding which sembast version to use. As usual, ResoCoder also has a good tutorial.

I have an interest in low-resource settings and thus a specific reason to be able to store data offline. To encourage this use, there are a number of other packages I have created based around the data format FHIR. FHIR® is the registered trademark of HL7 and is used with the permission of HL7. Use of the FHIR trademark does not constitute endorsement of this product by HL7.

Using the Db

So, while not absolutely necessary, I highly recommend that you use some sort of interface class. This adds the benefit of more easily handling errors, plus if you change to a different database in the future, you don't have to change the rest of your app, just the interface.

I've used something like this in my projects:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  Future<Either<DbFailure, Resource>> save(Resource resource) async {
    Resource resultResource;
    try {
      resultResource = await resourceDao.save(resource);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToSave(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultResource);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> returnListOfSingleResourceType(
      String resourceType) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.getAllSortedById(resourceType: resourceType);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }
}

I like this because in case there's an i/o error or something, it won't crash your app. Then, you can call this interface in your app like the following:

final patient = Patient(
    resourceType: 'Patient',
    name: [HumanName(text: 'New Patient Name')],
    birthDate: Date(DateTime.now()),
);

final saveResult = await IFhirDb().save(patient);

This will save your newly created patient to the locally embedded database.

IMPORTANT: this database will expect that all previously created resources have an id. When you save a resource, it will check to see if that resource type has already been stored. (Each resource type is saved in it's own store in the database). It will then check if there is an ID. If there's no ID, it will create a new one for that resource (along with metadata on version number and creation time). It will save it, and return the resource. If it already has an ID, it will copy the the old version of the resource into a _history store. It will then update the metadata of the new resource and save that version into the appropriate store for that resource. If, for instance, we have a previously created patient:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "1",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:41:28.054369Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Patient"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

And we update the last name to 'Provider'. The above version of the patient will be kept in _history, while in the 'Patient' store in the db, we will have the updated version:

{
    "resourceType": "Patient",
    "id": "fhirfli-294057507-6811107",
    "meta": {
        "versionId": "2",
        "lastUpdated": "2020-10-16T19:45:07.316698Z"
    },
    "name": [
        {
            "given": ["New"],
            "family": "Provider"
        }
    ],
    "birthDate": "2020-10-16"
}

This way we can keep track of all previous version of all resources (which is obviously important in medicine).

For most of the interactions (saving, deleting, etc), they work the way you'd expect. The only difference is search. Because Sembast is NoSQL, we can search on any of the fields in a resource. If in our interface class, we have the following function:

  Future<Either<DbFailure, List<Resource>>> searchFunction(
      String resourceType, String searchString, String reference) async {
    List<Resource> resultList;
    try {
      resultList =
          await resourceDao.searchFor(resourceType, searchString, reference);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToObtainList(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(resultList);
  }

You can search for all immunizations of a certain patient:

searchFunction(
        'Immunization', 'patient.reference', 'Patient/$patientId');

This function will search through all entries in the 'Immunization' store. It will look at all 'patient.reference' fields, and return any that match 'Patient/$patientId'.

The last thing I'll mention is that this is a password protected db, using AES-256 encryption (although it can also use Salsa20). Anytime you use the db, you have the option of using a password for encryption/decryption. Remember, if you setup the database using encryption, you will only be able to access it using that same password. When you're ready to change the password, you will need to call the update password function. If we again assume we created a change password method in our interface, it might look something like this:

class IFhirDb {
  IFhirDb();
  final ResourceDao resourceDao = ResourceDao();
  ...
    Future<Either<DbFailure, Unit>> updatePassword(String oldPassword, String newPassword) async {
    try {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(oldPassword, newPassword);
    } catch (error) {
      return left(DbFailure.unableToUpdatePassword(error: error.toString()));
    }
    return right(Unit);
  }

You don't have to use a password, and in that case, it will save the db file as plain text. If you want to add a password later, it will encrypt it at that time.

General Store

After using this for a while in an app, I've realized that it needs to be able to store data apart from just FHIR resources, at least on occasion. For this, I've added a second class for all versions of the database called GeneralDao. This is similar to the ResourceDao, but fewer options. So, in order to save something, it would look like this:

await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'});
await GeneralDao().save('password', {'new':'map'}, 'key');

The difference between these two options is that the first one will generate a key for the map being stored, while the second will store the map using the key provided. Both will return the key after successfully storing the map.

Other functions available include:

// deletes everything in the general store
await GeneralDao().deleteAllGeneral('password'); 

// delete specific entry
await GeneralDao().delete('password','key'); 

// returns map with that key
await GeneralDao().find('password', 'key'); 

FHIR® is a registered trademark of Health Level Seven International (HL7) and its use does not constitute an endorsement of products by HL7®

Use this package as a library

Depend on it

Run this command:

With Flutter:

 $ flutter pub add fhir_db

This will add a line like this to your package's pubspec.yaml (and run an implicit flutter pub get):

dependencies:
  fhir_db: ^0.4.3

Alternatively, your editor might support or flutter pub get. Check the docs for your editor to learn more.

Import it

Now in your Dart code, you can use:

import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/dstu2/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/aes.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/encrypt/salsa.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r5/resource_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/fhir_db.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/general_dao.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/stu3/resource_dao.dart'; 

example/lib/main.dart

import 'package:fhir/r4.dart';
import 'package:fhir_db/r4.dart';
import 'package:flutter/material.dart';
import 'package:test/test.dart';

Future<void> main() async {
  WidgetsFlutterBinding.ensureInitialized();

  final resourceDao = ResourceDao();

  // await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
  await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

  group('Playing with passwords', () {
    test('Playing with Passwords', () async {
      final patient = Patient(id: Id('1'));

      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final search1 = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search1[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', 'newerPw');
      final search2 = await resourceDao.find('newerPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search2[0]);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newerPw', null);
      final search3 = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: Id('1'));
      expect(saved, search3[0]);

      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);
    });
  });

  final id = Id('12345');
  group('Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save(null, observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          null, null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        null,
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType(null,
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources(null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll(null);

      expect(search.length, 0);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Saving Things:', () {
    test('Save Patient', () async {
      await resourceDao.updatePw(null, 'newPw');
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);
      final patient = Patient(id: id, name: [humanName]);
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', patient);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Save Organization', () async {
      final organization = Organization(id: id, name: 'FhirFli');
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', organization);

      expect(saved.id, id);

      expect((saved as Organization).name, 'FhirFli');
    });

    test('Save Observation1', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs1'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1');
    });

    test('Save Observation1 Again', () async {
      final observation1 = Observation(
          id: Id('obs1'),
          code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #1 - Updated'));
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation1);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs1'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #1 - Updated');

      expect(saved.meta?.versionId, Id('2'));
    });

    test('Save Observation2', () async {
      final observation2 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs2'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #2'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation2);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs2'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #2');
    });

    test('Save Observation3', () async {
      final observation3 = Observation(
        id: Id('obs3'),
        code: CodeableConcept(text: 'Observation #3'),
        effectiveDateTime: FhirDateTime(DateTime(1981, 09, 18)),
      );
      final saved = await resourceDao.save('newPw', observation3);

      expect(saved.id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((saved as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });
  });

  group('Password - Finding Things:', () {
    test('Find 1st Patient', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Patient, id: id);
      final humanName = HumanName(family: 'Atreides', given: ['Duke']);

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect((search[0] as Patient).name?[0], humanName);
    });

    test('Find 3rd Observation', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.find('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation, id: Id('obs3'));

      expect(search.length, 1);

      expect(search[0].id, Id('obs3'));

      expect((search[0] as Observation).code.text, 'Observation #3');
    });

    test('Find All Observations', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 3);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Find All (non-historical) Resources', () async {
      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 5);
      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      final obsList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);
      obsList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Observation);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(orgList.length, 1);

      expect(obsList.length, 3);
    });
  });

  group('Password - Deleting Things:', () {
    test('Delete 2nd Observation', () async {
      await resourceDao.delete(
          'newPw', null, R4ResourceType.Observation, Id('obs2'), null, null);

      final search = await resourceDao.getResourceType(
        'newPw',
        resourceTypes: [R4ResourceType.Observation],
      );

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final idList = [];
      for (final obs in search) {
        idList.add(obs.id.toString());
      }

      expect(idList.contains('obs1'), true);

      expect(idList.contains('obs2'), false);

      expect(idList.contains('obs3'), true);
    });

    test('Delete All Observations', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteSingleType('newPw',
          resourceType: R4ResourceType.Observation);

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 2);

      final patList = search.toList();
      final orgList = search.toList();
      patList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Patient);
      orgList.retainWhere(
          (resource) => resource.resourceType == R4ResourceType.Organization);

      expect(patList.length, 1);

      expect(patList.length, 1);
    });

    test('Delete All Resources', () async {
      await resourceDao.deleteAllResources('newPw');

      final search = await resourceDao.getAll('newPw');

      expect(search.length, 0);

      await resourceDao.updatePw('newPw', null);
    });
  });
} 

Download Details:

Author: MayJuun

Source Code: https://github.com/MayJuun/fhir/tree/main/fhir_db

#sqflite  #dart  #flutter