Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1621916810

DockerCon Is Almost Here!

Can you feel it? DockerCon is just days away. There’s still time to register before the one-day, free, virtual extravaganza takes place this Thursday, May 27. Demonstrations, product announcements, company updates — you name it, it’s on the program. All of it focused on modern application delivery in a cloud-native world.

Do DockerCon your way. There’s tons of options. Be sure to catch our line-up of top-notch keynote speakers, which includes Docker CEO Scott Johnston, CTO Justin Cormack, VP of Products Donnie Berkholz, and special guests from GitHub and Orbital Insight.

Check out our recent blog on what not to miss, such as sessions on coding using Docker’s new HTTP APIs, a dive into Docker Dev Environments, tips for navigating a multi-architecture world, and what to do if your container image has more vulnerabilities than you have Twitter followers.

Got questions? Find answers via Live Panels hosted by Docker Captain Bret Fisher, join Peter McKee on two developer focused panels and participate in Hema Ganapathy’s women’s panel. Just put your questions on selected topics in chat, and the team will do their best to answer them. Note: These live streamed Q&A sessions tend to be DevOps focused and super practical.

And don’t forget to come celebrate our global community in Community Rooms — a first at DockerCon.

#dockercon #docker #devops

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

DockerCon Is Almost Here!
Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1621916810

DockerCon Is Almost Here!

Can you feel it? DockerCon is just days away. There’s still time to register before the one-day, free, virtual extravaganza takes place this Thursday, May 27. Demonstrations, product announcements, company updates — you name it, it’s on the program. All of it focused on modern application delivery in a cloud-native world.

Do DockerCon your way. There’s tons of options. Be sure to catch our line-up of top-notch keynote speakers, which includes Docker CEO Scott Johnston, CTO Justin Cormack, VP of Products Donnie Berkholz, and special guests from GitHub and Orbital Insight.

Check out our recent blog on what not to miss, such as sessions on coding using Docker’s new HTTP APIs, a dive into Docker Dev Environments, tips for navigating a multi-architecture world, and what to do if your container image has more vulnerabilities than you have Twitter followers.

Got questions? Find answers via Live Panels hosted by Docker Captain Bret Fisher, join Peter McKee on two developer focused panels and participate in Hema Ganapathy’s women’s panel. Just put your questions on selected topics in chat, and the team will do their best to answer them. Note: These live streamed Q&A sessions tend to be DevOps focused and super practical.

And don’t forget to come celebrate our global community in Community Rooms — a first at DockerCon.

#dockercon #docker #devops

Alycia  Klein

Alycia Klein

1596127080

Top 5 Questions from “How to become a Docker Power User” session at DockerCon 2020

_This is a guest post from Brian Christner. Brian is a Docker Captain since 2016, host of The Byte podcast, and Co-Founder & Site Reliability Engineer at 56K.Cloud. At 56K.Cloud, he helps companies to adapt technologies and concepts like Cloud, Containers, and DevOps. __56K.Cloud _is a Technology company from Switzerland focusing on Automation, IoT, Containerization, and DevOps.

It was a fantastic experience hosting my first ever virtual conference session. The commute to my home office was great, and I even picked up a coffee on the way before my session started. No more waiting in lines, queueing for food, or sitting on the conference floor somewhere in a corner to check emails.

The “DockerCon 2020 that’s a wrap” blog post highlighted my session “How to Become a Docker Power User using VS Code” session was one of the most popular sessions from DockerCon. Docker asked if I could write a recap and summarize some of the top questions that appeared in the chat. Absolutely.

Honestly, I liked the presented/audience interaction more than an in-person conference. Typically, a presenter broadcasts their content to a room full of participants, and if you are lucky and plan your session tempo well enough, you still have 5-10 minutes for Q&A at the end. Even with 5-10 minutes, I find it is never enough time to answer questions, and people always walk away as they have to hurry to the next session.

Virtual Events allow the presenters to answer questions in real-time in the chat. Real-time chat is brilliant as I found a lot more questions were being asked compared to in-person sessions. However, we averaged about 5,500 people online during the session, so the chat became fast and furious with Q&A.

I quickly summarized the Chat transcript of people saying hello from countries/cities around the world. The chat kicked off with people from around the world chiming in to say “Hello from my home country/city. Just from the chat transcripts and people saying hello, I counted the following:

Argentina 1

Austria 2

#community #engineering #products #brian christner #dockercon #dockercon 2020

Misael  Stark

Misael Stark

1619560380

Save the Date for DockerCon Live 2021!

As the calendar leaves 2020 in the rear view mirror, we’re looking forward to the year ahead. And as part of this, today we’re announcing the dates for DockerCon Live 2021. DockerCon Live will take place on May 27th, 2021. Sign up here to pre-register for the event!

Once again, DockerCon Live will be a free, online experience full of demos of products and innovation from Docker and our partners. You’ll get deep technical sessions from Docker experts, Docker Captains and luminaries from across the industry, along with a chance for the community to gather and connect with colleagues around the world.

#docker community #dockercon

Yep, We Should (Almost) Always Build An API

Last week I published a post entitled Opinion Time: Should Developers ALWAYS Build an API?. I got quite a bit of useful feedback on that post, and so I decided that I needed to publish a followup post so that I could parse and interpret all the different opinions you lovely readers gave. I was expected something of a heated fight, or at least a good match, but it turned out to be a slaughter. One side clearly and convincingly won the argument: almost all of the commenters on the original post agreed that building an API is a good idea, most of the time.

A questionnaire with "Yes" "No" and "Maybe" answers, where the "Yes" answer has an X in the box.

What’s An “API” Anyway?

Before we can even ask if we should always build an API, perhaps we should figure out exactly what that means.

API stands for Application Programming Interface, a wildly generic term on its face. When I wrote the Opinion Time post, I was thinking of an API as being a separate, stand alone service or data store which could be consumed by another application; commenters have rightly pointed out that my definition of an API was far too narrow:

…I think that in this case you’re incorrectly thinking that your two opinions disagree with each other. They don’t.

Yes, you want separation of concerns. You’re right. That is “always” good.

Yes, you want to avoid YAGNI. You’re right. That too is almost “always” good.

But in both cases, there is a matter of how far you push it.

Does your “API” have to be a separately deployable HTTP endpoint? Could your API just be a second set of controllers in the same application?

Perhaps your “API” is as simple as a “repository layer” in a separate class library in the same solution as your MVC UI site.

– Travis Laborde

Travis brings up another good point: we want, need, separation of concerns in our apps. In a world where no single idea can be always good or always bad, separation of concerns is one of the few concepts that is consistently valid and accepted. So wouldn’t building an “API” (for whatever that means) be a good thing most of the time?

Experience Trumps Theory

Another commenter had a personal experience that led him to the same conclusion as Travis:

At one point I would [have] thought that we do not always need an API for every application. However recently I have a project of moving an existing application without an API have it interact with a new system/front end. Now the task of writing the API to fit within the existing structure of the old program and interact with the new system/front end has become quite a task.

For me I will always want this separation using an API.

– James Bridenthal

In fact, quite a few people had personal experiences that led them to the same conclusion:

Just this year, our organization decided to “open” our systems up to a third party for the first time - in terms of exposing an external API.

What we’ve discovered is that, even where we don’t have the exact right APIs already developed for this third party, the systems which already have the API separation are proving trivial to amend to fit the requirements. Whereas the monoliths (of which we have several) are proving problematic to provide APIs for.

– Damien

Need To Be Flexible

A couple people pointed out that the real reason we would to build an API was flexibility, including the potential to refactor to new technologies as they become available:

I am pretty firmly in the API ALL THE THINGS camp. In my experience, you can never predict when you may be asked to expose functionality you’ve built to something other than the original application. Just today, I was approached about exposing functionality … from an app written four years ago to a third party.

Building with an API from the ground-up allows that future flexibility. As others have noted, adding an API layer after the fact is almost always going to be more difficult/time-consuming. It also helps to ensure that separation of concerns is baked in to the architecture.

– Brian Griffith

Solve A Problem, Not All Problems

One commenter preached caution when deciding what standard to build your API against:

I second David Fowler: “If you have an abstraction with a single implementation then you don’t have an abstraction.”

As long as the API has only one consumer, it’s entire job should service that consumer. Make it REST-ish, sure, but don’t bend over backwards to meet some arbitrary ideal standard. Need to use POST as an RPC (Remote Procedure Call)? Go right ahead. Clean it up when you need to.

– Steve Cleary

#research #api #almost #build

DockerCon LIVE 2020: Captains on Deck!

_This is a guest post from Docker Captain Bret Fisher, a long-time DevOps sysadmin and speaker who teaches container skills with his popular Docker Mastery courses Docker Mastery, Kubernetes Mastery, Docker for Node.js, and Swarm Mastery, weekly YouTube Live shows. Bret also consults with companies adopting Docker. Join Bret and other Docker Captains at DockerCon LIVE 2020 on May 28th, where they’ll be live all day hanging out, answering questions and having fun. _

When Docker announced in December that it was continuing its DockerCon tradition, albeit virtually, I was super excited and disappointed at the same time. It may sound cliché but truly, my favorite part of attending conferences is seeing old friends and fellow Captains, meeting new people, making new friends, and seeing my students in real life.

Can a virtual event live up to its in-person version? My friend Phil Estes was honest about his experience on Twitter and I agree… it’s not the same. Online events shouldn’t be one-way information dissemination. As attendees, we should be able to do something, not just watch.

Well, challenge accepted. We’ve been working hard for months to pull together a great event for you – and this was before #quarantinelife and knowing ALL events would go virtual this year. Honestly, the more we get into the planning for DockerCon LIVE, the more excited I get. The reach of a virtual event is much broader, and for many, this will be the first DockerCon they will attend.

DockerCon LIVE’s format is a 1-day online event with 3+ simultaneous streams for you to choose from, and it’s not all session talks. Best of all, it’s free for everyone. As of the time I’m writing this, there are more than 36,000 people signed up!

As part of the jam-packed line-up, I’ll be hosting Captains On Deck, one of the three co-streaming Channels, where we’ll rotate Docker Captains — 2 per hour — and we’ll hang out, talk tech, and answer your questions real-time. At past DockerCons, Captains frequently hosted very popular Hallway Tracks, and we took what we loved about those events – meeting members of the community, talking shop, answering questions and having a lot of laughs. Captains on Deck was designed to virtualize that experience and make it last all day.

#community #docker captain #dockercon #docker