Zak Dyer

Zak Dyer

1591754451

VS Code Go Extension Joins The Go Project

When the Go project began, “an overarching goal was that Go do more to help the working programmer by enabling tooling, automating mundane tasks such as code formatting, and removing obstacles to working on large code bases” (Go FAQ). Today, more than a decade later, we continue to be guided by that same goal, especially as it pertains to the programmer’s most critical tool: their editor.

Throughout the past decade, Go developers have relied on a variety of editors and dozens of independently authored tools and plugins. Much of Go’s early success can be attributed to the fantastic development tools created by the Go community. The VS Code extension for Go, built using many of these tools, is now used by 41 percent of Go developers (Go developer survey).

As the VS Code Go extension grows in popularity and as the ecosystem expands, it requires more maintenance and support. Over the past few years, the Go team has collaborated with the VS Code team to help the Go extension maintainers. The Go team also began a new initiative to improve the tools powering all Go editor extensions, with a focus on supporting the Language Server Protocol with gopls and the Debug Adapter Protocol with Delve.

Through this collaborative work between the VS Code and Go teams, we realized that the Go team is uniquely positioned to evolve the Go development experience alongside the Go language.

As a result, we’re happy to announce the next phase in the Go team’s partnership with the VS Code team: The VS Code extension for Go is officially joining the Go project. With this come two critical changes:

  1. The publisher of the plugin is shifting from “Microsoft” to “Go Team at Google”.
  2. The project’s repository is moving to join the rest of the Go project at https://github.com/golang/vscode-go.

We cannot overstate our gratitude to those who have helped build and maintain this beloved extension. We know that innovative ideas and features come from you, our users. The Go team’s primary aim as owners of the extension is to reduce the burden of maintenance work on the Go community. We’ll make sure the builds stay green, the issues get triaged, and the docs get updated. Go team members will keep contributors abreast of relevant language changes, and we’ll smooth the rough edges between the extension’s different dependencies.

Please continue to share your thoughts with us by filing issues and making contributions to the project. The process for contributing will now be the same as for the rest of the Go project. Go team members will offer general help in the #vscode channel on Gophers Slack, and we’ve also created a #vscode-dev channel to discuss issues and brainstorm ideas with contributors.

We’re excited about this new step forward, and we hope you are too. By maintaining a major Go editor extension, as well as the Go tooling and language, the Go team will be able to provide all Go users, regardless of their editor, a more cohesive and refined development experience.

As always, our goal remains the same: Every user should have an excellent experience writing Go code.

See the accompanying post from the Visual Studio Code team.

#go #golang #vscode #developer

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VS Code Go Extension Joins The Go Project
Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1593867420

Top Android Projects with Source Code

Android Projects with Source Code – Your entry pass into the world of Android

Hello Everyone, welcome to this article, which is going to be really important to all those who’re in dilemma for their projects and the project submissions. This article is also going to help you if you’re an enthusiast looking forward to explore and enhance your Android skills. The reason is that we’re here to provide you the best ideas of Android Project with source code that you can choose as per your choice.

These project ideas are simple suggestions to help you deal with the difficulty of choosing the correct projects. In this article, we’ll see the project ideas from beginners level and later we’ll move on to intermediate to advance.

top android projects with source code

Android Projects with Source Code

Before working on real-time projects, it is recommended to create a sample hello world project in android studio and get a flavor of project creation as well as execution: Create your first android project

Android Projects for beginners

1. Calculator

build a simple calculator app in android studio source code

Android Project: A calculator will be an easy application if you have just learned Android and coding for Java. This Application will simply take the input values and the operation to be performed from the users. After taking the input it’ll return the results to them on the screen. This is a really easy application and doesn’t need use of any particular package.

To make a calculator you’d need Android IDE, Kotlin/Java for coding, and for layout of your application, you’d need XML or JSON. For this, coding would be the same as that in any language, but in the form of an application. Not to forget creating a calculator initially will increase your logical thinking.

Once the user installs the calculator, they’re ready to use it even without the internet. They’ll enter the values, and the application will show them the value after performing the given operations on the entered operands.

Source Code: Simple Calculator Project

2. A Reminder App

Android Project: This is a good project for beginners. A Reminder App can help you set reminders for different events that you have throughout the day. It’ll help you stay updated with all your tasks for the day. It can be useful for all those who are not so good at organizing their plans and forget easily. This would be a simple application just whose task would be just to remind you of something at a particular time.

To make a Reminder App you need to code in Kotlin/Java and design the layout using XML or JSON. For the functionality of the app, you’d need to make use of AlarmManager Class and Notifications in Android.

In this, the user would be able to set reminders and time in the application. Users can schedule reminders that would remind them to drink water again and again throughout the day. Or to remind them of their medications.

3. Quiz Application

Android Project: Another beginner’s level project Idea can be a Quiz Application in android. Here you can provide the users with Quiz on various general knowledge topics. These practices will ensure that you’re able to set the layouts properly and slowly increase your pace of learning the Android application development. In this you’ll learn to use various Layout components at the same time understanding them better.

To make a quiz application you’ll need to code in Java and set layouts using xml or java whichever you prefer. You can also use JSON for the layouts whichever preferable.

In the app, questions would be asked and answers would be shown as multiple choices. The user selects the answer and gets shown on the screen if the answers are correct. In the end the final marks would be shown to the users.

4. Simple Tic-Tac-Toe

android project tic tac toe game app

Android Project: Tic-Tac-Toe is a nice game, I guess most of you all are well aware of it. This will be a game for two players. In this android game, users would be putting X and O in the given 9 parts of a box one by one. The first player to arrange X or O in an adjacent line of three wins.

To build this game, you’d need Java and XML for Android Studio. And simply apply the logic on that. This game will have a set of three matches. So, it’ll also have a scoreboard. This scoreboard will show the final result at the end of one complete set.

Upon entering the game they’ll enter their names. And that’s when the game begins. They’ll touch one of the empty boxes present there and get their turn one by one. At the end of the game, there would be a winner declared.

Source Code: Tic Tac Toe Game Project

5. Stopwatch

Android Project: A stopwatch is another simple android project idea that will work the same as a normal handheld timepiece that measures the time elapsed between its activation and deactivation. This application will have three buttons that are: start, stop, and hold.

This application would need to use Java and XML. For this application, we need to set the timer properly as it is initially set to milliseconds, and that should be converted to minutes and then hours properly. The users can use this application and all they’d need to do is, start the stopwatch and then stop it when they are done. They can also pause the timer and continue it again when they like.

6. To Do App

Android Project: This is another very simple project idea for you as a beginner. This application as the name suggests will be a To-Do list holding app. It’ll store the users schedules and their upcoming meetings or events. In this application, users will be enabled to write their important notes as well. To make it safe, provide a login page before the user can access it.

So, this app will have a login page, sign-up page, logout system, and the area to write their tasks, events, or important notes. You can build it in android studio using Java and XML at ease. Using XML you can build the user interface as user-friendly as you can. And to store the users’ data, you can use SQLite enabling the users to even delete the data permanently.

Now for users, they will sign up and get access to the write section. Here the users can note down the things and store them permanently. Users can also alter the data or delete them. Finally, they can logout and also, login again and again whenever they like.

7. Roman to decimal converter

Android Project: This app is aimed at the conversion of Roman numbers to their significant decimal number. It’ll help to check the meaning of the roman numbers. Moreover, it will be easy to develop and will help you get your hands on coding and Android.

You need to use Android Studio, Java for coding and XML for interface. The application will take input from the users and convert them to decimal. Once it converts the Roman no. into decimal, it will show the results on the screen.

The users are supposed to just enter the Roman Number and they’ll get the decimal values on the screen. This can be a good android project for final year students.

8. Virtual Dice Roller

Android Project: Well, coming to this part that is Virtual Dice or a random no. generator. It is another simple but interesting app for computer science students. The only task that it would need to do would be to generate a number randomly. This can help people who’re often confused between two or more things.

Using a simple random number generator you can actually create something as good as this. All you’d need to do is get you hands-on OnClick listeners. And a good layout would be cherry on the cake.

The user’s task would be to set the range of the numbers and then click on the roll button. And the app will show them a randomly generated number. Isn’t it interesting ? Try soon!

9. A Scientific Calculator App

Android Project: This application is very important for you as a beginner as it will let you use your logical thinking and improve your programming skills. This is a scientific calculator that will help the users to do various calculations at ease.

To make this application you’d need to use Android Studio. Here you’d need to use arithmetic logics for the calculations. The user would need to give input to the application that will be in terms of numbers. After that, the user will give the operator as an input. Then the Application will calculate and generate the result on the user screen.

10. SMS App

Android Project: An SMS app is another easy but effective idea. It will let you send the SMS to various no. just in the same way as you use the default messaging application in your phone. This project will help you with better understanding of SMSManager in Android.

For this application, you would need to implement Java class SMSManager in Android. For the Layout you can use XML or JSON. Implementing SMSManager into the app is an easy task, so you would love this.

The user would be provided with the facility to text to whichever number they wish also, they’d be able to choose the numbers from the contact list. Another thing would be the Textbox, where they’ll enter their message. Once the message is entered they can happily click on the send button.

#android tutorials #android application final year project #android mini projects #android project for beginners #android project ideas #android project ideas for beginners #android projects #android projects for students #android projects with source code #android topics list #intermediate android projects #real-time android projects

A 4-Step Guide to Help Beginners Get Started on Coding Projects

Starting something new is always difficult. When I working on my first coding project, I was wondering where to begin. I wondered what technologies I should use and whether I would come up with a good project idea. Today we will be going over my beginner’s guide to coding projects. I want to help you answer the same questions I asked myself when I worked on my first project. This will be especially helpful for people with little to no experience working on coding projects. If this post is helpful, please consider subscribing to my YouTube channel or check out my other articles for more content like this!

If you do not have any experience coding, that is completely fine! I recommend you take one of these free, online courses that will teach you the fundamentals of programming and a programming language: Java (commonly used to develop Android apps, web backends, etc.), Python (commonly used for data science and backend web development), HTML + CSS + JavaScript (used for frontend and backend web development).

1. Identify Your Technologies

I recommend mostly using technologies you are familiar with. You can use at most one or two new technologies. This will add some challenge to the project to encourage you to pick them up as you go, but will not overwhelm you such that you will not be able to make progress. In addition to establishing technologies, you also want to decide on the format of the project. This could be a web app, mobile app, database project, etc — this may also influence what technologies you need to use.

2. Come Up With an Idea

I recommend keeping things simple here. When I was working on my first project, I would keep questioning my ideas. I kept trying to build something innovative, but eventually, I understood that this was not the goal of the project. I should not judge the success of this project on how many users I have or whether I can build the next billion dollar company with it. The goal of this project is for you to learn and so long as you achieve that, the project is a success. Some common ideas for a first project include a personal website, simple mobile app, or following a tutorial and building on top of that.

3. Work on the Project

You need to find what motivates you to work on the project. You want to be working on it regularly. Also, you will inevitably get stuck trying to figure something out or debugging your project. It is important to remember that everyone faces this and that there are plenty of resources out there to help. For example, simply searching the question you have or the error message you received can yield answers. Websites such as Stack Overflow were built to allow the community to help coders who are encountering a blocker. Use these sites to get unblocked and you will be on your way to completing that project.

4. Share Your Project on GitHub

GitHub is a website that allows anyone to view and collaborate on open source projects. GitHub splits these up into repositories of files that make up the project itself. If you have never used git (a version control system) or GitHub, then I recommend reading this guide which will run you through the basics.

Once your project is complete, you should put up your project in one or more repositories on GitHub. This helps for two main reasons. First, you can easily share your projects with others. All it takes is sharing the link to your GitHub profile on your resume for recruiters, hiring managers, interviewers, and more to view your projects. Second, if you are working on a website, GitHub pages takes care of hosting the website for you. All you need to do is upload your files to a GitHub repository, set it up with GitHub pages, and your website will be published at .github.io.

Source of Image

I hope you found this story informative! Please share it with a friend you think might benefit from it as well! If you liked the post/video, feel free to like and subscribe to my YouTube account and check out my other articles for more content like this. Also, follow me on Twitter for updates on when I am posting new content and check me out on Instagram. I hope to see you all on the next one!

If you prefer to follow along via my YouTube video, you can watch it here!

#side-project #project-planning #programming #coding #side-projects #build-a-side-project #how-to-start-coding-projects #self-improvement

Nabunya  Jane

Nabunya Jane

1620290313

10 Most Useful VS Code Extensions For Web Development

Microsoft Visual Studio Code (VS Code) is one of the top code editors for software developers. Since its release, its popularity has surged not only because of the stable platform it provides, but also because of the extensible nature that Microsoft built into it.

T

his article will cover 10 developer problems those can be solved by below extensions and help you to become 10x engineer.

#vscode #extension #vs-code-extensions #web-development #vs code

Shawn  Durgan

Shawn Durgan

1595547778

10 Writing steps to create a good project brief - Mobile app development

Developing a mobile application can often be more challenging than it seems at first glance. Whether you’re a developer, UI designer, project lead or CEO of a mobile-based startup, writing good project briefs prior to development is pivotal. According to Tech Jury, 87% of smartphone users spend time exclusively on mobile apps, with 18-24-year-olds spending 66% of total digital time on mobile apps. Of that, 89% of the time is spent on just 18 apps depending on individual users’ preferences, making proper app planning crucial for success.

Today’s audiences know what they want and don’t want in their mobile apps, encouraging teams to carefully write their project plans before they approach development. But how do you properly write a mobile app development brief without sacrificing your vision and staying within the initial budget? Why should you do so in the first place? Let’s discuss that and more in greater detail.

Why a Good Mobile App Project Brief Matters?

Why-a-Good-Mobile-App-Project-Brief-Matters

It’s worth discussing the significance of mobile app project briefs before we tackle the writing process itself. In practice, a project brief is used as a reference tool for developers to remain focused on the client’s deliverables. Approaching the development process without written and approved documentation can lead to drastic, last-minute changes, misunderstanding, as well as a loss of resources and brand reputation.

For example, developing a mobile app that filters restaurants based on food type, such as Happy Cow, means that developers should stay focused on it. Knowing that such and such features, UI elements, and API are necessary will help team members collaborate better in order to meet certain expectations. Whether you develop an app under your brand’s banner or outsource coding and design services to would-be clients, briefs can provide you with several benefits:

  • Clarity on what your mobile app project “is” and “isn’t” early in development
  • Point of reference for developers, project leads, and clients throughout the cycle
  • Smart allocation of available time and resources based on objective development criteria
  • Streamlined project data storage for further app updates and iterations

Writing Steps to Create a Good Mobile App Project Brief

Writing-Steps-to-Create-a-Good-Mobile-App-Project-Brief

1. Establish the “You” Behind the App

Depending on how “open” your project is to the public, you will want to write a detailed section about who the developers are. Elements such as company name, address, project lead, project title, as well as contact information, should be included in this introductory segment. Regardless of whether you build an in-house app or outsource developers to a client, this section is used for easy document storage and access.

#android app #ios app #minimum viable product (mvp) #mobile app development #web development #how do you write a project design #how to write a brief #how to write a project summary #how to write project summary #program brief example #project brief #project brief example #project brief template #project proposal brief #simple project brief template

Tyrique  Littel

Tyrique Littel

1604008800

Static Code Analysis: What It Is? How to Use It?

Static code analysis refers to the technique of approximating the runtime behavior of a program. In other words, it is the process of predicting the output of a program without actually executing it.

Lately, however, the term “Static Code Analysis” is more commonly used to refer to one of the applications of this technique rather than the technique itself — program comprehension — understanding the program and detecting issues in it (anything from syntax errors to type mismatches, performance hogs likely bugs, security loopholes, etc.). This is the usage we’d be referring to throughout this post.

“The refinement of techniques for the prompt discovery of error serves as well as any other as a hallmark of what we mean by science.”

  • J. Robert Oppenheimer

Outline

We cover a lot of ground in this post. The aim is to build an understanding of static code analysis and to equip you with the basic theory, and the right tools so that you can write analyzers on your own.

We start our journey with laying down the essential parts of the pipeline which a compiler follows to understand what a piece of code does. We learn where to tap points in this pipeline to plug in our analyzers and extract meaningful information. In the latter half, we get our feet wet, and write four such static analyzers, completely from scratch, in Python.

Note that although the ideas here are discussed in light of Python, static code analyzers across all programming languages are carved out along similar lines. We chose Python because of the availability of an easy to use ast module, and wide adoption of the language itself.

How does it all work?

Before a computer can finally “understand” and execute a piece of code, it goes through a series of complicated transformations:

static analysis workflow

As you can see in the diagram (go ahead, zoom it!), the static analyzers feed on the output of these stages. To be able to better understand the static analysis techniques, let’s look at each of these steps in some more detail:

Scanning

The first thing that a compiler does when trying to understand a piece of code is to break it down into smaller chunks, also known as tokens. Tokens are akin to what words are in a language.

A token might consist of either a single character, like (, or literals (like integers, strings, e.g., 7Bob, etc.), or reserved keywords of that language (e.g, def in Python). Characters which do not contribute towards the semantics of a program, like trailing whitespace, comments, etc. are often discarded by the scanner.

Python provides the tokenize module in its standard library to let you play around with tokens:

Python

1

import io

2

import tokenize

3

4

code = b"color = input('Enter your favourite color: ')"

5

6

for token in tokenize.tokenize(io.BytesIO(code).readline):

7

    print(token)

Python

1

TokenInfo(type=62 (ENCODING),  string='utf-8')

2

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='color')

3

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='=')

4

TokenInfo(type=1  (NAME),      string='input')

5

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string='(')

6

TokenInfo(type=3  (STRING),    string="'Enter your favourite color: '")

7

TokenInfo(type=54 (OP),        string=')')

8

TokenInfo(type=4  (NEWLINE),   string='')

9

TokenInfo(type=0  (ENDMARKER), string='')

(Note that for the sake of readability, I’ve omitted a few columns from the result above — metadata like starting index, ending index, a copy of the line on which a token occurs, etc.)

#code quality #code review #static analysis #static code analysis #code analysis #static analysis tools #code review tips #static code analyzer #static code analysis tool #static analyzer