Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1591803780

How to Start Your Career in Tech Without a Computer Science Degree

So you’ve decided you are interested in starting in a career in tech , congrats!
According to CNBC, there are approximately 700,000 vacant tech jobs in the United States. There is no better time to get started!
Little disclaimer, I have a degree in computer science. However, in every single job I have held — from fullstack web development to research and development — 90% of my coworkers did not have a computer science (or similar) degree. Plus, at my first job out of college as a robotic process automation engineer, less than half of my entire department of engineers had a college degree. The point I am trying to make is: I have seen both sides and usually, honestly, unless you are going for a really fru-fru software engineering job somewhere in Corporate America, it doesn’t matter.

#career-change #coding #careers #technology #career-advice

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How to Start Your Career in Tech Without a Computer Science Degree
Uriah  Dietrich

Uriah Dietrich

1618449987

How To Build A Data Science Career In 2021

For this week’s data science career interview, we got in touch with Dr Suman Sanyal, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at NIIT University. In this interview, Dr Sanyal shares his insights on how universities can contribute to this highly promising sector and what aspirants can do to build a successful data science career.

With industry-linkage, technology and research-driven seamless education, NIIT University has been recognised for addressing the growing demand for data science experts worldwide with its industry-ready courses. The university has recently introduced B.Tech in Data Science course, which aims to deploy data sets models to solve real-world problems. The programme provides industry-academic synergy for the students to establish careers in data science, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

“Students with skills that are aligned to new-age technology will be of huge value. The industry today wants young, ambitious students who have the know-how on how to get things done,” Sanyal said.

#careers # #data science aspirant #data science career #data science career intervie #data science education #data science education marke #data science jobs #niit university data science

Julie  Donnelly

Julie Donnelly

1598437920

Building a Career in Software Development Without a Computer Science Degree

  1. Do you want to get a job as a Software Engineer at FAANG Companies but do not have a computer science degree?
  2. Could you not get CS in your dream college because you ended up screwing JEE but want to build a career in tech?
  3. Did you join your non-core (!CS, !Electrical, !ECE, !MSM) branch just because you could not get the desired branch/college due to not so great JEE Rank, and now you are stuck because it’s boring?
  4. Do you just want to get a job in coding with a handsome salary to support your family but do not know where to start?
  5. Are you from a Tier2 or Tier 3 college and do not have a mentor to guide you for building a career in Software Development?

If the answer to any of these questions is Yes!, Then you have come to the right place. :)

Before we start, I’d like to introduce myself and give a little background information. I am a graduate from IIT Roorkee from the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department without a decent CGPA. But currently, I am working for Amazon as an SDE-1 (Software Development Engineer) and I interned with the Google Summer of Code Program twice (2020 & 2019). If I can do this, so can you!

Let me introduce you to three friends Aayush, Bhaskar, and Chirag (names may or may not changed). They got JEE ranks of 2500, 7000, and 13000 respectively. They had several choices of colleges and branches. They could have a CS major at one of the new IITs or a noncore branch at one of the old IITs or CS branch at Tier 2 or Tier 3 college. They took the following choices:

  • Aayush took Civil Engineering in IIT Delhi.
  • Bhaskar took Electrical at one of the new IITs.
  • Chirag joined a Tier 2 college with CS major.

Each one of them has his own grievances. Aayush is worried that not many companies would recruit software developers from his branch as it’s not related to Computer Science. Bhaskar is worried that since his IIT is a new one, so many companies may not visit it for campus recruitments and he may have to apply off-campus. Chirag has a CSE degree but is worried that he may not get recognition because his college is not Tier 1 and his peer group is not competitive. A grievance common to all three of them is that each one of them does not know how to build a career in Software Development and get a job at their dream company.

Can you relate to any of these three guys? Did you also choose a non-core branch in a reputed college because of brand value? Could you not get your department changed to CSE because you got a 7 pointer in your first year and the cut-off for CSE is 9.8? Do you find your department not interesting enough and now you are stuck with a low CGPA? Are you worried about the internship and placement season? Does your friend keep boasting about his Codeforces rank and you don’t know where to start? Are you confused about whether you should start Web Development or Machine Learning? Are you afraid that you won’t be able to build a career in tech because you screwed up your programming course in the first year?

If the answer to any of the questions above is Yes, then you’ll be happy to know that you can build a successful career in software development by following a simple strategy or path. All you need is a laptop and an internet connection and you’ll be good to go. In this post, I’ll be targeting the individuals who want to build a career in software development but do not have a CS major or proper mentorship from seniors for whatsoever reasons. We’ll be going through a road map that you can follow to cover all major topics of CS without feeling lost. I’ve seen people jump into Android Development without knowing Java/Kotlin or basics of Data Structures and Algorithms and therefore losing interest afterward. Don’t do this.

This post is relevant for all people out there irrespective of their year of study or branch. Even if you are enrolled in a CS degree or even if you are a graduate who’s looking to switch career or if you are looking for a quick guide to get a coding job in a small period of time, the post would be helpful.I’ll be only mentioning the essentials.

Here we begin:

I’ve divided the road map into three phases. After the first phase, you should be able to solve basic CP problems. After the second phase, you should be employable by major Tech firms like FAANG. The third phase teaches you web development to increase your chances of placement. The fourth phase will teach you about hotshot topics of CS like ML, DL, and other topics that may be of help while preparing for interviews and would be discussed in Part 2 of this article.

#computer-science #software-development #software-engineering #careers #career-advice #data science

Arvel  Parker

Arvel Parker

1591803780

How to Start Your Career in Tech Without a Computer Science Degree

So you’ve decided you are interested in starting in a career in tech , congrats!
According to CNBC, there are approximately 700,000 vacant tech jobs in the United States. There is no better time to get started!
Little disclaimer, I have a degree in computer science. However, in every single job I have held — from fullstack web development to research and development — 90% of my coworkers did not have a computer science (or similar) degree. Plus, at my first job out of college as a robotic process automation engineer, less than half of my entire department of engineers had a college degree. The point I am trying to make is: I have seen both sides and usually, honestly, unless you are going for a really fru-fru software engineering job somewhere in Corporate America, it doesn’t matter.

#career-change #coding #careers #technology #career-advice

Sasha  Lee

Sasha Lee

1624601340

From Science to Data Science

  1. Introduction and Hypothesis

I loved to work as a scientist. There is a deep feeling of completion and happiness when you manage to answer why. Finding out why such animal would go there, why would they do this at that time of the year, why is that place so diverse… This applies to any kind of field. This is the reason why I want to advocate that if you are a scientist, you might want to have a look at what is called Data Science in the technological field. Be aware, I will not dwell in the details of titles such as Data engineer, data analyst, data scientist, AI researcher. Here, when I refer to Data Science, I mean the science of finding insights from data collected about a subject.

So, back to our **_why. _**In science, in order to answer your why, you will introduce the whole context surrounding it and then formulate an hypothesis. “The timing of the diapause in copepods is regulated through their respiration, ammonia excretion and water column temperature”. Behaviour of subject is the result of internal and external processes.

In marketing, you would have to formulate similar hypothesis in order to start your investigation: “3-days old users un-suscribes due to the lack of direct path towards the check-out”. Behaviour of subject is the result of internal (frustration) and external (not optimized UE/UI) processes.

Although I would have wanted to put that part at the end, as for any scientific paper, it goes without saying that your introduction would present the current ideas, results, and hypotheses of your field of research. So, as a researcher, you need to accumulate knowledge about your subject, and you go looking for scientific articles. The same is true for techs as well. There are plenty of scientific and non-scientific resources out-there that will allow you to better understand, interpret and improve your product. Take this article, for instance, Medium is a wonderful base of knowledge on so many topics! But you could also find passionating articles on PloS One on Users Experience or Marketing Design and etc.

2. Material and Methods

As a Marine biologist and later an Oceanographer, I took great pleasure to go at the field and collect data (platyhelminths, fish counts, zooplankton , etc…). Then we needed to translate the living “data” into numeric data. In the technological industry, it is the same idea. Instead of nets, quadrats, and terrain coverage, you will setup tracking event, collect postbacks from your partners and pull third-parties data. The idea is the same, “how do I get the information that will help me answer my why”. So a field sampling mission and a data collection planning have a lot in common.

#ai #data-science #science #tech #data science #from science

Luna  Mosciski

Luna Mosciski

1598414580

Find Your Path in Computer Science

I vividly remember the nights I’ve fallen asleep in my college dorm questioning whether I chose the right major. In high school, I often responded to the questions about my career aspirations explaining that I wanted to be in technology, but not a “coder.” In reality, I had no idea what “coder” even meant; all I thought was that it wouldn’t sound cool or exciting for a girl like me. I thought that once I’d conformed to the stereotypical geek lifestyle in college, I’d no longer be able to nurture my own personal interests and explore what makes me happy.

While I still wonder what career would be the best fit for me, I’ve learned that a computer science education opens up endless opportunities to find yourself and explore new things. I asked my mentors in the industry how they found their place as a girl in the world of technology, and here’s what I learned.


Conquering Road Bumps

The fear of failure and the stigma of being a woman in CS are some of the biggest obstacles girls face in the pursuit of computer science. Made Lapuerta, a Harvard graduate with a CS degree, recalls that her first exposure to coding was from a video game design class in middle school, and she recoiled, thinking, “This is nerdy…. This is what my brother does.” As a byproduct of CS being such a primarily male-dominated field, many girls have the misconception that they aren’t fit to succeed in it, especially after an unsuccessful first attempt. Made later reflected, “Something I thought was so clearly for younger boys was something girls could excel at too.”

Once we realize anyone can code and we find our confidence, success becomes even more reachable. Stereotypes may remain, but learning to disregard them is a step to success. Lauren Smith, a recent graduate of the University of Washington, mentioned that despite the traditional developer stereotypes — being a recluse, staying up all night, sleeping in —, “I’m just going to keep doing it because I enjoy doing it.”


Choosing a Career

Like many, my initial image of a computer scientist was of a Steve Jobs-like software engineer hunched in front of huge monitors, spitting out code all day with no social interaction. Software engineering at a big tech company seemed like the ultimate goal during my freshman year, but I worried about what I would do if it wasn’t for me. However, after many discussions with my friends and mentors in computer science, I realize that a CS degree is an open door to any destination.

Made reflects on her realizations over the past few years of internships, career fairs, and college classes: “There are so many paths you can take with your coding skills and so many industries that need you — health care, fashion. Any company that needs a website needs engineers.” A computer science education presents you with valuable industry knowledge that employers can’t find elsewhere.

#women-in-tech #careers-in-tech #computer-science #data science