Brooke  Giles

Brooke Giles

1614830220

Spring @EntityScan vs. @ComponentScan

Learn about the usage of @EntityScan and @ComponentScan annotations and their differences.

When writing our Spring application we might need to specify a certain list of packages that contain our entity classes. Similarly, at some point, we would need only a specific list of our Spring beans to be initialized. This is where we can make use of @EntityScan or @ComponentScan annotations.

To clarify the terms we use here, components are classes with @Controller, @Service, @Repository, @Component, @Bean, etc. annotations. Entities are classes marked with @Entity annotation.

In this short tutorial, we’ll discuss the usage of @EntityScan and @ComponentScan in Spring, explain what are they used for, and then point out their differences.

#spring #java

What is GEEK

Buddha Community

Spring @EntityScan vs. @ComponentScan
Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1620720872

Spring vs Spring BooDifference Between Spring and Spring Boot

As an extension of the Spring Framework, Spring Boot is widely used to make development on Spring faster, more efficient and convenient. In this article, we will look at some of the parameters were using Spring Boot can drastically reduce the time and effort required in application development.

What is Spring?

Spring Boot

Difference between Spring and Spring Boot

Advantages of Spring Boot over Spring

Conclusion

#full stack development #spring #spring and spring boot #spring boot

Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1623559620

Spring Native turns Spring apps into native executables

Spring Native beta release leverages GraalVM to compile Spring Java and Kotlin applications to native images, reducing startup time and memory overhead compared to the JVM.

Spring Native, for compiling Spring Java applications to standalone executables called native images, is now available as a beta release. Native images promise faster startup times and lower runtime memory overhead compared to the JVM.

Launched March 11 and available on start.spring.io, the Spring Native beta compiles Spring applications to native images using the GraalVM multi-language runtime. These standalone executables offer benefits including nearly instant startup (typically fewer than 100ms), instant peak performance, and lower memory consumption, at the cost of longer build times and fewer runtime optimizations than the JVM.

#spring native turns spring apps into native executables #spring native #spring #native executables #spring apps

Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1623424020

Spring Framework Tutorial

What is the spring framework in Java?

The spring framework is one of the most versatile frameworks in java which is used to bring down the complexity of the development of enterprise-grade applications. The first production release of the spring framework was in March 2004 and since then, this robust and open-source framework has gained tremendous popularity, so much so that it is often referred to by developers all around the world as the “framework of frameworks”. Spring is a loosely coupled, open-source application framework of java. It is lightweight and the inversion of the control container for the Java platform. A large number of Java applications use the core features of the spring framework. In addition to that, extensions have also been developed to allow developers to develop Web Applications on top of the Java Enterprise Edition platform.

#spring #spring-framework #java #spring framework tutorial #why should one learn about the spring framework? #what is the spring framework in java?

Autumn  Blick

Autumn Blick

1598839687

How native is React Native? | React Native vs Native App Development

If you are undertaking a mobile app development for your start-up or enterprise, you are likely wondering whether to use React Native. As a popular development framework, React Native helps you to develop near-native mobile apps. However, you are probably also wondering how close you can get to a native app by using React Native. How native is React Native?

In the article, we discuss the similarities between native mobile development and development using React Native. We also touch upon where they differ and how to bridge the gaps. Read on.

A brief introduction to React Native

Let’s briefly set the context first. We will briefly touch upon what React Native is and how it differs from earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is a popular JavaScript framework that Facebook has created. You can use this open-source framework to code natively rendering Android and iOS mobile apps. You can use it to develop web apps too.

Facebook has developed React Native based on React, its JavaScript library. The first release of React Native came in March 2015. At the time of writing this article, the latest stable release of React Native is 0.62.0, and it was released in March 2020.

Although relatively new, React Native has acquired a high degree of popularity. The “Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2019” report identifies it as the 8th most loved framework. Facebook, Walmart, and Bloomberg are some of the top companies that use React Native.

The popularity of React Native comes from its advantages. Some of its advantages are as follows:

  • Performance: It delivers optimal performance.
  • Cross-platform development: You can develop both Android and iOS apps with it. The reuse of code expedites development and reduces costs.
  • UI design: React Native enables you to design simple and responsive UI for your mobile app.
  • 3rd party plugins: This framework supports 3rd party plugins.
  • Developer community: A vibrant community of developers support React Native.

Why React Native is fundamentally different from earlier hybrid frameworks

Are you wondering whether React Native is just another of those hybrid frameworks like Ionic or Cordova? It’s not! React Native is fundamentally different from these earlier hybrid frameworks.

React Native is very close to native. Consider the following aspects as described on the React Native website:

  • Access to many native platforms features: The primitives of React Native render to native platform UI. This means that your React Native app will use many native platform APIs as native apps would do.
  • Near-native user experience: React Native provides several native components, and these are platform agnostic.
  • The ease of accessing native APIs: React Native uses a declarative UI paradigm. This enables React Native to interact easily with native platform APIs since React Native wraps existing native code.

Due to these factors, React Native offers many more advantages compared to those earlier hybrid frameworks. We now review them.

#android app #frontend #ios app #mobile app development #benefits of react native #is react native good for mobile app development #native vs #pros and cons of react native #react mobile development #react native development #react native experience #react native framework #react native ios vs android #react native pros and cons #react native vs android #react native vs native #react native vs native performance #react vs native #why react native #why use react native

Were  Joyce

Were Joyce

1620728340

Spring Framework: To Use Or Not To Use, That Is The Question

It’s impossible to write OOP code with Spring. From its core it promotes the use of singletons and anemic data structures a.k.a. data “objects” a.k.a. DTO. This fuels procedural programming and kills OOP.

In the next paragraphs I’ll highlight three **major **Spring components involved. I start from the core.

IoC Container

The core of Spring is the IoC container, represented by the

ApplicationContextinterface. Basically it defines a context through which we get beans. A bean is an object managed by the container and it has a name attached to it.

We can configure the context thanks to some annotations, called steorotype. These annotations were introduced in Spring 2.5 and enhanced in Spring 3.0. Previously we could only use an external XML. This was even worse…

So we annotate a class with a stereotype, the container reads it and it builds a bean. A bean is a singleton. For this reason it cannot represent anything specific. This means that to do something useful we should pass around data “objects” through them.

A bean is an object only from a technological point of view. But at the conceptual level it’s just a namespace for procedures. In other words it’s a bunch of procedure grouped by a name. Nothing more. Every bean, regardless the stereotype, is bad.

This is not OOP. But I’m not saying anything new. It’s known that singleton are bad. But this (anti)pattern is the Spring backbone.

At this point it should suffice to say that everything else in Spring is based on bean. This means that every Spring application is composed by bean that works on data structure. Definitely this is not OOP.

However I think that things gets worse with the next two components…

#spring #spring-boot #java #spring-mvc #spring-data #oop #procedural-programming #software-engineering